Professor Kay de Vries

Job: Professor of Older People's Health

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: School of Nursing and Midwifery

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 207 8148

E: kay.devries@dmu.ac.uk

W:

 

Personal profile

Kay de Vries is Professor of Older People’s Health at De Montfort University, UK. Kay has a nursing background with a career ranging from Public Health Nursing in a remote part of New Zealand to specialising in palliative and old age care in the UK. She has a strong interest in virtue ethics, specifically humility and generosity.

Kay has held a number of research grants both on the UK and in New Zealand and her research expertise is predominantly in end of life, old age and dementia care; in acute, community and care home environments. Examples of recent research projects include; experiences of caregivers of people with dementia on acute hospital admissions and providing end of life care; assessing for risk of abuse, neglect and loss of dignity for people with dementia in care homes; she has been involved in the development of a number of training resources for healthcare providers of dementia care.

Kay is predominantly a qualitative researcher and has expertise in all qualitative research methodologies but is also experienced in using mixed methods approaches. She has developed and led a number of postgraduate research programmes and supervised a large number of MSc and PhD research students. She holds three research affiliate positions in the UK, USA and New Zealand.

Research group affiliations

  • Alzheimer’s Research UK (ARUK) Midlands Network
  • East Midlands Research into Ageing Network (EMRAN)
  • CLAHRC East Midlands
  • Member British Society of Gerontology BSG, UK
  • Reviewer for research grants: Alzheimer’s Society Research Grants, UK; BUPA Foundation Grants, UK; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), UK
  • Member of the National Dementia Care Cooperative, New Zealand

