Dr Muyiwa Oyinlola

Job: Director of IESD and Associate Professor in Engineering for Sustainable Development

Faculty: Computing, Engineering and Media

School/department: School of Engineering and Sustainable Development

Research group(s): Institute of Energy & Sustainable Development (IESD)

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0) 116 257 7162

E: muyiwa.oyinlola@dmu.ac.uk

W: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/mao

 

Personal profile

Dr. Muyiwa Oyinlola is an Associate Professor  (Engineering for Sustainable Development) and Chartered Engineer who is committed to engineering sustainable solutions for  low and middle  income countries. He holds a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering, MSc in Renewable Energy Engineering and a PhD in Sustainable Thermal Energy.

 One of the main areas of his research focusses on building capacity of local skills to engineer and use local materials for tackling global challenges. His work places particular emphasis on identifying and integrating socio-cultural considerations required for the long-term success of engineering projects. Some of his recent research projects in this area include building capacity for sustainable homes and developing processes and products that promote upcycling and recycling of plastics in low income communities.

 Another strand of Muyiwa's research is focussed on advancing low carbon technologies that will contribute to sustainably bridging the wide global energy gap. He works on optimising and developing clean and affordable energy technologies for low income communities. Some of his work in this area include investigating opportunities for renewables to support weak grids, improving the energy performance of buildings, thermal energy storage and waste heat recovery.

 Dr Oyinlola has led multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary, international consortia in writing, wining and successfully executing research bids. Muyiwa often works with transdisciplinary teams, that include social scientist, user centred designers as well as field practitioners, to ensure that project outcomes are interdisciplinary and cover both technical and social factors. He has worked with partners from several countries including Nigeria, India, Kenya, Ghana, South Africa and the United States of America.

