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Mr Jeremy Robson

Job: Senior Lecturer

Faculty: Business and Law

School/department: Leicester De Montfort Law School

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: 0116 366 4349

E: jeremy.robson@dmu.ac.uk

W: http://dmu.ac.uk

 

Personal profile

Jeremy Robson is an experienced practitioner and academic whose research centres on removing barriers to justice that exist in the rules of evidence.

Jeremy joined DMU in 2018. He was called to the Bar of England and Wales in 1999 and practised as a Barrister across the Midlands, specialising in criminal work. In 2008 he joined Nottingham Trent University. Whilst at NTU, he developed Europe’s first LLM in Advocacy Skills, a bespoke programme commissioned by the Attorney General of Malaysia. He also established and was director of the Centre for Advocacy as well as launching the International Advocacy Teaching Conference.

Jeremy’s research examines the barriers to justice which traditional rules of evidence create. He specialises in interdisciplinary research working with psychologists, linguists, phoneticians and criminologists. In 2019, Jeremy was part of a multidisciplinary team who received funding from the ESRC to develop a new procedure for police voice identification parades. His work on voice identification has been widely cited nationally and internationally.

Jeremy teaches Evidence on the LLB and Litigation and Advocacy on the professional programmes. He has experience in PhD supervision and is always willing to discuss potential supervisions with interested candidates.

Jeremy holds an LLM in Legal Practice, a Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. In 2020 Jeremy was appointed as a fee paid Tribunal Judge, assigned to the Social Entitlement Chamber.

 

Publications and outputs

Journal Articles

  • Women should be allowed to wear the niqab in court – here’s why
    Women should be allowed to wear the niqab in court – here’s why Robson, Jeremy open access journal
  • The veiled lodger - a reflection on the status of R v D
    The veiled lodger - a reflection on the status of R v D Robson, Jeremy At the time of writing this article (January 2016) some 28 months have elapsed since His Honour Judge Peter Murphy gave judgment in the case of R v D. His judgment, requiring a female defendant of the Muslim faith to remove her niqaab if she wished to give evidence in her own defence, was lauded as a paradigm of common sense by some and, an unwarranted interference with protected rights by others. The conservative press celebrated the fact that the institutional supremacy of the court had been preserved2 whilst the liberal press noted the judge had respected an individual’s right to wear the veil for the remainder of the proceedings. Despite HHJ Murphy having reservations about circuit judges being seen to set a precedent and his request that the issue be clarified at a higher level, R v D appears to have become settled as a statement of principle. This article will suggest that the implications and unanswered questions of R v D are such that the failure of the senior judiciary or legislature to intervene is unsatisfactory and that guidance, based on a robust evidence base is necessary. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. An open access version can be found by following the URI link
  • A fair hearing? The use of voice identification parades in criminal investigations in England and Wales
    A fair hearing? The use of voice identification parades in criminal investigations in England and Wales Robson, Jeremy This article reviews the current state of the law in relation to using voice identification parades to test the evidence of a witness who purports to recognise a witness by voice alone. Such procedures exist but are not used consistently by police forces, with some forces having decided as a matter of policy not to use them. Although such procedures are challenging and are more difficult that video identification procedures, the failure to conduct such a parade is a matter which should be properly taken into account in assessing the admissibility of a witness’s evidence. An open access copy of this article can be found by following the URI.
  • The Niqaab and the Myth of Pinocchio's Nose: Is the Niqaab an Impediment to Fact Finding in an Adversarial Trial? An Analysis of R v D
    The Niqaab and the Myth of Pinocchio's Nose: Is the Niqaab an Impediment to Fact Finding in an Adversarial Trial? An Analysis of R v D Robson, Jeremy Abstract: This article considers the current state of the law in respect of Muslim women who wish to wear the Niqaab while appearing in court. It reviews the approach of the courts in England and Wales to this issue cul-minating in the decision of R v D in September 2013 and compares this to the approach of other common law jurisdictions. The article considers whether the popular approach of placing the need to see the 'demeanour' of a witness above the right of that witness to manifest her religion is properly founded. The decision in R v D is discussed against the framework of article 9 of the European Convention of Human Rights and concludes that the requirement that it was neither necessary nor proportionate to place a precondition on the defendant in R v D that she removed her veil if she wished to testify in her own defence. An open access version of this output is available by following the URI
  • EU wildlife laws should be celebrated – and retained – not treated as red tape
    EU wildlife laws should be celebrated – and retained – not treated as red tape Robson, Jeremy This article discusses the approach to wildlife protection post-Brexit
  • Lend Me Your Ears: An Analysis Of How Voice Identification Evidence Is Treated In Four Neighbouring Criminal Justice Systems
    Lend Me Your Ears: An Analysis Of How Voice Identification Evidence Is Treated In Four Neighbouring Criminal Justice Systems Robson, Jeremy This article reviews the approaches taken by the courts to the admissibility of voice identification evidence in four jurisdictions; England and Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Each jurisdiction addresses the question in a different way and each approach is open to criticism. This paper will argue that a contextualised approach to the problem would allow for improvements which would enhance the quality of the evidence and the adjudicative process. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.
  • How to commit the perfect crime Designing teaching materials which develop storytelling abilities in trainee advocates
    How to commit the perfect crime Designing teaching materials which develop storytelling abilities in trainee advocates Robson, Jeremy; Edwards, Helen Storytelling is recognized as being central to the skills that an advocate needs to develop. This presentation explores how this can be developed through the design of teaching materials which force students into addressing this issue.
  • Caging the green-eyed monster – restrictions on the use of sexual infidelity as a defence to murder
    Caging the green-eyed monster – restrictions on the use of sexual infidelity as a defence to murder Robson, Jeremy; Edwards, Helen This case note discusses the Court of Appeal's interpretation of the defence of 'Loss of Control' in the case of Clinton, Parker and others. Full text can be found here https://www4.ntu.ac.uk/nls/document_uploads/130860.pdf
  • Prosecuting Coercive Control: Reforming Storytelling in the Courtroom
    Prosecuting Coercive Control: Reforming Storytelling in the Courtroom Robson, Jeremy; Bettinson, Vanessa The criminalisation of coercive control is a welcome development in ending violence against women. It has created an offence aimed at tackling the abuse of power and control within relationships. Despite this, however, there are indications that there is a high attrition rate in bringing prosecutions, notwithstanding the recognition by prosecuting authorities of the need to bring “evidence-led” prosecutions. In this paper we review the ways in which having an offence which is proved via a narrative account of a personal relationship can run into difficulties when faced with rules of evidence which have evolved in a justice system more used to dealing with incident-based offences. Although in many cases judicial discretion allows flexibility to overcome these problems, we argue that the process would be made easier by explicit recognition of the approach to be taken in the rules of evidence. This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in the Criminal Law Review following peer review. The definitive published version will be available online on Westlaw UK.
  • Can we have faith jurors listen without prejudice? Likely sources of inaccuracy in voice comparison exercises.
    Can we have faith jurors listen without prejudice? Likely sources of inaccuracy in voice comparison exercises. Robson, Jeremy; Smith, H. This paper reviews the current law in respect of whether juries may permitted to listen to recordings of a suspect's voice with a view to undertaking an identification. It discusses the factors which impact upon the accuracy of the process and suggests procedural amendments to reduce the risk of misidentification taking place. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.

