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Professor Martin Grootveld

Job: Professor of Bioanalytical Chemistry and Chemical Pathology

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: Leicester School of Pharmacy

Research group(s): Biomedical & Environmental Health

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 250 6443

E: mgrootveld@dmu.ac.uk

W: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/pharmacy

 

Personal profile

After first graduating in Chemistry/Statistical Analysis at Birkbeck College, University of London in 1981 (achieved part-time whilst employed as a scientific officer at Guy’s Hospital Poisons Unit), Prof. Grootveld completed his PhD degree research programme on bioanalytical chemistry and metallodrugs in 1985 at the same institution and then conducted post-doctoral work on the analysis of ‘markers’ of free radical activity in biofluids at King’s College, University of London for 2 years. He then spent 2.5 years lecturing and conducting research work at the Polytechnic of North London prior to taking up a Lectureship in Clinical Chemistry at St. Bartholomew’s and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1989, where he subsequently became Senior Lecturer and then Reader in Chemical Pathology. Later, he transferred to London South Bank University where he was also Reader in Chemical Pathology, and Director of their MSc Forensic Science course. He was then appointed Professor of Chemical Pathology and Biomedical Materials at the Institute for Materials Research and Innovation (IMRI), University of Bolton where he established and directed a Master’s course in Medical and Healthcare Devices which was the first of its kind available in the UK. Recently, he took up the position of Professor of Bioanalytical Chemistry at Leicester School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, where he is also Head of the Chemistry for Health/Bioanalytical Sciences Research Group. He was Visiting Professor of Clinical Chemistry at Queen’s University Belfast from 2001-2005. Prof. Grootveld is the author of more than 160 full, peer-reviewed research publications in reputable international scientific and/or clinical journals, 25 reviews/book chapters, and more than 250 refereed conference contributions. He is also the Editor and author of 4 books. Since 1987, he has attracted more than £8,000,000 of external research funding. In 2020 alone, Prof. Grootveld achieved 20 full-length research publications in reputable scientific or clinical journals, along with 4 reviews and 1 edited/authored book. Prof. Grootveld was the very first researcher to apply non-stationary, low-field benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) facilities to the multicomponent analysis of biological fluids such as human urine as early as 2014, which was long before anyone else had attempted to claim or exploit this development.  

Prof. Grootveld is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Institute of Biomedical Sciences. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society. His is also a member of the Editorial Board of the highly-prestigious MDPI journal Metabolites, and is currently serving as a lead guest Editor for Frontiers in Nutrition. He organised and the very first international symposium regarding the applications of high-resolution NMR techniques to the oral science area (IADR conference, New Orleans, USA, March 2007). His administrative duties have included student recruitment, budget and policy issues, together with successful programme development. Previously, he also held the position of Honorary Associate Clinical Professor at Warwick Medical and Dental School, University of Warwick for a 3-year period. Prof. Grootveld was also shortlisted as one of the top 5 PhD supervisors in the whole of the UK by FindAUniversity Ltd. in 2020.

Research activities: Attraction of research funding from research councils, EU, medical charities, industrial sources, etc.; operation and management of such externally-funded research programmes; publication of research data in reputable scientific/clinical journals; supervision of post-doctoral and postgraduate staff; generation and management of research grant research outputs.