Research group affiliations

Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development

Publications and outputs

  • Experimental Investigation of a locally fabricated low-cost solar parabolic trough in Thailand
    Experimental Investigation of a locally fabricated low-cost solar parabolic trough in Thailand Limboonruang, Teerapath; Phunapai, Nittalin; Oyinlola, M.A. The current political tensions resulting in sharp increases in oil and gas prices, has further highlighted the need for energy independence by nations. Renewable energy technologies are one way of achieving this, so countries need to focus on developing indigenous technology to harness renewable energy. This study focuses on developing a solar parabolic trough collector for Thailand. Solar energy is a renewable energy source that can be used indefinitely. It will also play an increasingly important role in the future energy structure. Solar Parabolic Trough (SPT) is a device that has a curved shape of cylindrical parabolic. It consists of a shiny surface to reflect sun radiations towards the focal point. There are several factors that can affect the performance of the solar parabolic trough such as the accuracy of the sun model, the reflection of the sun radiation, fluid flow, the heat transfer to fluid and so on. The latter absorbs the incoming radiations and transforms them into thermal energy. This study experimentally investigates the thermal performance of a Solar Parabolic Trough collector with a sun tracking system designed for the Thai contexts. A set of three Solar Parabolic Trough (SPT) were designed and built in Srinakharinwirot University (SWU). Each had a focal length of 300 mm; length 5.1 m. Water was used as the working fluid circulated through a 60 litres water tank. Experiments were run at five (5) different flow rates of 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 litres per minute. Located at the parabolic troughs focal point is the vacuum tube collector which consists of a 10 mm smooth copper tube, enclosed in 47 mm diameter sealed glass tube. Type K Thermocouples were used to measure the temperatures at different points in the fluid and recorded using a data logger, and a sun tracking system was used for controlling stepping motors in the solar parabolic trough. Experiments were run over 5 days between 10:00 – 16:00 Nakhon-Nayok city, Thailand. Solar radiation during the period ranged between 462.60 – 1021.59 W/m2 (average 800.86 W/m2 ) and ambient temperature ranged from 36.54 – 39.17 °C (average 38.48 °C). The results showed that the water flow rate had an inverse relationship with the efficiency of the solar parabolic trough. The flow rate of 0.5 liters per minute resulted in the highest temperature of 56.70 °C and the maximum total rate of heat transfer was 955.65 W. The maximum efficiency was observed to be about 12%. This low efficiency is similar to what has been observed in similar studies. Overall, the study shows promising performance results for the deployment of locally made solar parabolic trough collector in Thailand. Limboonruang T., Phunapai, N. and Oyinlola M. A (2022) Experimental Investigation of a locally fabricated low-cost solar parabolic trough in Thailand. The 16th International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics (HEFAT2022),
  • Modelling Heat Transfer in an Extruder for Recycling Plastics into Filaments for use in Additive Manufacturing
    Modelling Heat Transfer in an Extruder for Recycling Plastics into Filaments for use in Additive Manufacturing Nasr Azadani, Meysam; Akinlabi, Esther; Whitehead, Timothy; Oyinlola, M.A. Global production of plastic increased by 500% over the last 30 years and it is expected to continue to grow to 850 million tons/year by 2050. Plastic use results in a substantial environmental burden due to both land and water pollution as plastics take 10 to 450 years to decompose in landfills. This has resulted in increased calls for innovative ways to recycle plastics, one of which is a decentralised solution where wasted plastics are recycled into filaments for 3D printing. This has been identified as a promising solution, especially for low-income communities in the global south where waste management infrastructure is inadequate. However, studies have highlighted the need for more research and development in the extruder design and operation, especially in terms of optimising temperature distribution and the cooling rate in order to prevent poor filament quality and inconsistent filament diameter. This paper describes the modelling of the temperature distribution and cooling rate of an extruder. The innovation is that the extruder is designed to be built and operated in low-income settings of the global south using locally available materials and skills. The aim of the work is to develop a mathematical model for evaluating the thermal distribution in the extruder as well as optimise the cooling rate conditions. The model is useful for optimising the operating conditions such as ambient temperature, extrusion temperature, extrusion speed, cooling rate and spooling mechanism. Nasr Azadani M, Akinlabi E.T, Whitehead T. and Oyinlola , M.A. (2022) Modelling Heat Transfer in an Extruder for Recycling Plastics into Filaments for use in Additive Manufacturing, The 16th International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics (HEFAT2022).
  • Thermal Characterisation of composite walls made from waste Materials
