Professor Raghu Raghavan

Job: Professor of Mental Health

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: School of Nursing and Midwifery

Research group(s): Nursing and Midwifery Research centre

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 201 3831

E: rraghavan@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/nursingandmidwifery

 

Personal profile

Raghu’s clinical background is in health psychology and nursing, with expertise in participatory research and co-production. His research is encapsulated by four overarching, but inter-related themes which address issues in mental health, disability and wellbeing: improving access to services/interventions, user involvement, practice and service development, cultural diversity and inclusion.

His current research consists of exploring the conceptualisation of dementia in minority ethnic communities; faith, belief systems and mental health recovery; mental health literacy and research participation from diverse ethnic communities.

He has published widely on disability, ethnicity and service improvement. He is currently editing a book on Mental Health, Ethnicity and Cultural Diversity: Exploring narratives for transformative services. He is director of Mary Seacole Research Centre and is also co-ordinating the International Transcultural Mental Health Network

Research group affiliations

  • Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre
  • Centre for Social Action
  • Mary Seacole Research Centre
  • Youth Community and Education
  • Health Policy Research

Publications and outputs 

  • Healthcare for Older People Research in Leicestershire
    Healthcare for Older People Research in Leicestershire Conroy, Simon; Brown, Jayne; Bell, Katie; Haunton, Victoria; Robinson, TG; Bannerjee, J; Martin, G; Regen, E; Phelps, K; O'Kelly, K; Kondova, D; Williamson, I.; Wildbur, D.; Fallman, S; Chen, L; Oldridge, Louise; Larkin, M; Wilson, A; Agarwal, S.; Bankart, J.; Subramaniam, H; Raghavan, Raghu; Panerai, R; Clague-Baker, Nicola; Chung, E; Stahl, B; Chen, F; Triboan, D; Psychoula, I; Northcott, Andy Academic geriatric medicine in Leicester . There has never been a better time to consider joining us. We have recently appointed a Professor in Geriatric Medicine, alongside Tom Robinson in stroke and Victoria Haunton, who has just joined as a Senior Lecturer in Geriatric Medicine. We have fantastic opportunities to support students in their academic pursuits through a well-established intercalated BSc programme, and routes on through such as ACF posts, and a successful track-record in delivering higher degrees leading to ACL post. We collaborate strongly with Health Sciences, including academic primary care. See below for more detail on our existing academic set-up. Leicester Academy for the Study of Ageing We are also collaborating on a grander scale, through a joint academic venture focusing on ageing, the ‘Leicester Academy for the Study of Ageing’ (LASA), which involves the local health service providers (acute and community), De Montfort University; University of Leicester; Leicester City Council; Leicestershire County Council and Leicester Age UK. Professors Jayne Brown and Simon Conroy jointly Chair LASA and have recently been joined by two further Chairs, Professors Kay de Vries and Bertha Ochieng. Karen Harrison Dening has also recently been appointed an Honorary Chair. LASA aims to improve outcomes for older people and those that care for them that takes a person-centred, whole system perspective. Our research will take a global perspective, but will seek to maximise benefits for the people of Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland, including building capacity. We are undertaking applied, translational, interdisciplinary research, focused on older people, which will deliver research outcomes that address domains from: physical/medical; functional ability, cognitive/psychological; social or environmental factors. LASA also seeks to support commissioners and providers alike for advice on how to improve care for older people, whether by research, education or service delivery. Examples of recent research projects include: ‘Local History Café’ project specifically undertaking an evaluation on loneliness and social isolation; ‘Better Visits’ project focused on improving visiting for family members of people with dementia resident in care homes; and a study on health issues for older LGBT people in Leicester. Clinical Geriatric Medicine in Leicester We have developed a service which recognises the complexity of managing frail older people at the interface (acute care, emergency care and links with community services). There are presently 17 consultant geriatricians supported by existing multidisciplinary teams, including the largest complement of Advance Nurse Practitioners in the country. Together we deliver Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment to frail older people with urgent care needs in acute and community settings. The acute and emergency frailty units – Leicester Royal Infirmary This development aims at delivering Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment to frail older people in the acute setting. Patients are screened for frailty in the Emergency Department and then undergo a multidisciplinary assessment including a consultant geriatrician, before being triaged to the most appropriate setting. This might include admission to in-patient care in the acute or community setting, intermediate care (residential or home based), or occasionally other specialist care (e.g. cardiorespiratory). Our new emergency department is the county’s first frail friendly build and includes fantastic facilities aimed at promoting early recovering and reducing the risk of hospital associated harms. There is also a daily liaison service jointly run with the psychogeriatricians (FOPAL); we have been examining geriatric outreach to oncology and surgery as part of an NIHR funded study. We are home to the Acute Frailty Network, and those interested in service developments at the national scale would be welcome to get involved. Orthogeriatrics There are now dedicated hip fracture wards and joint care with anaesthetists, orthopaedic surgeons and geriatricians. There are also consultants in metabolic bone disease that run clinics. Community work Community work will consist of reviewing patients in clinic who have been triaged to return to the community setting following an acute assessment described above. Additionally, primary care colleagues refer to outpatients for sub-acute reviews. You will work closely with local GPs with support from consultants to deliver post-acute, subacute, intermediate and rehabilitation care services. Stroke Medicine 24/7 thrombolysis and TIA services. The latter is considered one of the best in the UK and along with the high standard of vascular surgery locally means one of the best performances regarding carotid intervention.
