Dr Kelley Wilder

Job: Director, Photographic History Research Centre

Faculty: Arts, Design and Humanities

School/department: School of Humanities

Research group(s): Photographic History Research Centre (PHRC)

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: N/A

E: kwilder@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/phrc

Social Media: photographichistory.wordpress.com

 

Personal profile

Dr Kelley Wilder is a photographic historian, with interests in the cultures of science and knowledge generated by photography and photographic practice.  In her work Kelley  considers the photographic practices of Nineteenth century scientists and artists like William Henry Fox Talbot, Sir John Herschel, Henri Becquerel and others. New projects include work on Photographic catalogues and archives, and Nineteenth and Twentieth century material cultures of photographic industry and image making.

Research group affiliations

Publications and outputs 

  • Stereo Atlases as Hybrid Knowledge
    Stereo Atlases as Hybrid Knowledge Wilder, Kelley This paper examines the nature of knowledge generated by the use of stereo images in scientific atlases. Taking both photography and drawing to be stereo imaging methods in the sciences, it contends that it is not only photography we should pay attention to. Market factors in the production of stereo atlases, the complicit introspection required of stereo atlas users, and the control exerted by the authors of stereo images combined to create a unique sort of hybrid knowledge.
  • Science, Art and the Business of Color
    Science, Art and the Business of Color Wilder, Kelley
  • Flash! A Literary and Visual Culture of Performative Technology
    Flash! A Literary and Visual Culture of Performative Technology Wilder, Kelley In Flash! Photography, Writing, & Surprising Illumination Kate Flint presents a technology history in the fullness of its literary and visual culture as it plays out over more than a century. Her narrative is not about inventions, firsts or the sort of exceptionalism of individual geniuses that often populate the stories of photography or photographically related technology. It is instead about presenting the technological, literary and visual cultures of the flash as mutually productive, inseparable entities. Roundtable article The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • The Two Cultures of Word and Image: On Materiality and the Photographic Catalog
    The Two Cultures of Word and Image: On Materiality and the Photographic Catalog Wilder, Kelley
  • Through the Looking-Glass: Hans Danuser’s 'Last Analogue Photograph'
    Through the Looking-Glass: Hans Danuser’s 'Last Analogue Photograph' Wilder, Kelley
  • Not one but Many: Photographic Trajectories and the Making of History
    Not one but Many: Photographic Trajectories and the Making of History Wilder, Kelley This essay examines the networks that form an archive using variations on a single photograph from the Thomas Rodger studio of St Andrews. Using the concept of a ‘thick thing’, the essay charts the trajectories of photographs of bronze age funerary urns as they left Rodger’s studio, were collected in albums and used in lectures, and returned to the University of St Andrews Special Collections. Taking just one of Rodger’s photographic assignments as a prism allows us to think about the circulation of many of his photographs both during his lifetime and after, as both the creation of ‘thick things’ and as ‘material performances’ that have since gained the title ‘Early Scottish Photography’ in the St Andrews Special Collections. From a humble object photograph and its variations, the essay argues for the agency of the photographs and their studio origins in forming the special collections photographic collection, and making, in a very literal sense, the stuff from which we write history
  • Photography in the Marketplace
    Photography in the Marketplace Wilder, Kelley Photography in the Marketplace is not only a matter of industrial advertising photography, or corporate branding, but is a political, material and above all, commercial enterprise that inflects the taking, circulating, collection and recirculation of photographs. The materiality of the markets in which photography takes part, the communications networks in which they circulate, and the circumstances in which they are preserved as history enrich the narratives of ‘industry’ beyond its current confines.
  • Documenting the World: FIlm, Photography and the Scientific Record
    Documenting the World: FIlm, Photography and the Scientific Record Wilder, Kelley; Mitman, Gregg Imagine the twentieth century without photography and film. Its history would be absent of images that defined historical moments and generations: the Battle of the Somme, the death camps of Auschwitz, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Apollo lunar landing. The introduction of photography, and subsequently, film in documenting the present created new types of records that altered notions of historical, legal, and scientific evidence, changed interactions among scientists and their subjects, and challenged the very construction and meaning of the archive. Together, the still and moving image helped to instill a documentary impulse that combined the power of science and industry with a particularly utopian (and often imperialistic) belief in the capacity of photography and film to visually capture the world, order it and render it useful for future generations. In the virtual world of images, it is easy to lose sight of the material dimensions of the film and photographic record left behind in this quixotic quest. But the sheer mass of photograph and film documents that take up space in archives and consume vast resources in their virtual state on the web is a reminder of their material impact. At 100 million images and counting, Corbis, for example, one of the largest sites for one-stop shopping for digital still and moving images, is dependent upon a gigantic physical infrastructure of fiber optic cables, routers, hubs, and servers that greatly expand the material footprint of the archival image. This book is about the material and social life of photographs and films made in the scientific quest to document the world. Each step of documentation—from the initial recording of images, to their acquisition and storage, to their circulation—has physically transformed natural and built environments, altered the lives of human subjects, reconstituted disciplines of knowledge, and changed economic and social relationships. Drawing upon scholars from across the fields of art history, visual anthropology, and science and technology studies, the essays in this volume explore the work that photographs and films do as evidentiary documents, narrative objects, and the stuff of archives spanning more than a century of photographic and film history. The link below is for the introduction of this book.
  • Fields of Vision: Photographing the Glass Record
    Fields of Vision: Photographing the Glass Record Wilder, Kelley
  • Josh Ellenbogen, Reasoned and Unreasoned Images: The Photography of Bertillon, Galton, and Marey
    Josh Ellenbogen, Reasoned and Unreasoned Images: The Photography of Bertillon, Galton, and Marey Wilder, Kelley Book Review