    Thermal Characterisation of composite walls made from waste Materials Messahel, Bilal; Onyenokporo, Nwakaego; Beizaee, Arash; Oyinlola, M.A. Sustainable development has been an ever-growing global concern over the years, especially with respect to the environment. The construction sector is a major cause for concern due to the devastating effects traditional building materials, manufacturing processes and procurement, have on the environment. Inadequate housing in developing countries is also another major sustainable development challenge. These illustrate the cogent need for developing new methods of delivering sustainable housing that can be accessible to low-income communities who have little or no access to finances. This study compares the thermal performance of low-cost building components made from incorporating waste materials in cement blocks, thereby reducing the quantity of new materials needed. Three samples (wall panels) were made. Each panel was 330mm × 330mm × 240mm and incorporated 25 × 500ml plastic bottles laid horizontally in rows. A sand and cement mixture (ratio 1:3) was used as a binder and filled the gaps between the plastic bottles. The bottles in the first sample were filled with sand, those in the second were filled with water, and those in the third with used plastic carrier bags. A guarded hot box was developed to experimentally measure the U-values of the samples following the BS EN ISO 8990 standards. It was observed that the samples with the plastic bags had the lowest U-value, about 60% lower than samples with sand. The results show a promising potential for low-grade plastic waste to be used as a means of improving the thermal performance of low-cost buildings. Messahel B., Onyenokporo N.C., Beizaee A. and Oyinlola M.A. (2022) Thermal Characterisation of composite walls made from waste Materials, The 16th International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics (HEFAT2022)
  • Developing transformative pedagogies for transdisciplinary education – Resources and competencies students need
    Developing transformative pedagogies for transdisciplinary education – Resources and competencies students need Adefila, Arinola; Chen, Yung-Fang; Chao, Chia-Ming; Oyinlola, M.A.; Anafi, Fatai International field trips provide opportunities for interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary learning experiences which can be transformative. Whilst these projects are becoming popular with increasing focus on internationalisation of the curriculum, tackling global challenges and encouraging student mobility, there is scant literature on the critical pedagogical approaches which support the design and delivery of transformative learning experiences. The study described herewith examined the transformative pedagogies used to facilitate learning during interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary field trips and placements. Objectives of the study included (1) evaluating the impact of two projects related to student interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary field trips; (2) identifying best practice of teaching and learning design; and (3) providing recommendations for future higher education (HE) arrangements. The findings show that transformative learning experiences must be carefully integrated into the design of international field trips, setting up pivotal learning moments and suitable challenges which enhance reflexivity, shared learning and problem-solving. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Adefila, A., Chen, Y-F., Chao, C-M., Oyinlola, M. and Anafi, F. (2022) Developing transformative pedagogies for transdisciplinary education – Resources and competencies students need. Innovations in Education and Teaching International,
  • Investigating the performance of a solar collector with plastic bottles as a glazing cover
    Investigating the performance of a solar collector with plastic bottles as a glazing cover Abdullahi, Muhammed; Oyinlola, M.A.; Ahmed, Abdulhafiz; Balogun, Muyideen Conventional flat plate collectors have found widespread use in both domestic and industrial applications. Despite the high potential for solar collectors in areas with enormous solar energy resource, one major factor limiting its uptake, most especially in low-income communities of sub-Saharan Africa, is its high initial cost. The replacement of flat glazing cover with transparent Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) plastic bottles has been identified as one way of minimising cost. PET bottles constitute a significant percentage of the waste stream and can be upcycled at no cost. This also contributes to reducing plastic waste in the environment. This study investigates the performance of a solar collector design with plastic bottles as glazing cover. The collector system simply consists of a serpentine arrangement of copper tubes inserted in PET bottles enclosed in an insulated casing. Aluminium foil sheet was used as diffuse reflector in order to maximise solar radiation captured by the absorber pipes. Experimental investigation of the system was carried out under ambient weather conditions in Zaria, Nigeria; Solar Irradiation ranged from 750 to 950 W/m2, ambient temperatures ranged from 20 to 32 °C and wind speed was in the range 0.5 to 3 m/s. The measurements were used to estimate the standard parameters for predicting and evaluating the performance of flat plate collectors such as the instantaneous efficiency. This analysis, which indicated promising performance results, is important for optimising design and operating parameters for this low-cost design of solar water heater. Abdullahi,M.B., Oyinlola, M.A., Ahmed, A. and Balogun, M.B. (2022) Investigating the performance of a solar collector with plastic bottles as a glazing cover. In: Proceedings of the 17th UK Heat Transfer Conference (UKHTC2021), Manchester, UK, 4th-6th April 2022.