Robson, J., Newman, L., and O’Hagan, A. (2021) Redrawing the boundaries: The adequacy of the Sexual Offences Act in addressing female sexual offending. Journal of Criminal Law. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022018320984451

 Robson, J. and Bettinson, V. (2020) Prosecuting Coercive Control: Reforming Storytelling in the Courtroom. Criminal Law Review, 12, pp. 1107-1126

Smith, H.M.J., Bird, K., Roeser, J., Robson, J., Braber, N., Wright, D. and Stacey, P.C. (2020) Voice parade procedures: optimising witness performance, Memory, https://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2019.1673427

Robson, J. and Smith, H. (2019) Can we have faith jurors listen without prejudice? Likely sources of inaccuracy in voice comparison exercises. Criminal Law Review, , 2, pp.115-130

Smith, H., Baguley, T., Dunn, A., Stacey, P., and Robson, J. (2018) Forensic voice discrimination: The effect of speech type and background noise on performance. Applied Cognitive Psychology,

Robson J. (2018) Lend Me Your Ears: An Analysis Of How Voice Identification Evidence Is Treated In Four Neighbouring Criminal Justice Systems. International Journal of Evidence and Proof, 22 (3), pp. 218-238

Robson, J. (2017) A fair hearing? The use of voice identification parades in criminal investigations in England and Wales. Criminal Law Review,1, pp. 36 – 50

Robson, J. (2016) The veiled lodger - a reflection on the status of R v D. Nottingham Law Journal, 25, pp.105-111.

Robson, J. (2016) The Niqaab and the Myth of Pinocchio’s Nose: Is the Niqaab an Impediment to Fact Finding in an Adversarial Trial? An Analysis of R v D. Oxford Journal of Law and Religion, 5(2), pp.319-343.

 Edwards, H. and Robson, J. , (2012). Caging the green-eyed monster – restrictions on the use of sexual infidelity as a defence to murder. Nottingham Law Journal, 21, pp. 143-145. ISSN 0965-0660

 Popular/trade press

 

Robson, J. (2018) Women should be allowed to wear the niqab in court – here’s why. The Conversation [Online]

Robson, J. , (2017). EU wildlife laws should be celebrated – and retained – not treated as red tape. The Conversation. (also published in the I newspaper).

Robson, J., (2017). Is the era of advocacy dead? Lawyer 2B.

Robson, J., (2016). Split the BPTC, watch out for the diversity risks. Lawyer 2B.

Robson, J., (2016). The vital rules which meant a double murderer nearly escaped justice. The Conversation.

Robson, J., (2016). Gove’s nonsense: barristers vs solicitor advocates. Solicitors Journal. ISSN 0038-1152

Robson, J., (2016). All for one or one for all? Solicitors Journal, 160 (10), p. 15. ISSN 0038-1152

Robson, J., (2015). Crown Court: structured mayhem better than complete mayhem. The Times. ISSN 0140-0460

Robson, J., (2015). How Michael Gove is changing the tune on justice reform. The Conversation.