Click here for a full listing of Kelley Wilder's publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

Dr Kelley Wilder is a photographic historian, with interests in the cultures of science and knowledge generated by photography and photographic practice.  In her work Kelley  considers the photographic practices of Nineteenth century scientists and artists like William Henry Fox Talbot, Sir John Herschel, Henri Becquerel and others. New projects include work on Photographic catalogues and archives, and Nineteenth and Twentieth century material cultures of photographic industry and image making.

Areas of teaching

  • Photographic history
  • Photography and industry
  • Photographic research practices
  • Photographic historiography
  • Material histories of photography
  • Science and Photography
  • History of Technology

Qualifications

D.Phil., Oxford University 2003

Courses taught

MA - History of Photography, Images and Practice

MA - Photography and Industry

BA - co teaching Newton to Nuclear: An Introduction to the History of Science, Medicine and Technology

Membership of external committees

Advisory Board, Studies in Theory and History of Photography, University of Zurich

 

Membership of professional associations and societies

 European Society of the History of Photography 

 History of Science Society

 European Society for the History of Science

 

Conference attendance


Photo Archives V: The Paradigm of Objectivity (Getty Research Institute/Huntington Library/ KHI)

Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q7kyPITxxo

Recent research outputs


Kelley Wilder, 'Flash! A Literary and Visual Culture of Performative Technology' Journal of Victorian Culture, Volume 23, Issue 4, 28 September (2018) 503–507.

Wilder, K. ‘Not one but Many: Photographic Trajectories and the Making of History’ in History of Photography 41:4 (2017) 376-394.

Wilder, K. 'Through the Looking-Glass: Hans Danuser’s Last Analogue Photograph' in Hans Danuser, Darkrooms of Photography (Gottingen: Steidl Verlag, 2017)

Wilder, K. 'Fields of Vision: Photographing the Glass Record' in Wayne Barrar, The Glass Archive (Massey University: Wellington, NZ, 2016) 4-11.

Wilder, K. 'A Note on the Science of Photography: Reconsidering the Invention Story' in Tanya Sheehan and Andrew Zervigon eds. Photography and Its Origins (New York: Routledge, 2015) 208-221.

Current research students

  • Ella Ravilious 'Photographic Collecting Practices of the National Art Library' CDA with Victoria and Albert Museum
  • Erika Lederman  'Women Photographers and the South Kensington Museum' CDA with Victoria and Albert Museum
  • Marta Binazzi 'All Rights Reserved. Copyright and Patent Laws’ Impact on the Commercialisation of Permanent Photographs of Artworks in Europe: 1865-1900'
  • Valentine Nyamdon 'Manufacturing a Subversive Reality: Backdrops and Photographic Manipulations in Cameroonian studio Photography'

Externally funded research grants information

Pictures in Natural Collections: with Damian Hughes, Post Doctoral Grant (M3C)

Doing Science in a Photographic Age 2017-2018 (British Academy)

 

 

Internally funded research project information

 

The Meaning of Photographic Materials (HEIF) 2017

The Nature of Kodak Research, PhD funded to run 2012 – 2015.

Practising Photography in the Sciences, PhD funded to run 2012 – 2015.

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