  • Systematic review of applied theatre practice in the Indian context of mental health, resilience and well-being
    Systematic review of applied theatre practice in the Indian context of mental health, resilience and well-being Crossley, Mark; Barrett, A.; Brown, Brian J.; Coope, J.; Raghavan, Raghu This systematic review seeks to evaluate the documented uses of applied theatre practice within an Indian context. At its most particular level, the review focuses on theatre interventions within migrant slum (basti) communities and, where in evidence, the conjunction of applied theatre with research and practice from mental health and well-being, in exploring these latter issues within such communities and the level and modes of their resilience. The review also draws upon related global research to contextualise and inform the Indian context. At present, systematic reviews are not prevalent within the research fields of theatre or specifically applied theatre , yet such reviews arguably offer the breadth of objective evidence required to interrogate the efficacy of such practice. This review is therefore intended to rigorously map the existing academic research and the more diffuse online dialogues within India that are pertinent to the subject; to consider the relations, contradictions, absences and inconsistencies within this literature, and from this to articulate key findings that may be integrated into the planning and delivery of new initiatives within this field. In this regard it seeks to survey the current state of knowledge, identify problems, evaluate current theory as well as develop new theoretical paradigms.
  • Resilience in children and young people with intellectual disabilities: a review of literature
    Resilience in children and young people with intellectual disabilities: a review of literature Raghavan, Raghu; Griffin, Edward Purpose: Building the resilience of children with intellectual disabilities (ChID) can help reduce the personal, social and economic costs associated with mental ill health among such children. The aim of this paper is to review the research evidence on resilience in children with intellectual disabilities and to suggest areas for further research. Methodology: Journal articles published in the last 20 years were searched for in several on-line databases to find potential papers for this review. The inclusion criteria were to search for published journal articles covering the theme of resilience in children with intellectual disabilities and their families. All identified titles and abstracts were screened which resulted in 50 articles. These were scrutinised more thoroughly and 34 remaining articles were selected for review. Findings: Resilience is a dynamic process involving interactions between various risk and protective processes both internal and external to the individual that act to mediate the influences of adverse life events. Five key themes were identified within the literature which helped to form a picture of the current understanding of resilience among ChID and their careers. These were (1) increased risk factors associated with ID, (2) the role of personal attributes on resilience, (3) family and resilience, (4) schooling and resilience and (5) cultural factors which enhance resilience. Originality: Despite the consistency with which poor outcomes for ChID have been reported there is little investigation of the specific causes, contributory factors and processes that might improve them. This paper contributes to greater understanding of resilience factors for children and young people with ID and provides areas for further research The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Calm Child Programme: Parental programme for anxiety in children and young people with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities
    Calm Child Programme: Parental programme for anxiety in children and young people with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities Gobrial, E.; Raghavan, Raghu Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disabilities (IDs) are more vulnerable to experiencing anxiety disorders. Parental involvement in intervention is crucial for successful management of the interventions in the population of people with ASDs. This article describes the design and evaluation of parenting programme for anxiety disorders in children and young people with ASD and ID. In phase 1 semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore management strategies for anxiety at home and in school settings. A total of 34 participants (14 parents, 20 teachers) participated in the interviews. A Delphi process was conducted with health professionals to develop consensus on appropriate anxiety interventions. In phase 2 the intervention programme was implemented by seven parents who also participated in focus group to evaluate the developed programme. A parental programme, calm child programme (CCP), was developed, implemented and evaluated. The evaluations show significant decrease in children’s anxiety as a result of implementing the programme. This study contributes further evidence to parental involvement in interventions for children and young people with ASD and IDs. The CCP is a useful and cost-effective approach in enabling parents to provide anxiety interventions in a home setting The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Improving the recruitment of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities in health and social care research: a review of literature
    Improving the recruitment of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities in health and social care research: a review of literature Raghavan, Raghu; Jutlla, Karan It is suggested that Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities experience severe health inequalities and poor health outcomes compared to indigenous white groups. However there is a dearth of health-related research undertaken with BAME populations in the UK. Many terms are used to describe this group of people such as ‘ethnic minorities’, ‘racial minorities’ ‘black and minority ethnic’ groups. The aim of this literature review is to identify the barriers and enablers for recruiting people from BAME communities in research. Searches were an iterative process, designed to keep up to date with published material from the year 2000 onwards to 2015. In total, 54 articles were retrieved from which 39 papers were included in this review. A thematic analysis was applied to identify the key issues for consideration when conducting health related research with BAME communities. A number of key themes were identified as potential barriers for conducting research with BAME communities and approaches for improving research participation of Black Asian and Minority Ethnic communities are discussed