Publications and outputs 

  • Dignity in long-term care: An application of Nordenfelt’s work
    Dignity in long-term care: An application of Nordenfelt’s work de Vries, Kay; Kane, J. The concept of dignity is recognised as a fundamental right in many countries. It is embedded into law, human rights legislation and is often visible in organisations’ philosophy of care, particularly in aged care. Yet, many authors describe difficulties in defining dignity and how it can be preserved for people living in long- term care. In this article, Nordenfelt’s ‘four notions of dignity’ are considered, drawing on the different perspectives of those who receive, observe or deliver care in the context of the long-term care environment. On examination of the literature we suggest that two of Nordenfelt’s notions, ‘dignity of identity’ and ‘dignity of Menschenwurde’, are a common thread for residents, family members and staff when conceptualising dignity within long-term care environments. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Ethical dilemmas faced by hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation to patients with terminal cancer.
    Ethical dilemmas faced by hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation to patients with terminal cancer. de Vries, Kay; Plaskota, Marek Objective: Palliative sedation is a method of symptom management frequently used in hospices to treat uncontrolled symptoms at the end of life. There is a substantial body of literature on this subject; however, there has been little research into the experiences of hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation in an attempt to manage the terminal restlessness experienced by cancer patients. Method: Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of seven hospice nurses who had cared for at least one patient who had undergone palliative sedation within the past year in a hospice in the south of England in the United Kingdom. A phenomenological approach and Colaizzi’s stages of analysis were employed to develop themes from the data. Results: Facilitating a “peaceful death” was the primary goal of the nurses, where through the administration of palliative sedation they sought to enable and support patients to be “comfortable,” “relaxed,” and “calm” at the terminal stage of their illness. Ethical dilemmas related to decision making were a factor in achieving this. These were: medication decisions, “juggling the drugs,” “causing the death,” sedating young people, the family “requesting” sedation, and believing that hospice is a place where death is hastened. Significance of results: Hospice nurses in the U.K. frequently encounter ethical and emotional dilemmaswhen administering palliative sedation. Making such decisions about using palliative sedation causes general discomfort for them. Undertaking this aspect of care requires confidence and competence on the part of nurses, and working within a supportive hospice team is of fundamental importance in supporting this practice.
  • Just another day”: The lived experience of being a hundred years old for ten New Zealanders.
    Just another day”: The lived experience of being a hundred years old for ten New Zealanders. Ratan, Ashwina; de Vries, Kay The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the experiences of extended longevity as perceived by centenarians. Centenarians (people over 100 years of age) are the fastest growing group of the ageing population in developed countries. Ten centenarians aged between 100 and 106 years, living in the Lower North Island of New Zealand, participated in the study. The biographical narrative interpretive method of inquiry guided data collection through face-to-face interviews, and thematic analysis was subsequently undertaken. Four themes were identified: (a) ‘becoming a centenarian: ‘Just another day’; (b) ‘growing up in a privileged environment’ that revealed four sub-themes: ‘having freedom and choice’, ‘being loved and nurtured’, ‘living healthy lifestyles’ and having ‘good education prospects’; (c) ‘unique opportunities in adult life’; and (d) ‘positive ageing and celebration of longevity’. The centenarians spoke nonchalantly about their experience of turning 100 and positive personalities were prominent features of the participants, who all expressed a sense of acceptance and satisfaction with life and contentment with living in the present, a feature throughout their lives that was ongoing and at an intergenerational level. This study has provided further insights into the existing literature on longevity and through the narratives of the centenarians has demonstrated the value of Erikson’s psycho-social stages of development and Tornstam’s theory of gerotranscendence when considering positive ageing. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Morbidly obese patients’ experiences of mobility during hospitalisation and rehabilitation: A qualitative descriptive study.