Research group affiliations

Biomedical & Environmental Health

Medicinal Chemistry

Bioanalytical Chemistry

Pharmacology

Publications and outputs 

  • Title: Dental anxiety in first- and final-year Indian dental students
    Title: Dental anxiety in first- and final-year Indian dental students Grootveld, M.; Chowdhury, Chitta Ranjan; Khijmatgar, Shahnawaz; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Harding, Stewart; Lynch, Edward Abstract Objectives: The study aims to investigate dental anxiety in first- and final-year undergraduate dental students in India. Design: Questionnaire Study Setting: BDS Students in four University dental colleges in India carried-out during 2013 and 2014. Subjects (materials and methods): The students (n = 614) were assessed using a pre-tested questionnaire. We estimated the level of dental anxiety by using the Modified-Dental-Anxiety-Scale (MDAS). ANCOVA and Mann-Whitney U, and Chi-squared contingency tests were employed to analyse the extensive dataset acquired. Univariate clustering analysis and principal component regression were also applied. Students had similar demographic and lifestyle patterns. Interventions: Assessments of the level of dental anxiety amongst undergraduate dental students Main outcome measures: Mean±SD MDAS scores for first- and final-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) students were acquired. Results: Six hundred and fourteen (n = 614) students from four dental colleges were included in this study. Seventy-seven % were female (n=478) and 23% were male (n=136). The mean age of the first- and final-year students were 18.31 and 21.54 years respectively. First-year BDS students had an increased level of dental anxiety (Mean±SD 12.96±4.00) compared to that of the final-year ones (10.54±3.41), a difference which was very highly statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusion(s): Dental anxiety was significantly higher amongst first year BDS students over that of final-year students. open access journal
  • Errors in DFT Integration Grids and Their Potential Impact on Chemical Shift Calculations
    Errors in DFT Integration Grids and Their Potential Impact on Chemical Shift Calculations Wilson, Philippe B.; Grootveld, M.; Kamerlin, S. C. L. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Benchtop NMR Spectroscopy and Spectral Analysis of the cis- and trans-Stilbene Products of the Wittig Reaction
    Benchtop NMR Spectroscopy and Spectral Analysis of the cis- and trans-Stilbene Products of the Wittig Reaction Edgar, Mark; Percival, Benita; Gibson, Miles; Masania, Jinit; Beresford, Ken; Wilson, Philippe B.; Grootveld, M. Benchtop NMR spectrometers are now becoming more widely employed in university teaching laboratories. These low-field instruments are increasingly used in reaction monitoring and product purity applications. NMR spectra obtained using these spectrometers (40–80 MHz) tend to suffer from significant overlap of signals when compared to those obtained at 300–400 MHz or above, and therefore, some reactions may be less suited to analysis using such benchtop systems. While some reactions can be modified to make them more amenable to analysis on low-field benchtop spectrometers, the fact remains that many common undergraduate laboratory chemistry reactions remain as a stalwart of the university education system. Therefore, there is currently a major requirement for benchtop NMR analysis to improve in order to facilitate student understanding. Herein, it is demonstrated that a combination of spectral analysis and simulation at low-fields (40–80 MHz) allows the fine structure of second-order effects and overlapping spectra to be deduced, enabling an improved understanding of the low-field benchtop NMR technique within undergraduate student cohorts. The evolution of well-resolved and distinct multiplets at 400 MHz to complex, overlapping multiplets at 40–80 MHz also serves as a useful guide for laboratory demonstrators and academic staff when explaining the advantages of such benchtop systems. The Wittig reaction has been a standard reaction practical session in many university teaching laboratories since the 1980s, the products of which are a mixture of cis- and trans-stilbenes. This reaction serves as an ideal example of how benchtop NMR spectrometers and analysis can support chemistry teaching laboratories. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Molecular Composition of and Potential Health Benefits Offered by Natural East African Virgin Sunflower Oil Products: A 400 MHz 1H NMR Analysis Study