  • Improving the recruitment of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities in health and social care research: a review of literature.
    Improving the recruitment of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities in health and social care research: a review of literature. Jutlla, Karan; Raghavan, Raghu It is suggested that Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities experience severe health inequalities and poor health outcomes compared to indigenous white groups. However there is a dearth of health-related research undertaken with BAME populations in the UK. Many terms are used to describe this group of people such as ‘ethnic minorities’, ‘racial minorities’ ‘black and minority ethnic’ groups. The aim of this literature review is to identify the barriers and enablers for recruiting people from BAME communities in research. Searches were an iterative process, designed to keep up to date with published material from the year 2000 onwards to 2015. In total, 54 articles were retrieved from which 39 papers were included in this review. A thematic analysis was applied to identify the key issues for consideration when conducting health related research with BAME communities. A number of key themes were identified as potential barriers for conducting research with BAME communities and approaches for improving research participation of Black Asian and Minority Ethnic communities are discussed
  • Exploring Barriers to South Asian Help-Seeking for Eating Disorders
    Exploring Barriers to South Asian Help-Seeking for Eating Disorders Wales, Jackie; Brewin, Nicola; Raghavan, Raghu; Arcelus, Jon Purpose Referrals to specialist eating disorder services from the South Asian (SA) community are under-represented, despite research suggesting that disordered eating attitudes and behaviours of SA people are similar to the population in general. The study aimed to identify the reasons for this and sought to inform ways to encourage help-seeking. Design/Methodology/Approach A qualitative methodology was used to investigate barriers to help-seeking for eating disorders among the SA community. A key informant focus group was conducted with clinicians working within the local specialist eating disorder service (participants n=16, 12 female, 4 male). Six focus groups were conducted with members of the SA community in Leicester, UK, (participants n=28, 23 female, 5 male) recruited from a local university, two charities and Children, Young People & Family Centres. Findings A number of themes emerged as possible factors for delaying early access to help: lack of knowledge about eating disorders and their potential seriousness; ideals regarding body shape; family living circumstances, and the role of food in the community. Participants acknowledged stigma among their community associated with mental health issues, including eating disorders, and concerns about confidentiality when approaching services, particularly primary care. Originality/value General practitioners and specialist services need to be aware of the potential barriers to help-seeking for eating disorders as early specialist help is recommended for effective treatment. An educational campaign around eating disorders specifically designed with the SA community in mind may improve awareness, reduce stigma and promote early help-seeking. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Mental Health and Cultural Diversity International Conference: Exploring Transformative Practices and Service Models Leicester (UK) 22–24 June 2016 Conference Programme and Book of Abstracts
    Mental Health and Cultural Diversity International Conference: Exploring Transformative Practices and Service Models Leicester (UK) 22–24 June 2016 Conference Programme and Book of Abstracts Raghavan, Raghu
  • Mental Health Services for Black and Minority Ethnic Groups in Leicester Leicestershire and Rutland
    Mental Health Services for Black and Minority Ethnic Groups in Leicester Leicestershire and Rutland Raghavan, Raghu; Griffin, Edward It is well documented that people from Black and minority ethnic communities experience severe inequalities in our mental health services. Leicester is one of England’s most culturally diverse cities with approximately 50% of its population from Black and Minority Ethnic groups, particularly those of South Asian origins. Our aim was to map the experiences of people from Black and Minority Ethnic Communities using the Mental Health Services in Leicester and Leicestershire. Focusing on five key documents on mental health and ethnicity and associated literature this documentary analysis addressed the following questions: 1. To what extent do we understand the MH needs of BME communities in Leicester and what do we need to know to improve this understanding? 2. To what extent do services meet the needs of BME individuals and how could this be improved? Recommendations
  • Mental health services for Black and Minority Ethnic groups in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland: A documentary analysis
    Mental health services for Black and Minority Ethnic groups in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland: A documentary analysis Raghavan, Raghu; Griffin, Edward It is well documented that people from Black and minority ethnic communities experience severe inequalities in our mental health services. Leicester is one of England’s most culturally diverse cities with approximately 50% of its population from Black and Minority Ethnic groups, particularly those of South Asian origins. Our aim was to map the experiences of people from Black and Minority Ethnic Communities using the Mental Health Services in Leicester and Leicestershire. Focusing on five key documents on mental health and ethnicity and associated literature this documentary analysis addressed the following questions: 1. To what extent do we understand the MH needs of BME communities in Leicester and what do we need to know to improve this understanding? 2. To what extent do services meet the needs of BME individuals and how could this be improved?