    Morbidly obese patients’ experiences of mobility during hospitalisation and rehabilitation: A qualitative descriptive study. Hales, Caz; Curran, Nikki; de Vries, Kay Morbid obesity is strongly linked to declining mobility and is a main risk factor for mobility disability. Little is known about morbidly obese patients’ experience of mobility during hospital admission and the specific rehabilitation needs of this patient population. The aim of the study was to explore the mobility experiences and needs of morbidly obese patients before and during hospital admission. A qualitative descriptive methodology was used where semi-structured interviews with morbidly obese patients were undertaken and content analysis conducted. Seven people who were morbidly obese and admitted to one tertiary level hospital in New Zealand for various medical and surgical reasons in the previous six months participated in the study. Key findings revealed that pre-existing mobility had a significant impact on the experiences and needs of morbidly obese patients during hospitalisation. The physical environment of the hospital compounded and intensified mobilisation difficulties. Two categories were identified, these were: ‘compromised pre-existing mobility’, with a subcategory of ‘accessing services prior to admission’; and ‘mobilisation difficulties.
  • Advance care planning for people with dementia: Ordinary everyday conversations
    Advance care planning for people with dementia: Ordinary everyday conversations de Vries, Kay; Drury-Ruddlesden, Jenny Advance care planning for people with dementia has become a focus of dementia care policies in developed countries. In New Zealand, the framework for dementia care relies on the person with dementia having a level of competence to enable them to participate in the planning process. For people with dementia, it may be too late to initiate these discussions in terms of decision making capacity. Consequently, decisions about end-of-life care for people with dementia are typically made by a family member who acts as a surrogate decision maker on behalf of the person with dementia. An exploratory qualitative study of 23 people who had been carers or provided support for a family member with dementia who had died within five years of the interview was undertaken. The overarching theme, ‘ordinary everyday conversations’, describes how informal conversations and discussions within the family relating to preferences at the end of life had been embedded in interactions within the families over years. Sub-themes revealed three important components enabling adherence to the prior wishes of the person with dementia through these conversations: knowing the person and belief in ‘doing the right thing’; the importance of Wills and Enduring Power of Attorney; and negotiating unexpected encounters. There is potential for families to be well prepared for the time when they may need to make decisions for the person with dementia based on ordinary everyday conversation that take place within families and throughout life. This study also suggests that more innovative approaches to making a Will may provide an important vehicle for expressing advanced care wishes.
  • Administering questionnaires to older people: Rigid adherence to protocol may deny and disacknowledge emotional expression
    Administering questionnaires to older people: Rigid adherence to protocol may deny and disacknowledge emotional expression de Vries, Kay; Leppa, C.; Sandford, R.; Vydelingum, V. This paper draws on data from a larger study conducted in care home facilities in: Seattle, USA; West Sussex and Surrey in the UK; and in the lower North Island in New Zealand. Two extracts from interactions between the researchers and an older person during the administration of The Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale in a care home facility in New Zealand were analysed following Houtkoop-Steenstra and using a Conversation Analysis (CA) approach. In the first extract the audio-recorded transcript was examined for events of institutional talk and rephrasing of questionnaire questions. We also examined the transcript for missed cues and the impact of closed questions when administrating questionnaires to older people living in care home facilities. We then present an extract where the researcher uses a conversational approach during the administration of the same questionnaire. We conclude that rigid adherence to interview protocols when administering questionnaires to older people who cannot complete these themselves disables the interviewer from interacting and engaging in a meaningful conversation or responding to cues that indicate distress or expressions of grief. The effect of this approach may deny and disacknowledge older persons' emotional experiences and for the older person the interview may not be a therapeutic encounter. Based on our analysis and experiences of conducting this research we support recommendations that a collaborative approach, allowing an interactional exchange between interviewer and respondent, be used when administering questionnaires to older people in care home facilities. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link
  • Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: a focused ethnography
    Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: a focused ethnography Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen A. Background:Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. Aim: To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. Design and methods: A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the ‘situated’ experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. Setting: An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Participants: Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index 40 kg/m2. Findings: Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. Conclusions: This study has brought new understandings about intensive care situations where social awkwardness occurs in the context of obesity and care practices, and of the performances and behaviours The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Open access article
  • Managing risk during care transitions when approaching end of life: A qualitative study of patients’ and health care professionals’ decision making
    Managing risk during care transitions when approaching end of life: A qualitative study of patients’ and health care professionals’ decision making Coombs, Maureen A.; Parker, Roses; de Vries, Kay Background: Increasing importance is being placed on the coordination of services at the end of life. Aim: To describe decision-making processes that influence transitions in care when approaching the end of life. Design: Qualitative study using field observations and longitudinal semi-structured interviews. Setting/participants: Field observations were undertaken in three sites: a residential care home, a medical assessment unit and a general medical unit in New Zealand. The Supportive and Palliative Care Indicators Tool was used to identify participants with advanced and progressive illness. Patients and family members were interviewed on recruitment and 3–4 months later. Four weeks of fieldwork were conducted in each site. A total of 40 interviews were conducted: 29 initial interviews and 11 follow-up interviews. Thematic analysis was undertaken. Findings: Managing risk was an important factor that influenced transitions in care. Patients and health care staff held different perspectives on how such risks were managed. At home, patients tolerated increasing risk and used specific support measures to manage often escalating health and social problems. In contrast, decisions about discharge in hospital were driven by hospital staff who were risk-adverse. Availability of community and carer services supported risk management while a perceived need for early discharge decision making in hospital and making ‘safe’ discharge options informed hospital discharge decisions. Conclusion: While managing risk is an important factor during care transitions, patients should be able to make choices on how to live with risk at the end of life. This requires reconsideration of transitional care and current discharge planning processes at the end of life. open access article
  • ‘And so I took up residence’:The experiences of family members of people with dementia during admissionto an acute hospital unit
    ‘And so I took up residence’:The experiences of family members of people with dementia during admissionto an acute hospital unit de Vries, Kay; Drury-Ruddlesden, Jenny; Gaul, Chris It is estimated that a quarter of acute hospital beds are in use by older people with dementia at any one time. Little empirical research has been carried out that has specifically examined the day-to-day input of family members into the care of people with dementia during an acute hospital admission. In this article, we present the results of analysis of interviews with 26 family members of people with dementia about their experiences of supporting an admission of a person with dementia to an acute hospital unit in New Zealand. For all family members, the desire to support the person with dementia during their admission was at the forefront and was their primary focus. The theme, ‘And so I took up residence’, exemplifies fully the experiences of all of the family member participants. This study provides evidence that family members are a resource that may be unrecognised, untapped and unsupported in the event of hospitalisation of people with dementia.
  • Redefining the patient-carer model at end of life
    Redefining the patient-carer model at end of life de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen A.; Parker, R. Context: While the patient-carer dyad has been broadly described, there is little exploration about carer-patient models in use. Aim: To explore types of carer-patient models in use for those with advanced and progressive disease. Methods: Qualitative interviews were undertaken with patients at risk of dying in the next year and their carers across three sites (residential care home, medical assessment unit, general medical unit). Thematic analysis was undertaken. Results: Four patient-carer models were identified. In these, the provision of care and of coordination of care services were important areas and organised differently across the patient, the carer, and alternative sources of support. Conclusion: A ‘one size fits all’ carer-patient model is outdated and a new understanding of different types of carer-patient models are required to fully inform care delivered at end of life. Key words: End of life l The author's final peer reviewed version can be found by following the URI link. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Research interests/expertise