Robson, J., (2015). CPS faces a stark choice. .

Robson, J., (2014). Lawyers need training to protect vulnerable witnesses in sex offence cases. The Conversation

Edwards, H. and Robson, J., 2014. Advocacy series, part 5: Cross examination. .

Robson, J. and Edwards, H., 2014. Advocacy series, part 6: Closing speeches. , pp. 18-19.

Robson, J., 2014. The BPTC checklist. , p. 20.

Robson, J., 2014. Why advocacy standards must be maintained. , pp. 1-3. ISSN 0038-1152

Robson J. and Edwards, H., 2013. Advocacy series part 1: What is advocacy? .

Robson, J. and Edwards, H., 2013. Advocacy series, part 2: Case preparation. .

Robson, J. and Edwards, H., 2013. Advocacy series, part 4: Submissions. .

Robson, J., 2013. Blurring the lines. , p. 17. ISSN 0038-1152

Robson, J. and Edwards, H., 2012. Common cause. , pp. 13-14.

Research interests/expertise

Interdisciplinary approaches to Criminal Litigation and Evidence

Criminal Law

The Practice and Teaching of Advocacy

Areas of teaching

LPC - Full time, part time and blended - Litigation and advocacy

LLB Evidence

Qualifications

1998, LLB (Hons) 2.1, University of East Anglia

1999, Bar Vocational Course (Very Competent), Inns of Court School of Law

2011, Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education, Nottingham Trent University   

2015, LLM in Legal Practice (Distinction), Nottingham Trent University

Courses taught

Legal Practice Course

LLB

LLM

Honours and awards

Legal Cheek – social media user of the year 2016. Nominated for Emojicaselaw

Membership of external committees

Solicitors Regulatory Authority – Higher Rights of Audience advisory group

External examiner – Bar Standards Board 2011 – 2020

Membership of professional associations and societies

Case notes editor – International Journal of Evidence and Proof

Associate Tenant (KCH Garden Square)

Fellow of the Higher Education Authority

Advocacy Training Council accredited advocacy tutor

Member of the Middle Temple.

 

Conference attendance

Conference organisation

Organiser Nottingham Trent University – Advancing Advocacy Conference 23 June 2017

Lead Organiser (with Helen Edwards)  –  International Advocacy Teaching Conference 26 and 27 June 2016

Lead Organiser (with Helen Edwards) – International Advocacy Teaching Conference 27 and 28 June 2014

Conference contributions

Smith, H.M.J., Kelly, S., Braber, N., Robson, J. and Wright, D. (2018) Developing a procedure for eliciting accurate, detailed, and consistent forensic voice descriptions from lay witnesses. British Psychological Society Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference 2018, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, 29-31 August 2018.

Smith, H., Braber, N., Robson, J., Wright, D. and Kelly, S. (2018) Not deep just average: Improving the usability of lay-listener voice descriptions. Germanic Society for Forensic Linguistics (GSFL2018), University of York, York, 2-5 August 2018.

Robson, J., Braber, N., Smith, H.M.J., Wright, D., Hardy, A. (2018) Accent detection in earwitness identification. Germanic Society for Forensic Linguistics (GSFL2018), University of York, York, 2-5 August 2018.

ROBSON, J., 2017. A fair "hearing": voice identification, parades and PACE. In: Advancing Advocacy Conference: Challenges Ahead in Criminal Evidence and Procedure, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, 23 June 2017.

ROBSON, J., 2015. The veil and the myth of Pinocchio's nose. In: Human Rights, Law and Religion: Perspectives on the Islamic Face Veil [seminar], Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice, in collaboration with the NLS Centre for Advocacy, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, 30 March 2015, Nottingham.

ROBSON, J., 2014. Criminal advocacy training after Jeffrey. In: International Advocacy Teaching Conference 2014, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, 27-28 June 2014, Nottingham.

EDWARDS, H. and ROBSON, J., 2014. How to commit the perfect crime - designing teaching materials which develop storytelling abilities in trainee advocates. In: Applied Legal Storytelling Conference, City University London, London, 22-24 July 2014, London.

EDWARDS, H. and ROBSON, J., 2013. Do pride and prejudice stand in the way of persuasion? Embracing other disciplines for the advancement of advocacy teaching. In: Association of Law Teachers: 48th Annual Conference: All Consuming Legal Education, Nottingham Conference Centre, Nottingham, 24-26 March 2013, Nottingham.

Externally funded research grants information

01/11/2019 ‘Improving Voice Identification Procedures’ Co-investigator (with the University of Cambridge, University of Oxford and Nottingham Trent University) on a three year Economic and Social Research Council grant (£866,097) to develop an improved procedure for constructing voice identification parades and investigating the normative assumptions in the criminal justice system.

Developing a procedure for eliciting accurate, detailed, and consistent forensic voice descriptions from lay witnesses – British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grants Fund Co-Investigator with Dr H Smith and Dr N Braber.

Links to practice

Fee paid Tribunal Judge – Social Entitlement Chamber

Associate Tenant – KCH Garden Square Barristers