Professor Tim Fulford

Job: Professor of English

Faculty: Arts, Design and Humanities

School/department: School of Humanities

Research group(s): Centre for Textual Studies

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, UK, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 250 6239

E: tfulford@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/cts

 

Personal profile

Professor Fulford’s research lies in the area of literature in the Romantic era, in the contexts of colonialism, exploration, science, landscape, the picturesque, religion.  He has published many articles and books on these topics, featuring such writers as William Wordsworth, S. T. Coleridge, Robert Bloomfield, Mary Robinson, William Cowper, Jane Austen and John Clare. Professor Fulford is currently preparing scholarly editions of the letters of Robert Southey and of Humphry Davy.   His next monograph will be a study of the Late Poetry of the Lake Poets.

Research group affiliations

Centre for Textual Studies

Publications and outputs 

  • Wordsworth’s Epistle to Sir George Beaumont: the road twice taken
    Wordsworth’s Epistle to Sir George Beaumont: the road twice taken Fulford, Tim Here, I investigate a later Wordsworth poem in its markedly different 1811 and 1842 versions – the verse epistle to Sir George Beaumont. This epistle, calling upon the country house poems developed by Ben Jonson and upon the topographical rambling of Wordsworth’ own youthful verse, should be seen as an attempt to update to new contexts an old form in which the address of patron by poet had modelled a virtuous sociability exemplified in the moral community of the country estate. His epistle, a missive from a domestic journey that is chatty and yet ordered, reveals Wordsworth forging verse-conditions to reshape the inherited model, so that exemplary community takes the form of intimate, domestic sociability based on the dales family rather than the landed estate. It represents an alternative both to the blank-verse celebration of rustic society that had stalled in ‘Home at Grasmere’ and to the rustic speech that, in 1798, 1800 and 1807, had narrated the troubles of rural folk. Examining the greatly expanded version of 1842, I discuss the role of revision as a mode of renewing the past in which celebratory revival conceals elegiac regret (Wordsworth’s effort to renew destroyed community by writing as if that destruction had not yet occurred revives both the community and the consciousness of its loss). I explore its peculiar tone, its fascinating double perspective, and the complex literary allusions in which the undisclosed fact of death is accommodated, if not resolved.
  • Wordsworth's Poetry 1815-45
    Wordsworth's Poetry 1815-45 Fulford, Tim A single author monograph about Wordsworth's Poetry
  • The Botanic Garden by Erasmus Darwin: Book Review
    The Botanic Garden by Erasmus Darwin: Book Review Fulford, Tim
  • Science and Poetry in 1790s Somerset: the Self-Experiment Narrative, the Aeriform Effusion and the Greater Romantic Lyric
    Science and Poetry in 1790s Somerset: the Self-Experiment Narrative, the Aeriform Effusion and the Greater Romantic Lyric Fulford, Tim An article on scientific and poetic experiments concerning air. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Romantic Hybridity and Historical Poetics: Lyricization and the Elegiac
    Romantic Hybridity and Historical Poetics: Lyricization and the Elegiac Fulford, Tim The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • The Collected Letters of Humphry Davy
    The Collected Letters of Humphry Davy Fulford, Tim; Ruston, Sharon
  • Collected Writings of Robert Bloomfield
    Collected Writings of Robert Bloomfield Fulford, Tim An edition of the writings of the poet and children's writer Robert Bloomfield
  • Romantic Hybridity and Historical Poetics: Lyricization and the Elegiac
    Romantic Hybridity and Historical Poetics: Lyricization and the Elegiac Fulford, Tim This essay engages Historical Poetics in two ways. First, it takes issue with the grand narrative of lyricization as expressed in The Princeton Encyclopedia entry on Lyric, suggesting that its authors project a bias of mid-twentieth century academic critics backwards in time so that it becomes, in their account, an inexorable, if unfortunate, development of the literary history of the last 250 years. This “development,” I show, fails to account for Romantic poetics’ characteristic embrace of hybridity; it also reinforces a divide between “lyric” as a high-culture form and lyric as part of the popular song tradition—neglecting its social and communal aspects. Against the narrative of “lyricization,” I put two instances: first Southey’s hybrid long poems, with their metrical and formal defamiliarization of the normal author/reader relationship; second Wordsworth’s late elegiac poems. What, I ask, does the lyrical tradition look like if we instead consider it as a retrospective elegization—seventeenth-century poems being effectively linked by their formal and verbal adaptation in Wordsworth’s poetry of mourning? It looks, I conclude, less like the subjective, inward confiding of feeling by speaker to listener than “lyricization” contends: elegization produces an imagistic poetic of distilled detachment that is more succinct and more social. Approaching Victorian and Modernist poetry as elegization, in Romanticism’s wake, allows us to focus on formal characteristics that “lyricization,” if accepted as historical fact, prevents us from seeking out. Thus, even the confessional lyrics of Tennyson, Housman and Hardy benefit from being viewed as post-Wordsworthian elegizations: their relationship to Romanticism better understood than by “lyricization.” The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Southey's "Christabel"; Coleridge's Thalaba
    Southey's "Christabel"; Coleridge's Thalaba Fulford, Tim Southey’s “Christabel” abstract In September 1800, while living in Portugal, Robert Southey wrote a verse romance responding to the story of “Christabel.” He composed several hundred lines of poetry about Leoline, a “hell-hag,” a damsel, and her mother the Lady of the Land – intending them for the last book of his Oriental romance Thalaba the Destroyer. They remain little known, although they are preserved in two MS drafts, because Southey dropped them from the poem before publication. The purpose of this article is to make them more easily available to scholars, and to consider what they reveal about Coleridge and Southey as instigators and revisers of each other’s poetry (including their adoption of experimental meters), about the trajectory of Coleridge’s unfinished poem, and about the development of Oriental and gothic romance from its origins in Spenser and Percy. Southey’s Leoline verses were not only one of the first but also one of the best-informed responses to “Christabel”: they were inflected by inside knowledge of Coleridge’s intentions for the poem, and throw light on its second part and on his plans for its completion. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • The Collected Letters of Robert Southey,
    The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Fulford, Tim; Packer, Ian; Pratt, Lynda