  • Old age
  • Dementia
  • Family caregivers of older people and people with dementia
  • Acute, community and care home environments
  • End of life/palliative care
  • Humility

Qualifications

  • 2006: PhD, (Health & Medical Sciences) University of Surrey, UK
  • Thesis Title: Caring for the person with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease within the hospice service.
  • 2000: MSc (Education) University of Surrey, UK
  • 1997: Postgraduate Certificate in Education of Adults (PGCEA), University of Surrey, UK
  • 1997: BSc (Hons) Nursing, Middlesex University, London, UK
  • 1991: Registered Nurse, NMC, UK: NMC Reg. No: 90L0020O 

Conference attendance

  • Drury-Ruddlesden, J., de Vries, K. (2016). Computer gaming therapy. Alzheimers NZ Biennial Conference, Wellington, NZ, Nov (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Drury-Ruddlesden, J., Gaul, C. (2016). “And so I took up residence”: The experiences of family members of people with dementia during admission to an acute hospital unit. 45th Annual BSG Conference, Stirling, July (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Drury-Ruddlesden, J. (2014). Recognising, screening and diagnosis for dementia in acute hospital units: Challenges and pitfalls. Alzheimers NZ Biennial Conference, Rotorua, NZ, Nov (paper)
  • Drury-Ruddlesden, J., de Vries, K. (2014). Does computer gaming therapy contribute to improved quality of life and cognitive functioning for people with mild to moderate dementia? Results of a pilot study. Alzheimers NZ Biennial Conference, Rotorua, NZ. Nov (paper)
  • Coombs MA, de Vries K, Tester R, Donovan S, Fullbrook P. (2014). Areas of uncertainty and difference in attitudes about end of life nursing care practices: an international comparison. ESICM LIVES 2014, 27th Annual Congress, Barcelona, Spain, Sept (Poster)
  • de Vries, K., Nelson, K., Tait, P., Broadbent, H., Coombs, M., Naylor, W. (2014). How do nurses contribute to palliative care prescribing practices in the community? Palliative Care Nurses Australia (PCNA) Conference, Sydney, April (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2013). Nurses singing while they work with people with dementia. Linking Cultures: NZSM Music Therapy Conference 2013, New Zealand School of Music, Wellington, NZ. Nov (Invited speaker)
  • de Vries, K., (2012). ‘Stranger’ in the environment: observing people with advanced dementia. Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines, University of Waikato, NZ, Nov (paper)
  • Lally, E., Nelson, K., de Vries, K. (2012). A study of patient and practice nurse engagements. New Zealand Nurses Organisation Research Conference, Nelson, Nov (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Brooker, D., La Fontaine, J., Porter, T.(2012). Emotional responses to observation research in the field of dementia care: ethical and moral considerations. British Society of Gerontology (BSG) Conference 2012, Keele University, UK, July (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Vydelingum, V., Leppa, C., Sandford, R.(2012). Morale and Spirituality in care homes in the UK and NZ: Analysis of interviews collected using questionnaires. British Society of Gerontology (BSG) Conference 2012, Keele University, UK, July (paper)
  • Knox, R., de Vries, K. (2012). What research do we need? One robust and collaborative way to answer the question. 20th Hospice New Zealand Palliative Care Conference. Auckland, NZ, Nov (paper)
  • Bowden-Tucker, J., de Vries, K. (2012) End of life in the home: Supporting and sustaining family. 20th Hospice New Zealand Palliative Care Conference. Auckland, NZ, Nov (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Brooker, D., La Fontaine, J., Porter, T.(2012). Emotional responses to observation research in the field of dementia care: ethical and moral considerations. Alzheimers New Zealand Conference 2012, Future Faces of Dementia, Wellington, NZ, May (paper)
  • Ridley S., de Vries K. (2012). ‘Sidelined: the experience of family carers of people with dementia] in the Emergency Department’. Alzheimers New Zealand Conference, Future Faces of Dementia, Wellington, NZ, May (paper)
  • Lally, E., Nelson, K., de Vries, K. (2011). Patient and practice nurse engagements. Consumers Reforming Health Conference, Melbourne, July (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2011). Advance Care Planning, UK perspective. Palliative Care Network Forum, Palmerston North, NZ. July. Invited Speaker
  • de Vries, K. (2011). Ethics at the end of life – ‘Starting the conversation’. Changing Minds 2011. Te Omanga Hospice, Lower Hutt, Wellington, NZ. July. Invited Speaker.
  • de Vries, K. (2011). Ethical Issues in Managing Care of People with Dementia within a Hospice Environment. Third Biennial Palliative Care Nurses New Zealand (PCNNZ) conference, “Building Capacity and Capability in Palliative Care Nursing in New Zealand”, Wellington, Nov (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Vydelingum, V., Leppa, C. (2010). An approach to data collection: combining questionnaire data collection with interview data collection. British Society of Gerontology (BSG) Conference, Brunel University, London, UK. July (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2010). Master Class Working in partnership with academia to improve care. Achieving a good death: Best practice and innovations in the current climate. Dementia UK, & National Council for Palliative Care (NCPC), London. December. Invited Speaker
  • de Vries, K. (2010) Dementia as a terminal illness: challenges and dilemmas. Rhetoric or Reality? The challenges in responding to diversity and differences when delivering EOL care, 10th Annual Worcestershire Palliative Care Conference, Worcester. April. Invited Speaker
  • de Vries, K, Reith, M. (2009). ‘End-of-life care: developing practice in caring for the whole family unit’, Two day workshop. Annual Hospice Palliative Care International Workshop, Peace House Hospice, Tokyo, Japan. February. (Invited Speaker)
  • de Vries, K., (2009). Healing, caring and silence. 10th Anniversary International Conference Nursing Ethics (NCNE) Conference, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK. Sept (paper)
  • de Vries, K., Nowell, A. (2009). Development of a hospice based education programme for health care professionals focusing on end-of-life care for people with dementia. 19th Alzheimer Europe Conference, Brussels, Belgium. May (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2009). Emergent fit, open systems theory and grounded theory in constructing substantive or formal theory. Symbolic Interaction and Ethnographic Research: 26th Annual Qualitative Analysis Conference, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. April (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2009). Dealing with the unknown’: an explanatory theory of managing the care of the person with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by the hospice service. Symbolic Interaction and Ethnographic Research: 26th Annual Qualitative Analysis Conference, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. April (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2008). Emergent fit and grounded theory. 7th Qualitative Research Conference, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, UK. Sept (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2008). Humility and helplessness in the realisation of limitations within hospice. Nursing Ethics and Health Care Policy – Bridging Local, National and International Perspectives: International Centre for Nursing Ethics Conference, Yale University School of Nursing, USA. July (paper)
  • de Vries, K., McChrystal, J. (2008). Applying attachment theory and research to care of people with dementia. International Emotions Conference, University of Surrey, June (paper)
  • de Vries, K. (2008). Ethical issues in managing end-stage dementia within a hospice environment. 18th Alzheimer Europe Conference, Oslo, Norway. May (paper)