    Molecular Composition of and Potential Health Benefits Offered by Natural East African Virgin Sunflower Oil Products: A 400 MHz 1H NMR Analysis Study Percival, B.; Savel, Etienne; Ampem, G.; Gibson, M.; Edgar, Mark; Jafari, F.; Frederick, Kianna; Woodason, Katy; Wilson, Philippe B.; Grootveld, M. Objectives: Sunflower oil (SFO) is regularly employed for cosmetic, emollient and food frying purposes, the latter representing its foremost use globally. Therefore, full investigations of the molecular composition and quality of sunflower oil products are a major requirement. In this study, high-field 1H NMR analysis was employed to explore the molecular composition and authenticities of East African virgin (EAV) SFO products, particularly their acylglycerol fatty acid contents, together with those of selected minor constituents. Results acquired were statistically compared to those acquired on commercially-available, EU-approved refined SFO products via NMR-linked multivariate chemometrics strategies. Methodology: High-field 1H NMR spectra of EAV and refined SFOs (n = 55 and 4 respectively) were acquired at an operating frequency of 400 MHz. Their triacylglycerol fatty acid, triacylglycerol hydrolysis product, and sterol and stanol contents were determined via intelligent frequency bucketing and electronic integration of selected resonances. Univariate analysis-of-variance, and multivariate ROC curve evaluations were conducted to determine the magnitude and statistical significance of analyte concentration differences between these two sample classifications. Further multivariate NMR-linked chemometrics analyses such as principal component, random forest and support vector machine classification analyses were also utilised for this purpose. Key Results: Multicomponent 1H NMR analysis demonstrated that EAV SFOs had significantly higher and lower contents of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), respectively, than those of refined SFOs. Furthermore, significantly higher concentrations of ‘health-friendly’, cholesterol-blocking sterols and stanols were also found in these virgin products. Major Conclusions: 1H NMR analysis provides much valuable molecular information regarding the composition and virginal status of SFOs. The high [MUFA]:[PUFA] content ratio of unrefined EAV SFO products renders them more suitable and safer for commercial or domestic deep-frying episodes than refined SFOs (MUFAs are much more resistant to thermally-induced peroxidation than PUFAs). These products also potentially offer valuable health benefits in view of their high natural sterol and stanol contents. open access article
  • Toxic aldehyde generation in and food uptake from culinary oils during frying practices: peroxidative resistance of a monounsaturate-rich algae oil
    Toxic aldehyde generation in and food uptake from culinary oils during frying practices: peroxidative resistance of a monounsaturate-rich algae oil Moumtaz, S.; Percival, B.C.; Parmar, D.; Grootveld, K.; Jansson, P.; Grootveld, M. Human ingestion of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes potentially induces deleterious health effects, and high concentrations of these secondary lipid oxidation products (LOPs) are generated in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-rich culinary oils during high temperature frying practices. Here, we explored the peroxidative resistance of a novel monounsaturate-rich algae frying oil (MRAFO) [1] during laboratory-simulated shallow- and domestically-based repetitive deep-frying episodes (LSSFEs and DBRDFEs respectively), the latter featuring potato chip fryings. Culinary frying oils underwent LSSFEs at 180oC, and DBRDFEs at 170oC: aldehydes were determined by 1H NMR analysis in samples collected at increasing heating/frying time-points. Fast food restaurant-fried potato chip serving (FFRPCS) aldehyde contents were also monitored. Substantially lower levels of aldehydes were generated in the MRAFO product than those observed in PUFA-richer oils during LSSFEs. Toxicologically-significant concentrations of aldehydes were detected in FFRPCSs, and potato chips exposed to DBRDFEs when using a PUFA-laden sunflower oil frying medium: these contents increased with augmented deep-frying episode repetition. FFRPCS aldehyde contents were 10-25 ppm for each class monitored. In conclusion, the MRAFO product generated markedly lower levels of food-penetrative, toxic aldehydes than PUFA-rich ones during LSSFEs. Since FFRPCS and DBRDFE potato chip aldehydes are predominantly frying oil-derived, PUFA-deplete MRAFOs potentially offer health-friendly advantages. open access article
  • Progress in Low Field Benchtop NMR Spectroscopy in Chemical and Biochemical Analysis
