Ms Kim Sadique

Job: Associate Professor in Community & Criminal Justice

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: School of Applied Social Sciences

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 257 7832

E: ksadique@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/hls

 

Personal profile

Kim Sadique’s main teaching and research interests are:

Religion, Faith & Crime: the role of religion in creation of legal systems, crime prevention and support mechanisms for victims and the excusatory/blame function attributed to religion.

Genocide & State Crime: particularly the socio-cultural contexts in which hatred and discrimination occur and the role of 'tolerance' as museum object in educating people about genocide/state crime.

Kim is also interested in community cohesion and work with multi-faith communities.

Research group affiliations

Institute for Research in Criminology, Community, Education and Social Justice

Chair: Global Peace and Transitional Justice Research Group

Publications and outputs 

  • International Police Attitudes to Teaching Religion and Faith and the Policing of Minority Communities
    International Police Attitudes to Teaching Religion and Faith and the Policing of Minority Communities Stanislas, Perry; Sadique, K.
  • The Importance of Narrative in Responding to Hate Incidents Following ‘Trigger’ Events
    The Importance of Narrative in Responding to Hate Incidents Following ‘Trigger’ Events Sadique, K.; Tangen, James; Perowne, A. A national thematic report, prepared on the behalf of Tell MAMA, examining the patterns of online and offline anti-Muslim hate incidents following 'trigger' events.
  • Experiential Learning as Transformative: Teaching about Genocide and Crimes of the State
    Experiential Learning as Transformative: Teaching about Genocide and Crimes of the State Sadique, K.; Tangen, James The ‘applied nature’ of criminology, criminal justice and law courses lends itself to the use of experiential learning within programme delivery (George et al, 2015; Higgins et al, 2012). What is clear from the limited literature is that the use of experiential learning within criminal justice education has been focused on knowledge, skills, roles and identity of ‘the practitioner’. There is very little discussion of the value of experiential learning as transformative of the individual in terms of being able to critically reflect on the experience as a means to understand self and non-conformity to perceived hegemony (such as in the resistance to Nazis during the Second World War). Drawing on Bakhtin’s (1968) ‘Carnival’ and Mezirow’s (1991) Transformative Learning Theory this paper asks the question ‘Can experiential learning be truly transformative?’ It presents findings from narrative interviews with 20 undergraduate students studying Criminology, Psychology, Policing or Criminal Investigation who participated in a field trip to Auschwitz-Birkenau Camps. Interviews were undertaken pre and post field trip to examine students’ expectations of and reflections on the ‘experience’.
  • Religio-Cultural Alternatives to Treatment for Mental Health Problems
    Religio-Cultural Alternatives to Treatment for Mental Health Problems Sadique, K. Mental illness has long been associated with ‘external evil forces’ in numerous cultural and religious belief systems. Such frameworks suggest that both mental illness and personality disorders are due to a variety of causes including sinfulness, evil eye/jealousy, curses or the possession of the individual by demons/jinns (Hillier & Jewell, 1983; Rashid et al, 2012). Owing to their religio-cultural belief systems many choose to seek spiritual advice or ‘interventions’ from traditional faith/spiritual healers for psychiatric problems, either as a “first port of call” (Leavey, 2008 as cited in Rashid et al 2012:654) or as the sole treatment. Choice of treatment is both a reflection of people’s views of mental illness/ill health and of what is available to them (Sembhi & Dein, 1998). So this paper seeks to explore the motivations, expectations and perceived efficacy of ‘spiritual interventions’ from the perspective of those that seek such help.
  • Moving Beyond the Echo-Chamber? The Case for Improving Responses to Hate Crime
    Moving Beyond the Echo-Chamber? The Case for Improving Responses to Hate Crime Chakraborti, N.; Sadique, K. Hate crime has become an increasingly pernicious problem in many parts of the world, with numbers of incidents rising to record levels and causing devastating emotional and physical damage to victims, their families and wider communities. Within the UK last June’s EU referendum result was the catalyst for a surge in reports of targeted violence, while similar spikes have been seen within the US since the election of President Trump after a prolonged campaign of heated rhetoric and a slow disavowal of white supremacy. Equally alarming levels of hate crime have been documented across Europe with populist political parties in countries such as France, Denmark, Germany, Hungary and the Netherlands exploiting anti-immigrant sentiment, fuelling the scapegoating of particular minority groups and feeding off widely-held anxieties. Within this context the need for fresh responses to hate crime has become all the more pressing. Despite progress within the domains of scholarship and policy, these escalating levels of hate crime – and the associated rise in tensions, demonisation and hostility towards ‘difference’ that accompanies such spikes – casts doubt over the effectiveness of existing measures and their capacity to protect victims of hate crime. As such, this session draws from extensive fieldwork conducted by the panel members to examine the nature, impact and implications of hate crime. In addition to identifying the different forms that hate crime can take and their associated harms, the panel consider ways in which existing faultlines within criminal justice responses compound the sense of distress and alienation felt by victims from a diverse range of communities. They also explore ways in which criminological debate can reach beyond its own echo chamber to connect with ‘real-world’ hate crime responses and experiences, and call for urgent action to plug the ever-widening chasm between state-level narratives and victims’ lived realities.
  • Is Lex Talionis 'Caput' in a modern CJS: The Religio-Cultural Context of Punishment
    Is Lex Talionis 'Caput' in a modern CJS: The Religio-Cultural Context of Punishment Sadique, K.
  • The Effect of Religion on Crime and Deviancy: Hellfire in the 21st Century
    The Effect of Religion on Crime and Deviancy: Hellfire in the 21st Century Sadique, K.
  • Introduction: religion, faith and crime in context.
    Introduction: religion, faith and crime in context. Sadique, K.; Stanislas, Perry
  • Religion, faith and crime: theories, identities and issues.
    Religion, faith and crime: theories, identities and issues. Sadique, K.; Stanislas, Perry
  • Is Lex Talionis 'Caput' in a modern CJS?: the religio-cultural context of punishment.
    Is Lex Talionis 'Caput' in a modern CJS?: the religio-cultural context of punishment. Sadique, K.