Click here for a full listing of Tim Fulford's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

Robert Bloomfield, The Banks of Wye: A Critical Edition. Online edition of Bloomfield’s sketchbook, tour journal and Georgic poem. http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/wye/

Robert Southey: Poetical Works 1811-38, 4 vols, gen. ed. with Lynda Pratt (Pickering and Chatto, 2012) 

Romantic Indians: Native Americans and Transatlantic Literary Culture 1755-1830 (Oxford: O.U.P. 2006)

Literature, Science and Exploration in the Romantic Era: Bodies of Knowledge. Co-written monograph with Debbie Lee and Peter J. Kitson (Cambridge: C.U.P. 2004)

Romanticism and Masculinity (Basingstoke: Macmillan/New York: St Martin’s Press, 1999).

Research interests/expertise

Romanticism, colonialism, exploration, science, landscape, the picturesque, religion. William Wordsworth, S. T. Coleridge, Robert Bloomfield, Mary Robinson, William Cowper, Jane Austen, John Clare, Robert Southey, Humphry Davy.

Areas of teaching

Romanticism, Gothic.

Qualifications

MA, PhD

Professional esteem indicators

Professor Fulford is on the Editorial Boards of the journals Romanticism, European Romantic Review, The Wordsworth Circle, Romanticism and Victorianism Online, Essays in Romanticism and of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism.  He is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College and of the AHRC Peer Review Panel.

Tim Fulford

Search Who's Who

Romanticism and Masculinity

Romantic Indians

Literature, Science and Exploration in the Romantic Era

 
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