    Progress in Low Field Benchtop NMR Spectroscopy in Chemical and Biochemical Analysis Grootveld, M.; Percival, B.C.; Osman, Y.; Edgar, Mark; Molinari, M.; Mather, M.L.; Casanova, F.; Wilson, Philippe B. The employment of spectroscopically-resolved NMR techniques as analytical probes have previously been both prohibitively expensive and logistically challenging in view of the large sizes of high-field facilities. However, with recent advances in the miniaturisation of magnetic resonance technology, low-field, cryogen-free “benchtop” NMR instruments are seeing wider use. Indeed, these miniaturised spectrometers are utilised in areas ranging from food and agricultural analyses, through to human biofluid assays and disease monitoring. Therefore, it is both intrinsically timely and important to highlight current applications of this analytical strategy, and also provide an outlook for the future, where this approach may be applied to a wider range of analytical problems, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Low-Field, Benchtop NMR Spectroscopy as a Potential Tool for Point-of-Care Diagnostics of Metabolic Conditions: Validation, Protocols and Computational Models
    Low-Field, Benchtop NMR Spectroscopy as a Potential Tool for Point-of-Care Diagnostics of Metabolic Conditions: Validation, Protocols and Computational Models Percival, B.C.; Grootveld, M.; Gibson, M.; Osman, Y.; Molinari, M.; Jafari, F.; Sahota, T. S.; Martin, M.; Casanova, F.; Mather, M.L.; Edgar, M.; Masania, J.; Wilson, Philippe B. Novel sensing technologies for liquid biopsies offer promising prospects for the early detection of metabolic conditions through omics techniques. Indeed, high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) facilities are routinely used for metabolomics investigations on a range of biofluids in order to rapidly recognise unusual metabolic patterns in patients suffering from a range of diseases. However, these techniques are restricted by the prohibitively large size and cost of such facilities, suggesting a possible role for smaller, low-field NMR instruments in biofluid analysis. Herein we describe selected biomolecule validation on a low-field benchtop NMR spectrometer (60 MHz), and present an associated protocol for the analysis of biofluids on compact NMR instruments. We successfully detect common markers of diabetic control at low-to-medium concentrations through optimised experiments, including α-glucose (≤2.8 mmol/L) and acetone (25 µmol/L), and additionally in readily accessible biofluids, particularly human urine. We present a combined protocol for the analysis of these biofluids with low-field NMR spectrometers for metabolomics applications, and offer a perspective on the future of this technique appealing to ‘point-of-care’ applications. open access article
  • Methylphenidate alters monoaminergic and metabolic pathways in the cerebellum of adolescent rats
    Methylphenidate alters monoaminergic and metabolic pathways in the cerebellum of adolescent rats Quansah, Emmanuel; Ruiz-Rodado, Victor; Grootveld, M.; Zetterstrom, T. S. C. Abnormalities in the cerebellar circuitry have been suggested to contribute to some of the symptoms associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH) is the major drug for treating this condition. Here, the effects of acute (2.0 mg/kg and 5.0 mg/kg) and chronic (2.0 mg/kg, twice daily for 15 days) MPH treatments were investigated in adolescent (35-40 days old) rats on monoaminergic and metabolic markers in the cerebellum. Data acquired indicates that acute MPH treatment (2.0 mg/kg) decreased cerebellar vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) density, while chronic treatment caused an increase. In contrast, protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the dopamine D1 receptor were not significantly altered by neither acute nor chronic MPH treatment. In addition, while chronic but not acute MPH treatment significantly enhanced dopamine turnover (DOPAC/dopamine) in the cerebellum, levels of dopamine and homovanillic acid (HVA) were not altered. Acute MPH (5.0 mg/kg) significantly modified levels of a range of cerebellar metabolites with similar trends also detected for the lower dose (2.0 mg/kg). In this regard, acute MPH tended to decrease cerebellar metabolites associated with energy consumption and excitatory neurotransmission including glutamate, glutamine, N-acetyl aspartate, and inosine. Conversely, levels of some metabolites associated with inhibitory neurotransmission, including GABA and glycine were reduced by acute (5.0 mg/kg) MPH, together with acetate, aspartate and hypoxanthine. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that MPH alters cerebellar biochemistry, and that this effect depends on both dose and duration of treatment. The therapeutic significance of these results requires further investigation. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link