Click here to view a full listing of Kim Sadique's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

Stanislas P., Sadique K. (2019) International Attitudes to Teaching Religion and Faith and the Policing of Minority Communities. In: Albrecht J., den Heyer G., Stanislas P. (eds) Policing and Minority Communities. Springer, Cham, pp 11-27

Sadique, K., Tangen, J. & Perowne, A. (2018) The Importance of Narrative in Responding to Hate Incidents Following ‘Trigger’ Events, [Online] Tell MAMA. Available from https://tellmamauk.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/Tell%20MAMA%20-%20Report.pdf

Sadique, K. (2016) The Effect of Religion on Crime and Deviancy: Hellfire in the 21st Century, in K. Sadique & P. Stanislas (eds) Religion, Faith & Crime: Theories, Identities and Issues. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Sadique, K. & Stanislas, P. (2016) Religion, Faith and Crime in Context, in K. Sadique & P. Stanislas (eds) Religion, Faith & Crime: Theories, Identities and Issues. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Research interests/expertise

  • Genocide and State Crime
  • Diversity & discrimination (inc. radicalisation/extremism, hate crime)
  • Religion, Spirituality and Crime

Areas of teaching

  • Genocide & State Crime
  • Religion, Faith & Crime
  • Hate Crime
  • Research/Dissertation supervision

Qualifications

  • Further & Adult Education Teaching Certificate (City & Guilds 7307) Barnfield College, Luton
  • MSc Criminal Justice Studies, University of Leicester

Courses taught

  • BA (Hons) Criminology
  • BA (Hons) Criminology with Psychology

Honours and awards

Upstanding Research and Innovation Award for Outstanding Contribution to Tackling Hatred, Intolerance and Prejudice, #No2H8 Crime Awards 2017

Membership of external committees

Chair of East Midlands Regional Board, Remembering Srebrenica

Leicestershire Police Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel

Membership of professional associations and societies

  • British Society of Criminology
  • Society for the Scientific Study of Religion

Projects

Impact Study for Remembering Srebrenica Aug 2019 - Dec 2019 

Conference attendance

Sadique, K., Tangen, J. & Perowne, A (2018) ‘The Importance of Narrative in Responding to Hate Incidents Following ‘Trigger’ Events: Launch of the National Report for TellMAMA’ invited talk for TellMAMA UK, De Montfort University, 07 December 2018

Sadique, K & Tangen, J (2018) ‘Experiential Learning as Transformative: Teaching about Genocide and Crimes of the State’, delivered to 18th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology [Crimes Against Humans and Crimes Against Humanity], Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, University of Sarajevo 29th Aug-1st Sept 2018

Sadique, K. (2018) Religiously-Motivated Hate Crime: The Churches Response. Church of England Presence and Engagement, Diocesan Inter-Faith Relations Advisers Conference, 16 May 2018, Hayes Conference Centre, Swanwick

Sadique, K. (2018) Mental Health & Spiritual Interventions (Keynote Address) Leicester Women’s Forum ‘Mental Health in the Muslim Community’, 24 February 2018, St Philip’s Centre, Leicester.

Sadique, K. (2018) Religio-Cultural Alternatives to ‘Treatment’ for MH conditions Royal College of Psychiatrists Transcultural SIG Annual Conference, 19 Feb 2018, Royal College of Psychiatry, London

Sadique, K. (2017) Chairs Welcome Address, Inside Government Conference ‘Effectively Reporting, Tackling and Preventing Hate Crime’ 13th December 2017, DeVere West One, London

Chakraborti, N. and Sadique, K. (2017) Moving Beyond the Echo Chamber: Hate Crime in Focus, BSC Midlands Seminar Series, 15 November 2017, De Montfort University

Recent research outputs

Stanislas P., Sadique K. (2019) International Attitudes to Teaching Religion and Faith and the Policing of Minority Communities. In: Albrecht J., den Heyer G., Stanislas P. (eds) Policing and Minority Communities. Springer, Cham, pp 11-27

Sadique, K., Tangen, J. & Perowne, A. (2018) The Importance of Narrative in Responding to Hate Incidents Following ‘Trigger’ Events, [Online] Tell MAMA. Available from https://tellmamauk.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/Tell%20MAMA%20-%20Report.pdf

Current research students

Tina Billington-Hughes (p/t 2019-2025) (Second Supervisor)

Kim is interested in supervising doctoral students working in the following areas:

  • Genocide and State Crime
  • Hate Crime
  • Religion/Crime nexus

Internally funded research project information

#DMUGlobal, De Montfort University: Kim Sadique (Principal Investigator) & Dr James Tangen (Co-Investigator). Funding for two research and educational trips to Krakow, Poland, including visits to Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum and  interviews with educators and guides. These trips were key periods of fieldwork for research exploring the role of emotions in trasformational approaches to teaching about genocide and crimes of the state.

Professional esteem indicators

Research Fellow in South Asian Studies, European Foundation for South Asian Studies, EFSAS, Mar 2017 – present

Executive Member Royal College of Psychiatry, Transcultural Special Interest Group (Specialist Associate Member RCPsych) Jan 2017 – July 2019

Reviews Editor, British Journal of Forensic Practice 2008-2013

Reviewer, Body & Society Journal 2011-present.

Associate Editor, British Journal of Forensic Practice 2007-2008.

Review Editor, Community Safety Journal 2005-2006.

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