Current research students

  • 2012 submitting Dec 2017, Aria Graham, PhD, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ, Tika tonu: Young Māori Mothers’ experiences of wellbeing in the 12 months following the birth of their first tamaiti (infant). Narrative biography. Principal Supervisor.
  • 2011 submitting Dec 2017, Delia Baskerville, PhD, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Educational Psychology & Pedagogy, Underneath the skin of truancy in schools. Grounded Theory. Co-supervisor.
  • 2012 – 2018, Isabelle Latham, PhD, Association for Dementia Studies, University of Worcester, UK, Learning to care: An ethnographic study of how care workers in care homes learn to care for people living with dementia. Ethnography. Second Supervisor.
  • 2015 – 2018, Laura Gilbert, PhD, School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton. A study to explore the experiences of young people aged 16-21 years with Neuromuscular disorders of their experiences of transition from children's to adult services. Case Study. Second Supervisor.
  • 2015 – 2018, Rachel Heathershaw, PhD, School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton. A critical exploration of role modelling as a leadership behaviour in nursing practice. Case Study. Second Supervisor.
  • 2016 – 2020, Donna Goddard, PhD, School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Examination of prison nursing. Narrative historical. Principle Supervisor.

Externally funded research grants information

  • Research title: An investigation of use of simulated training to enhance clinical leadership skills within the residential care sector. The project offer a transferable approach to strengthen clinical leadership to ensure nurses and care assistants are able to lead care.
    Team: Prof Kate Galvin (PI) University of Brighton, Prof Kay de Vries De Montfort University, Dr Iain Wilkinson (Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer – BSMS, Consultant Orthogeriatrician) Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust
    Dates: Oct 2018 - 2020
    Funding: £49,431 Burdette Trust

  • Research title: Review of the New Zealand literature on dementias and related conditions. Aim to review the existing bio-psychosocial literature on dementias and related conditions in New Zealand.
    Team: Dr Podugu Prasadarao (PI) Waikato; Dr Kay de Vries; Dr Gary Cheung Auckland
    Dates: Oct 2014 - 2015
    Funding: $5,000 Alzheimers NZ Charitable Trust
     
  • Research title: Cognitive Stimulation using computer technology for people with mild to moderate dementia (3 years PhD Scholarship).
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Jenny Drury-Ruddlesden (PhD Student); Dr Kathy Nelson
    Dates: August 2013 - Jan 2017
    Funding: $100,000 Callaghan Innovation/Im-Able Limited (PhD Fellowship)

  • Research title: Delphi Study: Research priorities for Te Omanga Hospice.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Prof Jo Walton; Rhondda Knox; Dr Kathy Nelson
    Dates: April 2013 (6 months)
    Funding: $2,000, Te Omanga Hospice, Lower Hutt, NZ
     
  • Research title: Exploration of family/whānau/caregivers of people with dementia about their experiences of end of life care.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Jenny Drury-Ruddlesden
    Dates: June 2012 – June 2014
    Funding: $8,300 Alzheimers NZ Charitable Trust

  • Research title: Evaluation of the end of life care experiences of people with dementia and their caregivers.
    Team: Dr Kate Read (PI); Dr Kay de Vries; Karen Harrison-Dening; Jennifer Bray
    Dates: March 2011-2013
    Funding: £34,000 (£24,000 – Dementia UK, £10,000 – West Midlands Strategic Health Authority (WMSHA), UK)

  • Research title: Scoping of education for end of life care and dementia.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Jennifer Bray
    Dates: July 2010 – April 2011 (9 months)
    Funding: £20,000 West Midlands Strategic Health Authority, UK

  • Research title: Training and development resource (DVD) for healthcare staff working with people with dementia.
    Team: Prof Dawn Brooker, Dr Kay de Vries and Association for Dementia Studies Team
    Dates: Jan 2010 – June 2011 (18 months),
    Funding: £100,000, Workforce Deanery Herefordshire and Worcestershire, UK
     