  • Twelve Hour Longevity of the Oral Malodor-Neutralizing Capacity of an Oral Rinse Product Containing the Chlorine Dioxide Precursor Sodium Chlorite
    Twelve Hour Longevity of the Oral Malodor-Neutralizing Capacity of an Oral Rinse Product Containing the Chlorine Dioxide Precursor Sodium Chlorite Grootveld, Kerry; Lynch, Edward; Grootveld, M. Objectives: The objectives of this investigation were to investigate the effectiveness and longevity of an oral rinse product containing 0.10% (w/v) of the chlorine dioxide precursor sodium chlorite (1) on oral malodor in participants throughout a 12 h daylight diurnal cycle. Materials and methods: Thirty healthy participants (17 male, 13 female) were recruited to the study. Volatile sulfur compound levels (VSCs: H2S, CH3SH and (CH3)2S) were simultaneously monitored in their oral cavity air samples both before (0 h) and at 0.33, 4, 8 and 12 h after using the above oral rinse, or water as a negative control (participants refrained from oral hygiene measures during this 12 h period). The experimental design for this cross-over investigation was a mixed model ANOVA-based system incorporating treatments, sampling time-points and participants, together with their first-order interactions, as components of variance. Results: Results acquired demonstrated that the oral rinse formulation effectively suppressed VSC production in the oral environment for 12 h periods (p<0.0001, 0.0001 and 0.002 for H2S, CH3SH and (CH3)2S respectively). Mean 0 vs 12 h reductions in oral cavity H2S and CH3SH concentrations were much greater than those observed for the H2O negative control (p<10-8), but not so for (CH3)2S. Principal component analysis (PCA) a H2S/CH3SH linear combination and (CH3)2S alone significantly loaded on the first and second separate orthogonal components respectively, an observation confirming differing sources for these variable sets. Conclusions: The oral rinse explored effectively blocked VSC production in the oral cavity for a period of 12 h. This extended efficacy duration is likely to be ascribable to the ability of its active ClO2- ingredient to exert a combination of biochemical (direct VSC- and amino acid VSC precursor-consuming) and microbicidal actions in vivo. Clinical relevance: The 12 h longevity of product’s# oral malodor-neutralizing actions is of much clinical significance in view of the involvements of VSCs, particularly CH3SH, in the pathogenesis of gingivitis and periodontitis open access article
  • Detection and Determination of Methanol and Further Potential Toxins in Human Saliva Collected from Cigarette Smokers: A 1H NMR Investigation
    Detection and Determination of Methanol and Further Potential Toxins in Human Saliva Collected from Cigarette Smokers: A 1H NMR Investigation Percival, B.; Wann, A.; Masania, J.; Sinclair, J.; Sullo, N.; Grootveld, M. Introduction/Objectives: The deleterious health effects of tobacco smoking are now widely recognized and documented. High-resolution 1 H NMR analysis of human saliva provides a high level of valuable molecular information regarding the nature and levels of a wide range of both endogenous and exogenous agents therein. This investigation focused on the detection of molecular modifications to the salivary 1H NMR profiles of cigarette smokers following smoking of a single cigarette product. Methods: Cigarette-smoking human participants (6 female, 7 male) provided saliva samples both prior and subsequent to smoking a single cigarette (the former following a 12 hr. overnight fasting/smoking-abstention period). A group of n = 7 non-smoking controls also provided saliva samples before and after a 4.0 min. ‘smoking mimic’ time period.1 H NMR analysis of supernatants derived therefrom was conducted at an operating frequency of 400 MHz. Results: 1H NMR analysis revealed that single cigarette smoking episodes gave rise to substantial increases in the salivary concentrations of methanol (p<10-6) and propane-1,2-diol (p = 2.0 x 10-4), i.e. ca. 40- and 3.2-fold escalations in their mean levels respectively; the identity of methanol was confirmed by GC-MS analysis. As expected, there were no modifications to these tobacco smoking marker levels in control group participants following a corresponding 4.0 min. non-smoking period. Conclusions: 1H NMR analysis of human saliva provided much valuable information on the infiltration of toxins and further agents from cigarette smoke into this biofluid. The marked elevations in salivary methanol levels observed are of much concern in view of its documented toxicological properties and adverse health effects. open access journal

