Institute of Allied Health Sciences Research areas of expertise

The institute covers a wide range of research, including lab-based, clinical, sociological aspects of health and educational.

We cover many health conditions, from cardiovascular and metabolic disease to sickle cell disease, obesity and hyperhidrosis. Our main areas of expertise fall within the themed areas below:

Biomedical and environmental health

This research involves the use of state-of-the-art techniques and processes to address global challenges related to improving the environment and human health.

Facilities include the Biomedical and Environmental Health Research Laboratory, which was officially opened in December 2017 by the Nobel Laureate Sir Paul Nurse FRS.

The main areas of focus are removing contaminants from water, reducing human exposure to harmful chemicals, identifying safe and nutritious foods as well as developing advanced biomedical approaches to tackle the global burden of disease and hunger.

The research is interdisciplinary, with expertise that includes the following areas: biomedical science, biotechnology, bioinformatics, genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, molecular biology, biophysics, microbiology, chemical biology, parasitology, physiology, reproductive biology, toxicology, biomedical spectroscopy, environmental science, water treatment technologies and public health.

Diverse techniques are used to investigate a range of health problems including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, asthma, hyperhidrosis, infectious diseases, skeletal muscle disorders, several types of cancers and neurodegenerative disease.

Primary contact

Professor Parvez Haris, Professor of Biomedical Science

De Montfort University
Hawthorn Building, 3.M2
The Gateway
Leicester
LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 250 6306
E: pharis@dmu.ac.uk

Health and Wellbeing

The Health and Wellbeing theme brings together researchers from diverse areas within the institute, to find applied solutions to contemporary health and wellbeing issues. Topics of interest are wide-ranging, and include: mental health, ageing, dementia, the military, healthcare organisation, amputation.

With particular expertise in qualitative methods, including ethnography and conversation analysis, members of the institute prioritise the experiences of those who may be marginalised within health and healthcare. There is also a growing focus on pedagogical research by our members, including widening participation and inclusivity in allied health and the value of global outreach for clinical education.

Examples of current projects:

  • Multisite ethnography into continence care for people living with dementia and cognitive impairment in acute hospitals;
  • Feasibility study into creating a personalise digitised memory box for older people  in the community.

Primary contact

Dr Esmée Hanna, VC2020 Lecturer

De Montfort University
Edith Murphy Building, 6.09
The Gateway
Leicester
LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 257 7119
E: esmee.hanna@dmu.ac.uk

Nutrition and metabolic health

The nutrition and metabolic health theme brings together researchers in many different aspects of basic, translational and public health research. Academics have a wide range of skills, including laboratory molecular techniques, survey and interview-based methods and clinical research.

Our research interests are wide and include weight management and promotion of healthy diet and lifestyles as well as molecular investigations into the mechanisms behind disease processes.

Current lab-based projects include the impact metabolic syndrome has on human physiology, including vascular dynamics, gut biome imbalance and immunological markers.

Other ongoing studies include the effect of diet on hyperhidrosis and identifying barriers to certain ethnic groups accessing weight management services.

Primary contact

Dr Harprit Singh, VC2020 Senior Lecturer

De Montfort University
Edith Murphy Building, 0.24
The Gateway
Leicester
LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 257 7779
E: harprit.singh@dmu.ac.uk

Sickle cell and thalassaemia

Academics from the social study of sickle cell and thalassemia research unit work with experts from across the country to carry out pioneering sociological research into issues facing people with the conditions.

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a collective name for a number of inherited blood conditions that mainly affect people of African, Caribbean, Middle Eastern, South Asian and Mediterranean descent and can include episodes of chronic and acute pain as well as strokes.

Prior to the establishment of this research collaboration, little was known about the social impact of SCD.

We have studied issues connected to experiences of young people with SCD at school; problems of targeting sickle cell/thalassaemia screening by ethnicity; the politics of sickle cell and unexpected deaths in custody; sickle cell and employment, and applying the social model of disability to sickle cell.

Primary contact

Professor Simon Dyson, Professor of Applied Sociology

De Montfort University
Hawthorn Building, 1.27
The Gateway
Leicester
LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 257 7751
E: sdyson@dmu.ac.uk

 
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