Dr Brahim Herbane

Job: Principal Lecturer

Faculty: Business and Law

School/department: Leicester Castle Business School

Address: The Gateway, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 2551551

E: bhcor@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/bal

 

Personal profile

Brahim is a Principal Lecturer in Strategic Management and Business Continuity Management in the Department of Strategic Management and Marketing. A graduate of the University of Leeds, Dr Herbane’s subsequent doctoral research focused upon strategic management concepts in the UK automotive components industry.  He has written  a number of books, monographs and peer reviewed articles included the second edition of the best-selling Business Continuity Management – A Crisis Management Approach (Routledge New York) and  has worked with a variety of British and international organisations in areas such as business continuity management, supply chain management, and information technology adoption.  Dr Herbane has been an external examiner for the Universities of Bradford, Liverpool and Sheffield.  Prior to joining De Montfort University, Brahim worked at the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spanish National Research Council) in Madrid, Bradford and Bingley Society’s Corporate Planning Department, and has taught at the Universities of Birmingham and Sheffield.

Publications and outputs 

  • Rethinking Organizational Resilience and Strategic Renewal in SMEs
    Rethinking Organizational Resilience and Strategic Renewal in SMEs Herbane, B. Building on work that associates organizational resilience with crisis recovery and strategic renewal, I examine how small and medium- sized enterprises (SMEs) vary in the formalisation of activities intended to achieve strategic growth and activities to enhance resilience against acute operational interruptions. Drawing on data from 265 SMEs in the United Kingdom, the main argument of this paper is that variations in formalisation activities reflect differences in firm location, personal networks, the influence of external crisis events, and entrepreneurs’ attitudes towards the prevention of crises. The resulting typology identifies four clusters: Attentive Interventionists, Light Planners, Rooted Strategists and Reliant Neighbours. These findings contrast with prior theorizations of firms as either resilient or vulnerable and further illuminate our understanding of SME resilience and how this is shaped by historical, developmental and strategic factors. The study further develops associations between resilience and social capital, examines how locational choices generate a proximity premium, and develops a growth-survival-maturity perspective on SME resilience. Data reveals an interplay between an ensemble of entrepreneurial activities and decisions about planning, networks, learning, and location. Thus, the study offers a rethinking of prior theorizations about organizational resilience and strategic renewal The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.
  • The Structuring Activities of Boundary Objects
    The Structuring Activities of Boundary Objects Thompson, Ed; Herbane, B.; Macpherson, Allan Boundary objects (Star and Griesemer, 1989) are non-human actors or artefacts that can coordinate collaborative activity across social worlds. Unlike human actors, who have intentionality, this coordinating role occurs as the object is embedded in the network of actors and they influence or shape interactions and meanings between human actors. While existing research has investigated, and demonstrated, the success of objects facilitating collaboration within (epistemic objects, Knorr Cetina, 1999) and across (boundary objects, Star and Griesemer, 1989) groups, it has hitherto been unable to explain how such objects come into being (Nicolini et al, 2012); the focus has been on the role of objects in assembling networks of actors, rather than the roles of networks of actors in assembling specific objects (Knights and McCabe, 2016). Moreover, primarily research on such boundary objects has been in stable environments, where day-today activity is predictable and ordered. This article makes use of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) as a means of understanding boundary object formation, ontology and transience. Specifically, this paper addresses how boundary objects come into being, how they hold together the actor network, and how they are affected by changes in context.
  • Threat orientation in small and medium-sized enterprises: Understanding differences toward acute interruptions
    Threat orientation in small and medium-sized enterprises: Understanding differences toward acute interruptions Herbane, B. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the experience, impact and likelihood of an acute business interruption, along with the perceived ability to intervene, influences the “threat orientation” of owner-managers in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the UK. The concept of “threat orientation” is introduced in this study as a way to eschew the binary view of whether an organisation does or does not have processes and capabilities to respond to acute interruptions. Design/methodology/approach – “Threat orientation” is operationalised and survey data are collected from 215 SMEs in the UK. Data from owner-managers are analysed using multiple regression techniques. Findings – The results of this study provide empirical evidence to highlight the importance of firm age rather than size as a determinant of the propensity to formalise activities to deal with acute interruptions. Recent experience and the ability to intervene were statistically significant predictors of threat orientation but the likelihood and concern about specific types of threat was not found to positively influence threat orientation. Research limitations/implications – Although the data are self-report in nature, the respondents in the study are the chief decision and policy makers in their organisations and thus it is essential to understand the influences on their threat orientation. Results are generalisable only to UK SMEs. Originality/value – The findings of the paper contribute to a nascent understanding of planning for acute interruptions in SMEs and (despite the cross-sectional nature of the study), the findings clearly reinforce the need for continuing longitudinal research into how resilience develops in smaller organisations.
  • Developing dynamic capabilities through resource accretion: expanding the entrepreneurial solution space
    Developing dynamic capabilities through resource accretion: expanding the entrepreneurial solution space Herbane, B.; Jones, Oswald; Macpherson, Allan
  • Information value distance and crisis management planning
    Information value distance and crisis management planning Herbane, B.
  • Exploring Crisis Management in UK Small and Medium-sized Enterprises
    Exploring Crisis Management in UK Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Herbane, B. Despite a long-established crisis management literature that focuses on large enterprises, crisis management planning in the context of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is less extensively researched. Using data collected from 215 SMEs in the United Kingdom, this paper explores the perceptions and experiences of SMEs' managing directors in relation to crisis management planning. Furthermore, the paper examines differences in perceptions between planning and non-planning SMEs. Analysis reveals six factors that correspond to resilience through planning, financial impact, operational crisis management, the perfect storm, the aftermath of survival and atrophy. Results indicate how the experience of crisis and the type of crisis of type encountered affect managers' assessment of whether planning can be used to address crisis prevention and lower impact.
  • Learning to cope with resource constraints and uncertainty: entrepreneurs practising purposefully.
    Learning to cope with resource constraints and uncertainty: entrepreneurs practising purposefully. Herbane, B.; Macpherson, Allan; Jones, Oswald In this paper, we argue that by dealing with resource constraints when facing situations of uncertainty, entrepreneurs engage in a number of activities to manage the ambiguity they face. In other words, we explore how entrepreneurs respond when learning in crisis mode and how they manage to recover or deal with constrained contexts they face. We report our findings from the analysis of significant learning episodes in 23 SMEs. Our contribution is to identify purposeful practices through which the entrepreneurs enlarge their potential solution space. They do this by gradual accretion of capability, thereby expanding the repertoire of potential action. By accretion in this context, we refer to the grafting and borrowing of capabilities into the firm’s action frame dependent on proximities, salience and relationships.
  • Communications about resilience enhancing activities by English local authorities.
    Communications about resilience enhancing activities by English local authorities. Herbane, B.
  • Small business research - Time for a crisis-based view.
    Small business research - Time for a crisis-based view. Herbane, B.
  • The evolution of business continuity management: A historical review of practices and drivers.
    The evolution of business continuity management: A historical review of practices and drivers. Herbane, B.


Click here to see a full listing of Dr Brahim Herbane's publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Crisis Management
  • Business Continuity Management
  • Organisational Learning from Crisis
  • Strategic Management

Areas of teaching

  • Strategic Management
  • Crisis Management
  • Business Continuity Management
  • PhD supervision

Qualifications

  • BA (First Class Honours)
  • PhD
brahim-herbane

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