Click here to view a full listing of Martin Grootveld's publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Biomolecular investigations of the aetiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases;
  • The role of ‘oxidative stress’ in the pathogenesis of human diseases;
  • The multicomponent high-resolution NMR analysis of biofluids and tissues for diagnostic, prognostic and forensic purposes;
  • Biomedical, bioanalytical and metabolomic investigations of oral diseases and the therapeutic activities of oral healthcare products;
  • The development and application of techniques for the monitoring of drugs of both clinical and forensic interest;
  • Synthesis, applications and mechanisms of action of drugs and metallodrugs;
  • Pharmacology and pharmacodynamics (both clinical and forensic aspects);
  • The biological and medicinal chemistry of reactive oxygen species (ROS), together with the detection and pathological significance of products derived from their reactions, both in vitro and in vivo;
  • Biological inorganic chemistry, for example the ‘speciation’ of metal ions in biofluids and tissues;
  • The development and testing of novel biomaterials and biosensors;
  • Bio- and chemometrics, and metabolomics, including NMR-based exploratory data analysis and pattern recognition techniques;
  • Design, development and testing of metal alloy oral and joint prostheses;
  • The experimental design of clinical trials and statistical analysis of data derived therefrom;
  • Research ethics of clinical investigations.

Areas of teaching

Delivery of lectures on Clinical Trials, Statistical Analysis of Experimental Data, Chemical Pathology, Bioanalytical and Analytical Chemistry, and Biomedical Materials; Module Leader for Forensic Science Module ‘Molecules Have Fingerprints Too’.

Qualifications

  • Fellowship of the Royal Society of Chemistry
  • Fellowship of the Society of Biology
  • Chartered Biologist
  • Fellowship of the Institute of Biomedical Sciences
  • Fellowship of the Royal Statistical Society.

Courses taught

BSc Forensic Science (Molecules have Fingerprints Too)

Honours and awards

  • Prof. Grootveld is the author of 109 full, refereed research publications in reputable international scientific and/or clinical journals, 17 reviews and more than 200 refereed conference contributions. Since 1987, he has attracted more than £5,700,000 of external research funding.
  • Honorary Associate Clinical Professor at Warwick Medical and Dental School, University of Warwick for a 3-year period.
  • Visiting Professor of Clinical Chemistry at Queen’s University Belfast from 2001-2005.
  • Organised and chaired the very first international symposium regarding the applications of high-resolution NMR techniques to the oral science area (IADR conference, New Orleans, USA, March 2007).

Membership of external committees

Member of the European Tooth-Whitening Committee.

Membership of professional associations and societies

  • Fellowship of the Society of Biology and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
  • Member of the Institute of Biomedical Sciences

Conference attendance

More than 200 refereed conference contributions.

Consultancy work

Consultant for a very wide range of healthcare, oral healthcare, pharmaceutical and food companies/corporation.

Current research students


Student

 

Mode 

     


Supervisory Status
    

     

University                  

 Dates 

                                Project Title             

          Current Status  
Vijay

F/T

Second University of Bolton

06/11-06/15

Design and Development of (1) the Next Generation of Prosthetic Veins and  Arteries and (2) Biomarker Sensors for Application in Cardiovascular Diseases Thesis to be submitted shortly
Andras Weber

F/T

First University of Bolton

03/10-12/15

1H NMR-Linked Targeted Metabolomics Investigations of Human Saliva  Thesis to be submitted shortly
Omer Aziz

F/T

First De Montfort University 

04/12-04/15

An Exploration of the Practice of Prescribing and Use of Medicines, with a Special Focus on Self-Medication Practices in the Context of Developing Reform within the Healthcare System in Kurdistan-Iraq In progress (nearing completion)
Victor Ruiz Rodado

F/T

First De Montfort University 

09/13-08/16

New Developments in 1H NMR-linked Metabolomics: Identification of New Bi8omarkers for the Prognostic Stratification of Hodgkin's Lympoma and the Metabolomic Classification of Niemann-Pick Disease Class C In progress (nearing completion)
Pushpa Upreti

F/T

Second De Montfort University  09/12-09/15 Modified Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) Catalyst for the Oxidative Decomposition of  Organic Pollutants in  Wastewater In progress
Mamadou Bamba

F/T

First De Montfort University 01/14-01/17 Development and Application of Novel Computational Intelligence Techniques (CITs) to the Multivariate Analysis of Metabolomic Biofluid and Phytochemical Datasets  In progress
Tracey Lennemann