  • The circularity divide: What is it? And how do we avoid it?
    The circularity divide: What is it? And how do we avoid it? Schroeder, Patrick; Oyinlola, M. A.; Anantharaman, Manisha; Barrie, Jack Supply chain volatility and the economic pressures brought about by Covid-19 has led European nations, the United States and China to adopt circularity as a domestic economic strategy. Their objectives are strengthening supply chains and resource security while boosting trade competitiveness. In this Perspective, we argue that if nations continue down the road of a unilateral and fragmented approach to the circular economy, not only will they fail to address domestic environmental problems, they will also create a phenomenon we term the ‘circularity divide’, thereby exacerbating global inequities. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Barrie, J., Anantharaman, M., Oyinlola, M. and Schröder, P. (2022) The circularity divide: What is it? And how do we avoid it?. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 180, 106208
  • Digital innovations for transitioning to circular plastic value chains in Africa
    Digital innovations for transitioning to circular plastic value chains in Africa Oyinlola, M. A.; Schroeder, Patrick; Whitehead, Timothy; Kolade, Oluwaseun; Wakunuma, Kutoma; Sharifi, Soroosh; Rawn, Barry; Odumuyiwa, Victor; Lendelvo, Selma; Brighty, Geoff; Tijani, Bosun; Jaiyeola, Tomi; Lindunda, Lukonga; Mtonga, Radhia; abolfathi, soroush The paper analyzes the current state of plastic value chains in Africa and the potential of digital innovations adopted by African entrepreneurs to contributing to a circular plastic economy. We provide an overview of plastic waste trade to African countries and an assessment of existing digital solutions that can support the transition to a circular plastic economy. The findings show that various digital innovations are being applied by entrepreneurs including web-based solutions, mobile apps and 3D printing. The case studies also show that multinational companies, especially consumer facing brands, are major players in the national plastic value chains in African countries, acting as seed funders for start-ups as well as buyers of recycled plastics. Current initiatives that are underway are positive signs that changes are in progress to address the environmental and social impacts of plastics value chains in Africa. However, to achieve a transition to sustainable circular value chains, changes at policy level will be required to enable scaling-up of local start-up businesses, address regulatory barriers to digital solutions, create markets for recycled plastic materials and implement extended producer responsibility regulations Centre for Enterprise and Innovation, Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility, The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Oyinlola, M., Schröder, P., Whitehead, T., Kolade, S., Wakunuma, K., Sharifi, S., Rawn, B., Odumuyiwa, V., Lendelvo, S., Brighty, G., Tijani, B., Jaiyeola, T., Lindunda, L., Mtonga, R., Abolfathi, S. (2021) Digital innovations for transitioning to circular plastic value chains in Africa. Africa Journal of Managment
  • Bottle House: Utilising Appreciative Inquiry to develop a user Acceptance model
    Bottle House: Utilising Appreciative Inquiry to develop a user Acceptance model Adefila, Arinola; Abuzeinab, Amal; Whitehead, Timothy; Oyinlola, M. A. This paper develops a novel user-acceptance model for circular solutions to housing design. The model has been systematically developed from a case study of an upcycled plastic bottle building in a low-income community in Nigeria. It is common practice to use participatory approaches to consult end-users in communities, typically after design concepts have been proposed and conceptualised. However, this often leads to critical sociocultural or usability elements being overlooked and the design being substandard. Therefore, this paper develops a robust model for designers, specialists and activists involved in construction that can be used during all phases of a project. This approach demonstrates that user needs should be considered before building designs and plans are generated, providing a greater frame of reference for practitioners, consultants and end-users. Enabling the integration of holistic needs of the community and the development of circular design solution. A case study methodology has been employed to develop this model, uses appreciative Inquiry methodology. This includes multiple methods to capture end-users perception; focus groups, interactions with the local community, and self-recorded comments. This case study is part of a broader research project to develop replicable low-cost self-sufficient homes utilising local capacity using upcycled, locally available materials. The findings identify the challenges associated with designing circular-solution housing without a robust understanding of interrelated factors, which ensure sustainability and user acceptance. The conclusions demonstrate why essential sociocultural factors, usually unrelated to technical development, should be understood and contextualised when designing sustainable solutions in Low/Middle-Income Communities. We argue that without this holistic approach, undesirable consequences may arise, often leading to more significant challenges. Instead of referring to multiple frameworks, this distinctive model can be used to evaluate user acceptance for low-cost housing in particular and other dimensions of circular solution design that involve end-user acceptance. The model blends circular solution dimensions with user-acceptance concerns; offering a guide that considers essential features that are both user-friendly and pragmatic; such as utility, technological innovation and functionality as well as their intersectionality. The research relied on a single case study, which focused on end-user engagement of upcycling waste materials as an application of circular solutions. The model will contribute to developing socially accepted circular solutions taking into consideration local context factors. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Adefila, A., Abuzeinab, A., Whitehead, T. and Oyinlola, M. (2020) Bottle house: utilising appreciative inquiry to develop a user acceptance model. Built Environment Project and Asset Management, 10 (4), pp. 567-583
  • A review of retrofit interventions for residential buildings in hot humid climates
    A review of retrofit interventions for residential buildings in hot humid climates Ayodele, Tunmise; Taki, A. H.; Oyinlola, M. A.; Bhattacharyya, Subhes Buildings consume 40% of resources around the world, low energy building is fast becoming a major component of sustainable development. However, limiting the concept of low energy buildings to new builds will only undermine its ef-fects and benefits as there are numerous existing buildings that consume uneconomical energy resources irrespective of how en-ergy efficient the new ones are. Therefore, retrofit interventions to existing buildings is important in decreasing resource con-sumption and increasing energy efficiency. Some various retro-fit interventions already exist towards reducing energy con-sumption in residential buildings but deciding on a specific ret-rofit intervention needs assiduous consideration. Hence, this pa-per focuses on the review of retrofit interventions and their en-ergy performances. It was found amongst others that clay bricks, sand line, and pre-fabricated walls consume less energy than concrete bricks by 16%, 23%, and 25% respectively. Elec-trochromic glazing system with no shading device was also found to have reduced heat gains by 53%-59% in winter and summer. It was concluded that further research would benefit from the combination of the various interventions to create pathways for building retrofit in hot humid climate, the path-ways can be tested with a dynamic thermal simulation software for energy performance. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. Ayodele, T.T., Taki, A.H., Oyinlola, M.A., Bhattacharyya, S. (2020) A review of retrofit interventions for residential buildings in hot humid climates. International Journal of Environment & Sustainable Development.
  • PVT based Solar Assisted Ground Source Heat Pump system: modelling approach and sensitivity analyses
    PVT based Solar Assisted Ground Source Heat Pump system: modelling approach and sensitivity analyses Sakellariou, Evangelos; Wright, A. J.; Axaopoulos, Petros; Oyinlola, M. A. A solar assisted ground source heat pump (SAGSHP) system is a promising technology which pairs two widely abundant renewable energy sources, solar and shallow geothermal. In space heating dominated regions, the addition of solar collectors to conventional ground source systems improves their feasibility. There are many aspects which influence the system’s efficiency; but experimentation to optimize these would requires high capital investment and take a very long time. Therefore, mathematical modeling and computer-based simulations are preferable methods to conduct sensitivity and feasibility analyses. In this work, a PVT based solar assisted ground source heat pump system was modeled using TRNSYS program, and sensitivity analyses were conducted. For the PVT collectors, an experimentally verified transient model was utilized, while experimental data were used to validate a novel very shallow borefield. For the heat pump model, manufacturer’s performance data along with a new novel method were combined, and a new component was created in the simulation platform. A single family dwelling with domestic hot water demand was assumed for the heating load, and weather data from Birmingham, West Midlands, UK was used. The simulation results were evaluated by utilizing the annual specific productivity metric rather than the systems seasonal performance factor, which is the current choice for SAGSHP systems. The proposed evaluation approach was found be capable of clarifying, in detail, the effect of the parametric variation on the system’s energy performance. The sensitivity analyses are focused on six parameters on the energy conversion side, with the heat pump’s evaporator as the physical boundary. It was found that the storage capacity and the plate heat exchanger’s effectiveness, contribute the most to the system’s and PVTs’ heat productivity. Whilst heat productivity depended more on the parameters’ variation, the power generation was influenced mainly by the collectors’ tilt. The results of this study are significant for design and operation of these systems. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Sakellariou, E.I., Wright, A.J., Axaopoulos, P. and Oyinlola, M.A. (2019) PVT based solar assisted ground source heat pump system: Modelling approach and sensitivity analyses, Solar Energy, 193, pp. 37-50