  • Research title: Explore the support and education needs of people with dementia and carers within the Coventry and Warwickshire area in collaboration with Coventry University
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Jenny La Fontaine; Prof Dawn Brooker
    Dates: Feb-May 2010 (4 months)
    Funding: £59,719 NHS Coventry, UK
     
  • Research title: Developing a tool for assessing for risk of abuse, neglect and loss of dignity for people with dementia in care homes.
    Team: Prof Dawn Brooker (PI); Jenny La Fontaine; Dr Kay de Vries; Tom Porter; Dr Claire Surr
    Dates: Jan 2010-April 2011 (16 months)
    Funding: £65,000 Department of Health (Comic Relief) PANICOA UK

  • Research title: Development of role, competences and proposed training for; “Primary Care Liaison Worker” to support pathway to diagnosis of dementia.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Prof Dawn Brooker; Tom Porter
    Dates: Sept 2009 – March 2010 (6 months)
    Funding: £10,800, Workforce Development for Dementia, Strategic Health Authority, West Midlands, UK

  • Research title: Study of carers of patients with a malignant brain tumour.
    Team: Dr Anne Arber (PI); Prof Sara Faithfull; Dr Caroline Lucas; Dr Kay de Vries; Marek Plaskota
    Dates: 2007-2009 (24 months)
    Funding: £28,000, Surrey, Sussex Palliative Care Network, UK
     
  • Research title: Development and evaluation of ‘best practice guide’/’pathway’ and education programme for caring for people with dementia at the end of life within the hospice.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Allyson Nowell
    Dates: 2008-2009 (18 months)
    Funding: £50,000, Barclay Capital Fund UK

Internally funded research project information

  • Research title: Transition across services for older people.
    Team: Prof Maureen Coombs (PI) Victoria University of Wellington; Dr Kay de Vries, University of Brighton, UK; Roslyn Parker (RA) Victoria University of Wellington
    Dates: Feb 2015 – Nov 2015 
    Funding: $33,000, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ

  • Research title: The Emergency Department clinicians' perspectives of managing people with chronic pain.
    Team: Dr Kathy Nelson (PI); Dr Kay de Vries; Dr Paul Hardy (Pain Physician Consultant); Dagmar Hempel; Aseni Ratnayake (nurses)
    Dates: Dec 2012 - Dec 2014
    Funding: $ 4,997 Victoria University of Wellington, NZ
     
  • Research title: Intensive care nurses experiences of, and attitudes towards, end of life care: a New Zealand perspective.
    Team: Prof Maureen Coombs (PI); Dr Kay de Vries; Prof Paul Fulbrook
    Dates: June 2013 - June 2014
    Funding: $4,996, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ

  • Research title: Quality of life study of residents in nursing homes.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Rosemarie Sandford (Masters student)
    Dates: Jan 2013 - 2014 (extended from UK & US studies)
    Funding: $3,880 Victoria University of Wellington, NZ

  • Research title: Examination of the experiences of older people with dementia and their professional and family caregivers during admission to an acute hospital unit.
    Team: Dr Kay de Vries (PI); Jenny Drury-Ruddlesden
    Dates: March 2012 – Jan 2015
    Funding: $39,714 Victoria University of Wellington, NZ.

Professional esteem indicators

Journal reviewer for: Nursing Ethics; Ageing & Society; Qualitative Health Research; International Journal of Nursing Studies; Palliative Medicine; Journal of Palliative Medicine; Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care; International Journal of Palliative Nursing; Nursing Older People; BMJ; Quality of Life Research; Age & Ageing; BMC Health Services Research; Nursing Inquiry; Journal of Advanced Nursing; Dementia

Teaching resource, DVD and associated workbook nominated for National Award http://www.worcester.ac.uk/discover/9981.html 

PIECE-dem tool that being used both nationally and internationally for assessment of practice and in research in care environments for people with dementia.

 http://www.panicoa.org.uk/panicoa-studies/how-can-i-tell-you-whats-going-on-here  

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