P/T

First De Montfort University 03/14-03/18 Sustainable Delivery Methods for (‘Grass-Roots’) Oral Health Promotion (OHP) in Children: A Longitudinal Study involving NGO and Rural Community Groups in India In progress
Pamela Hardaker

F/T

Second De Montfort University 09/14-09/17 Detection of Movement State using a Computational Intelligence-Based Sensor Fusion System Towards the Real-Time Control of Existing Microprocessor- Controlled Prosthetic Leg Devices Commenced 10/14
Paris Connelly

F/T

Second De Montfort University 09/14-09/17 Exploring the Birth Experiences of Women with Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and Midwives Commenced 10/14
Aamir Hussain

F/T

Second De Montfort University 09/14-09/17 Development and Testing of Novel Anti-Angiogenic Compounds Commenced 10/14
Getrude Chikura

F/T

Second De Montfort University 01/14-01/17 Development and Validation of a New Simple, Easy- to-use and Fit- for-Purpose Assessment Tool for the Clinical Diagnosis of Familial Breast Cancer In Progress

Georgina Benson

F/T

First De Montfort University 10/14-09/17 Development of Novel Nanosponge-Based Methods for the Detection and Quantification of Drugs in Biofluids and Surface Waters   Commenced 10/14

Isse Ali

F/T

Second De Montfort University 01/13/- 01/16 Clustering-Based Bioinformatics Approach for Analysis and Prediction of DNA  Methylation in Healthy and Diseased Tissues In progress near completion 

Benita Percival

F/T

First De Montfort University 10/15 - 09/18

Investigations of the Metabolism of First- and Second-Generation Statins using High-Resolution 19F and 1H NMR Analysis: Applications to Explore the Influence of Exercise Training Regimens

Commencing 10/15

Lucy Owen

F/T

Second De Montfort University 10/15 - 09/18

Development of Novel Synergistic Therapeutic Strategies to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance:

Critical Roles for Natural Products

Commencing 10/15

Kingsley Nwosu

F/T

First De Montfort University 10/15 - 09/18

Gaussian Process Models for Classification Purposes: Applications to the Analysis of Multidimensional Metabolomics and Chemometrics Datasets

Commencing 

10/15

Israa Anwer  Mohammedjumaah 

F/T

First De Montfort University 02/16 - 01/19

Metabolomics Investigations of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors (Tobacco Smoking, Diabetes and Obesity)

Commencing 02/16

                                                                                                                                                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Externally funded research grants information

Grant Holder(s)

Funding Body

Period of Award

Amount

Title of Project

Grootveld, M. (with M. Miraftab).

University of Bolton

2010-2014

£60K

PhD Studentship: Design and Development of (1) The Next Generation of Prosthetic Veins and Arteries and (2) Biomarker Sensors for Application in Cardiovascular Diseases

Grootveld, M.  (with M.

Henriques, G. M. B. Soares )  

 

 

 

Fundaco para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT)

 

2009-2013

€75K 

Development of a New Anti-Microbial Fabric for Wound Dressings

Grootveld, M.

HEIF_5 Award

2013

£14K

Design and Formulation of Novel, Dual-Compartment, Non-Erosive Tooth-Whitening Products which Generate Chlorine Dioxide In Situ

Grootveld, M. (with R Arroo and M Edgar):

HEIF_5 Award

2013-2014

£30K

Establishment and Development of a Novel, Commercially-Viable Analytical/Bioanalytical Service System at Leicester School of Pharmacy. 

Grootveld M. 

Science Without Borders Post-Doctoral Research Award (12 months)

2014 (pending)

£23K

Evaluation of the Abilities of Antioxidants and Desensitising Agents to Diminish Post-Bleaching Tooth Sensitivity.

Grootveld, M.