 Click for full list of Muyiwa Oyinlola research outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Circular Economy
  • Engineering for sustainable development
  • Plastic Waste Management in LMICs
  • Thermal energy storage
  • Thermal energy transformation
  • Heat transfer
  • Energy in emerging economies
  • Sustainable energy
  • Transdisicplinary  for International Development

Areas of teaching

  • Thermodynamics
  • Heat transfer
  • Fluid dynamics
  • Renewable energy

Qualifications

PhD Heat Transfer in Solar Absorber Plates with Micro-Channels, University of Warwick, 2012-2015

MSc Renewable Energy Engineering, Kingston University, London, 2010-2011

BEng Mechanical Engineering, Ahmadu Bello Univeristy, Zaria, 2002-2008

 

Courses taught

ENGD2101 Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

ENGT5141 Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

Membership of professional associations and societies

Institution of Mechanical Engineers

Energy Institute

Professional licences and certificates

Chartered Engineer

Projects

Wealth from Waste: Value added products for Chennai Waste Pickers 

The aim of the project is to assess the feasibility of using local skills and materials to transform waste plastics into filaments for 3D printing, which is identified as a high value item.  This study will document the current waste materials available, and current applications for processing waste plastic and creating 3D print material. This research would set the groundwork for future studies and enable the development of new circular economy business models, underpinned with novel technological innovation. 

Low Cost Sustainable Housing Research 

The project explores utilizing up-cycled and locally engineered materials to design affordable, self-sufficient homes for low income communities. The research aims to establish scientific methods to co-design a self-sufficient home, integrated with inhouse-electricity generation, in-house-water-purification system, earthquake resistant foundation and walls as well as ensuring it is socially acceptable within the community.  Therefore the project addresses 3 of the United Nations goals for sustainable development. 

Goal 6- clean water and sanitation

Goal 7- Affordable and clean energy

Goal 11- sustainable cities and communities,

Conference attendance

1. Oyinlola , M.A. and Shire, G.S.F. (2016) Heat Transfer in Low Reynolds Number Flows Through Miniaturized Channels. The 12th International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics (HEFAT2016), Malaga, Spain

2. The 5th international conference on Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Microscale (HTFFM V), 22-26 April 2014, Marseille, France.  Analysis of temperature distribution in absorber plates with microchannels. Oyinlola, M.A., Shire, G.S.F. and Moss, R. W. (2014) Oral Presentation (Peer Reviewed)

3. The 10th International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics (HEFAT2014), 14 - 16 July 2014, Orlando, USA. Investigating the effects of channel aspect ratio on fluid flow and heat transfer  in absorber plates with minichannels.  Oyinlola , M.A., Shire, G.S.F. , Moss, R. W. and Khaliji Oskouei, M (2014). Oral Presentation (Peer Reviewed)

4. The 13th UK Heat Transfer Conference (UKHTC), 2- 3 September 2013, London, UK. Investigating Heat transfer in Absorber plates with mini channels. Oyinlola, M.A. and Shire, G.S.F. (2013). Oral presentation (Peer Reviewed).

Current research students

  1. Bilal Messahel - Investigating the potential of waste materials to construct low energy, thermally comfortable dwellings for low income communities.  October 2018 – date.  1st Supervisor
  2. Salisu Isihak - Technology Options for Improving Access to Energy Services in Areas With Low Electricity Access Rate: A Geographic Information System (GIS) Based Approach to Electricity Planning in Nigeria. April 2018 – date  2nd Supervisor
  3. Tunmise Timothy Ayodele - A Framework for Low carbon retrofitting of Residential Buildings in Nigeria. January  2017 – date,  2nd Supervisor
  4. Longinus Ogugua - Application of Terahertz Spectroscopy in In-Process Monitoring of Freeze-Drying Process: An Optimization Study of Process Analytical Technology. January  2017 – date, 2nd Supervisor
  5. Evangelos Sakellariou - Feasibility study and parametric analyses of Solar Assisted Ground Sourced Heat Pump systems for different European climate zones. January  2017 – date, 2nd Supervisor

Externally funded research grants information

 

Circular Plastic Economy Innovation Hub, British Council ( Innovation for African Universities Programme) Role - Principal-investigator September 2021 – September 2022, £60,000

Digital Innovations for Transitioning to a Circular Plastic Economy (DITCh Plastic) EPSRC-GCRF. Role - Principal-investigator May 2020 – Oct 2021,  £146,238 - https://ditch-plastic.org/