Click here for a full listing of Raghu Raghaven's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

  • Raghavan R and Griffin E (2017) Resilience and children and young people with intellectual disabilities, Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 11(3) 1-8

  •  

    Gobrial E and Raghavan R (2017) Calm Child Programme: Parental Programme for Anxiety in Children and Young People with Autism and Intellectual Disabilities, Journal of intellectual Disabilities, doi/10.1177/1744629517704536

  •  

    Wales J, Brewin N, Raghavan R and Arcelus J (2017) Exploring Barriers to South Asian Help-Seeking for Eating Disorders, Mental Health Review Journal, 22, 40-50

  •  

    Raghavan R (2016) Active Involvement and Co-production with people with intellectual disabilities from minority ethnic communities. In Social Work in a Diverse Society: Transformative Practice in Ethnic Minority Communities (Eds. C. Williams and M. Graham) Policy Press#

Research interests/expertise

  • Mental health and intellectual disability
  • Resilience and mental health
  • Ethnicity, cultural Diversity and service access
  • Transcultural mental health
  • User and carer perspectives
  • Assistive technology  

Areas of teaching

  • Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
  • Psychosocial interventions
  • Ageing and disability
  • User and family carer perspectives
  • Ethnicity and Cultural perspectives

Qualifications

  • PhD (Oxford Brookes University)
  • Post Graduate Certificate in Education (University of Wolverhampton)
  • M.Sc. in Medical Psychology (University of Surrey)
  • BA in Psychology (University of Kerala, India)

Membership of professional associations and societies

  • Nursing and Midwifery Council
  • International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability (IASSID)
  • British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD)
  • Association for Research Training and Integration in Europe (ARFIE)

Professional licences and certificates

  • Registered Nurse (Learning Disabilities), East Surrey school of Nursing, Redhill, Surrey

Conference attendance

  • Imagining cultural competence in mental health services, International conference on Cultural Diversity and Mental Health, Leicester, UK, 22-24 June, Conference abstracts, De Montfort University 
  • Co-production of mental health services for people from diverse ethnic communities: Emperor’s new clothes or transformative practice? Trans-Cultural Dialogues about Mental Health, Extreme states and Alternatives for recovery’ International Conference,  26 – 28 November 2016 – PUNE, INDIA
  • Beliefs, perceptions and attitudes of Schizophrenia among South Asian population: A review of evidence. Third International conference on Counselling, Psychotherapy and Wellness, 5-7, January, 2016, Christ University, Bengaluru, India.
  • Ageing and Intellectual Disability: A European perspective, European conference on Integrating different approaches in the neurodevelopmental perspective, Vienna, Austria, 2015 
  • Perspectives on ageing by people with intellectual disabilities and their family carers, New Horizons in Mental Health in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 12-14 September 2013, Estoril, Portugal
  • Resilience symposium: Review of resilience in young people with disabilities and mental health needs, 8th European Congress of Mental Health in Intellectual Disability, September 2011, Manchester
  • Use of Nintendo Wii to promote fitness, social skills and behaviour of children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder and intellectual disabilities, (with Kath Dickinson) 8th European Congress of Mental Health in Intellectual Disability, September 2011, Manchester
  • Calm child programme for children with autism and intellectual disabilities (with EGobrial), 8th European Congress of Mental Health in Intellectual Disability, September 2011, Manchester
  • Evaluation of a short course training programme on mental health for health care professionals, 8th European Congress of Mental Health in Intellectual Disability, September 2011, Manchester
  • Culture, ethnicity and services for children with disabilities, December 2010, Royal Society of Medicine, London

Consultancy work

Prof. Raghavan provides consultancy for a range of health and social care organisations. His portfolio of activities includes specialist staff training on behaviour and mental health interventions, practice and service development, user and family involvement, and ethnicity and cultural perspectives

Current research students

Rosemary Woods: A case study in developing a vocal communication system

Naina Patel: Conceptualisation of dementia in multi-ethnic communities

Ntokozo Ncube: Mental health recovery and spirituality

Lillian Ohene: Perceptions of family centred care for children in Ghana hospitalised through road traffic accidents

Chris Knifton: A socio-history and genealogy of dementia and its conceptualisation.