UK and EU Industry: Healthcare Corporations

2013-2015

£44K

A range of Metabolomic Investigations of the Therapeutic Actions of Oral Healthcare Products

Grootveld M. HEIF Proof of Principle Award 2013-2014 £22K Investigations of the Tooth-Whitening Activities of Novel Chlorine Dioxide-Generating Systems at Neutral or Near-Neutral pH Values: A Clinical Trial to Evaluate their Efficacies at the Cervical, Body and Incisal Tooth Sites  
Grootveld M. HEIF DMU Collaborative Award 2013-2014 £20K Development and Application of Novel Computational Intelligence Techniques (CITs) to the Multivariate Analysis of Metabolomics Datasets  
Grootveld M. (with D. Sillence, F. Platt and D. Elizondo)  SPARKS Children’s Medical Research Charity   2014-2015 £51K Identification of Novel Biomarker Patterns for the Metabolomics Classification of Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease and its Response to Treatment
Grootveld M. (with M. Dyer and S. Wagner) Hope Against Cancer Charity 2014-2016 £35K Identification of Biomarkers for Improved Prognosis of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: A Pilot Investigation 

Internally funded research project information

Grant Holder(s)

Funding Body

Period of Award

Amount

Title of Project

Grootveld, M. (with R. Prasad and A. Farooqui).

 

DMU RCIF Award

2012-2014

£30K

Spectroscopy-Linked Multivariate Chemometric Investigations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in Leicester.

Grootveld, M. (with D. Sillence).

 

 

DMU FHLS SMALL PROJECTS SCHEME

2013

£5K

Metabolic Classification of Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease.

Grootveld, M. (with D. Sillence)

 

DMU FEES-ONLY SCHOLARSHIP AWARD

2013-2016

£12.4K

Development of Novel Strategies for the Analysis of Multivariate 1H NMR Datasets

Grootveld, M.  (with K. Huddersman and E. Jaroszkiewicz)

CARTER-GUNN FELLOWSHIP AWARD

2013

£8K

1NMR and HPLC Investigations of the Gamma-Irradiation Sterilisation of Drugs

Grootveld M. (with S. Handsley and M. Larkin) DMU High-Flyers PhD Scholarship 2014-2017 £59.5K Exploring the Birth Experiences of Women with Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and Midwives
Grootveld M (with M. Maafi) DMU Full-Bursary PhD Scholarship 2014-2017 £55K Development of Novel Nanosponge-Based Methods for the Detection and Quantification of Drugs in Biofluids and Surface Waters  
Elizondo D, Passow B, and Grootveld M. DMU High-Flyers PhD Scholarship 2014-2017 £59.5K Detection of Movement State using a Computational Intelligence-Based Sensor Fusion System Towards the Real-Time Control of Existing Microprocessor- Controlled Prosthetic Leg Devices
Fretwell L, Rupareila K, Arroo R and Grootveld M. DMU Fees-Only PhD Scholarship 2014-2017 £12.6K Development and Testing of Novel Anti-Angiogenic Compounds
Rushworth J, Morris M, Fretwell L, Grootveld M, Slater, A, Dunford L, Sillence D.

DMU RCIF2 Award

2014-2017 £77.6K

Cell Imaging and Analysis (CIA) Facility: IlluminatingSustainable,World-ClassCollaborations in

Cell-Based Research

Huddersman K, Grootveld M, Arroo, R. 

DMU RCIF2 Award

 
2014-2017  

£55.5K 

Applications of a Novel Benchtop ESR Facility for the Rapid, ‘On-Site’ Analysis of Free Radicals and Transition Metal Ions in Clinical, Environmental and Food Samples.  

Grootveld M, Jaroszkiewicz E, Edgar, M, Taylor J.

DMU Fees-Only PhD Scholarship

2015-2018 £13K Investigations of the Metabolism of First- and Second-Generation Statins using High-Resolution 19F and 1H NMR Analysis: Applications to Explore the Influence of Exercise Training Regimens
Laird K, Grootveld M, Arroo  R. DMU Fees-Only PhD Scholarship 2015-2018   Development of Novel Synergistic Therapeutic Strategies to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance:Critical Roles for Natural Products 

Professional esteem indicators

Editorship of Reputable Scientific and Clinical Journals:

Member of the Editorial Boards of Current Metabolomics; International Journal of Medical and Clinical ResearchBio- Analytical Technique; SOJ Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences; Guest Editor for Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.

PhD students currently supervised by Professor Grootveld