Circular Plastic: Utilising frontier technology and user centred design to add value to plastic waste, facilitating entrepreneurship and employment EPSRC-GCRF. Role - Co-investigator Jun 2020 – Nov 2021,  £150,000 -https://www.circularplastic.co/

Sustainability, inclusiveness and governance of mini-grids in Africa (SIGMA) - ESRC-GCRF. Role - Co-investigator March 2020 – March 2023,  £1,244,000 - https://www.sigma-gcrf.net/

Assessing the informal waste sector contribution to Nepal’s circularity transition - Royal academy of engineering   Frontiers of Engineering for Development Seed funding  - Role -  Co investigator -Aug 2020 – Mar 2022, £20,000

Wealth from Waste: Value added products for Chennai Waste Pickers - Royal academy of engineering   Frontiers of Engineering for Development Seed funding  - Role -  Principal investigator -June 2018 – June 2019, £30,000

Blackout-Chasing: Tapping Peri-Urban Energy Perspectives, Preferences and Prospects, Royal academy of engineering   Frontiers of Engineering for Development Seed funding  - Role -  Co Investigator – February 2017 – February 2018, £20,000

Developing local capacity for building affordable self-sufficient homes - Royal academy of engineering   Frontiers of Engineering for Development Seed funding  - Role -  Principal investigator – November 2016 – August 2017, £20,000 - http://lcshr.com/

Internally funded research project information

Principal Investigator: Low Cost Sustainable Home Prototype for Developing Countries (RIF Round 8, 01/08/16 - 31/07/17).Collaborators: Dr Tim Whitehead , Dr Amal Abuzeinab(DMU), Dr Farukh Farukh, Dr Karthikeyan Kandan

Principal Investigator: Low Cost Sustainable Housing in Ahmedabad. Collaborators: Dr Tim Whitehead , Dr Amal Abuzeinab(DMU), Dr Farukh Farukh, Dr Karthikeyan Kandan

Co Investigator: A perfect gap for SMILE: Smart Last-MILE Vaccine Cooling & Delivery System.Collaborators: Dr Karthikeyan Kandan,  Dr Farukh Farukh

Co Investigator: Application of Terahertz Spectroscopy for In-Process Monitoring of Freeze-Drying of Pharmaceutical Products. Collaborators: Professor Geoff Smith, Dr.Ahmet Orun,

Co Investigator:  Develop a device for monitoring the structure of the dry layer that develops in a product under-going the process of freeze-drying.  Collaborators: Professor Geoff Smith,  Dr.Ahmet Orun

MSc Student projects Supervision

Experimental study of a high performance solar flat plate collector

Characterising a lab scale thermal energy store for concentrated solar thermal collectors

Characterising the thermal performance of sustainable building components

Developing a low cost parabolic trough collector for process heat

Clean energy solution for powering and cooling off grid telecom shelters.

CFD optimization of a solar Flat plate collector

Heat and mass transfer analysis of a sustainable membrane distillation system

Awards

  1. British Council Researcher Links travel grant to attend the China-UK Workshop on Achieving the Low Carbon City in Shanghai, China between 14-16 June 2019
  2. DMU PhD high flyers Scholarship -  Investigating the potential of waste materials to construct low energy, thermally comfortable dwellings for low income communities - October 2018
  3. Vice Chancellors Future Research Leaders programme -  September 2018
  4. British Council Researcher Links travel grant to attend the workshop on Closed Loop Green Technologies for Rural Communities in Delhi India between 10-13 September 2017
  5. British Council Researcher Links travel grant to attend  the UK-China workshop on shaping low carbon energy future between 28-31 August 2017
  6. British Council Researcher Links travel grant to attend the workshop on Water, Sanitation and Energy Nexus Research Initiative, between13-16 September 2016.
  7. European Institute of Innovation and Technology Climate – KIC Pioneers into Practice programme. €8000 grant to contribute  to a low carbon product/service development in two European region April – October 2013
Muyiwa Oyinlola 2021