Gaynor Ward: Can people with learning disabilities report their own psychotic symptoms?

Ali Yildirim: The Experiences of recently qualified speech and language therapists in Inter-professional Collaborative Practice

Externally funded research grants information

  • Public Health Research (£200,000) Loneliness and social isolation in migrant communities (CI) ( PI Sarah Salway, University of Sheffield) 2017
  • Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) (£150,000Diagnosis of dementia in Black Asian and Minority Ethnic communities (CI) (PI Andrew Wilson University of Leicester) 2017
  • Hope against cancer (£61,500) Improving access and uptake of breast cancer screening and treatment services by Black Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) citizens in Leicester City  ( Ph.D. studentship) 2017
  • Leicester City Clinical Commissioning Group and East Midlands Academic Health Sciences Network (£16,000) Toolkit  improving research participation  of people from Black Asian and Minority Ethnic communities to  health research, 2016 
  • East Midlands CLAHRC ( Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care) (£55,000) Conceptualization of dementia in multi-ethnic communities (PI) (PhD studentship)
  • Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust (£10,000) Exploring South Asian young people perspectives on healthy eating, eating disorders and access to services (CI)
  • EU Lifelong Learning programme – Developing web-based training modules for professionals and front line staff caring for older people with disabilities. This is a two year study (Commenced in January 2012) in association with the University of Vienna and four service partners from Bologna, Belgium, France and Luxembourg.
  • Northumbria University research development fund - Mapping of emotional resilience activities by special schools for children and young people with disabilities (2011)
  • EU Grundtvig Lifelong learning programme – Elderly disabled integration gets new innovative tools in European Societies. In association with CADIAI, Bologna, Italy and other eight other European partners (2010 -2012)
  • From Services to Children and young people (Bradford District Council) – Access to inclusive play, sport and leisure provision for disabled children and young people as part of the Government initiative on Aiming High for Disabled Children. December 2009 to July 2011 (Raghavan) (£65000)
  • From Barnardos - To evaluate family carer training programme for supporting children with autism spectrum disorders, 2009 (£10,000)
  • From MENCAP -Leisure opportunities for young people with learning disabilities. This is two year action research project, 2007 to 2008 (Raghavan) (£55,000).
  • From Mencap – To investigate the issues and needs of older carers (60+) of people with a learning disability.(£10,000) September 2007  
  • From Joseph Rowntree Foundation – Application with International Centre for Participation Studies (Department of Peace studies, Bradford University) to investigate participation structures in the marginalised groups in the South Asian community in Bradford. This was a nine month project using participatory research methods (July 2005, £29.000).
  • From West Yorkshire Education and Training Consortium – production of a theatre  about transition of young people with disabilities from school to adult services with Mind the Gap theatre company (£15,000) (2005)
  • From Bradford District  Care Trust – To investigate lifespan perspectives – assessment and intervention – in the care of people with autism spectrum disorder (£10,000) in January 2003  (with Upadhyaya S, Dobson S, Bradford District Care Trust).
  • From Bradford District Care Trust - To explore the therapeutic aspects of touch in the care of people with profound and multiple disabilities (£5000) in January 2002 with (Dobson S and Upadhyaya, Bradford District Care Trust)
  • From the Foundation of People with Learning Disabilities (Mental Health Foundation) in July 02- The implementation of self-defined service models via a liaison worker in a multi-ethnic inner city population (£90,000). Two year study. (Raghavan R, Small N and Newell R) (2002 to 2004)
  • From the Department of Health – Learning Disability Research Programme to investigate social inclusion of children with learning disabilities from minority ethnic background in Bradford. Three-year research project (£140,000). (Raghavan R and Small N)  (2002 to 2005).

Professional esteem indicators

  • Editorial Board member for Journals: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, Learning Disability Practice
  • Reviewer for: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, Learning Disability Practice, Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
  • Patron – School of Drama therapy, Kerala, India
  • Reviewer for NIHR and ESRC research proposals
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