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Professor Tim Fulford

Job: Professor of English

Faculty: Arts, Design and Humanities

School/department: School of Humanities

Research group(s): Centre for Textual Studies

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, UK, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 250 6239

E: tfulford@dmu.ac.uk

W: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/cts

 

Personal profile

Professor Fulford’s research lies in the area of literature in the Romantic era, in the contexts of colonialism, exploration, science, landscape, the picturesque, religion.  He has published many articles and books on these topics, featuring such writers as William Wordsworth, S. T. Coleridge, Robert Bloomfield, Mary Robinson, William Cowper, Jane Austen and John Clare. Professor Fulford is currently preparing scholarly editions of the letters of Robert Southey and of Humphry Davy.   His next monograph will be a study of the Late Poetry of the Lake Poets.

Research group affiliations

Centre for Textual Studies

Publications and outputs

  • Mont Blanc Imagined: Poetry, Science and the Prospect-View in Davy and Coleridge
    Mont Blanc Imagined: Poetry, Science and the Prospect-View in Davy and Coleridge Fulford, Tim The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.
  • Metaphysics in the Circle of Thomas Beddoes, Thomas Wedgwood, S. T. Coleridge
    Metaphysics in the Circle of Thomas Beddoes, Thomas Wedgwood, S. T. Coleridge Fulford, Tim The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.
  • Humphry Davy, Jane Marcet and the Cultures of Romantic-Era Science
    Humphry Davy, Jane Marcet and the Cultures of Romantic-Era Science Fulford, Tim The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.
  • Patronage, Philosophy, and Publicity: Thomas Wedgwood, Thomas Beddoes, and the Pneumatic Institution
    Patronage, Philosophy, and Publicity: Thomas Wedgwood, Thomas Beddoes, and the Pneumatic Institution Fulford, Tim
  • Robert Southey, The Life of Horatio, Lord Nelson
    Robert Southey, The Life of Horatio, Lord Nelson Fulford, Tim The Life of Nelson is one of Robert Southey’s most influential and bestselling works. This new edition will contain a comprehensive critical apparatus that will make sense of the major issues posed by the text and how it contributes to studies of both Southey and Romanticism. The edition will feature a critical and contextual introduction, which will set out the origins and composition of the text together with its publication history, as well as offer a carefully considered view of the interplay between the Life and other biographies of Nelson, bringing into view the wide array of sources and influences Southey drew from.
  • Ecopoetics and Boyopoetics: Bloomfield, Clare and the Nature of Lyric
    Ecopoetics and Boyopoetics: Bloomfield, Clare and the Nature of Lyric Fulford, Tim This article investigates the ecological lyrics of Robert Bloomfield and John Clare, suggesting that the elision of adult subject-positions in the latter was influenced by the pioneering poetry of the former. An alternative to the sublime egotism of William Wordsworth, and to the “Greater Romantic Lyric” as defined by twentieth-century criticism, Bloomfield’s and Clare’s eco-poetry is characterized by a delicate, intricate and valuable lyricism that does not use nature as a sounding-bound for a supposedly timeless, bourgeois male subjectivity. But it was shaped as much by the book market—by class-based restrictions on laboring-class men’s access to print—as by the poets’ exceptionally selfless environmentalism. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Pantheistic Poetry; Geological Touring; Chemical Experimentation: Coleridge and Davy in the Mountains and on the Page
    Pantheistic Poetry; Geological Touring; Chemical Experimentation: Coleridge and Davy in the Mountains and on the Page Fulford, Tim COLERIDGE‘S CONTINUING ENGAGEMENT WITH PANTHEISM has been a staple of scholarly discussion since, at least, Thomas McFarland‘s Coleridge and the Pantheist Tradition.1 More recently, historically-nuanced revisions of McFarland‘s account have been provided by Richard Berkeley, Nicholas Halmi, and Maximilien van Woudenberg.2 In this process, the significance on Coleridge‘s philosophical and theological thought of his German sojourn of 1798-99 has come into renewed focus. In what follows I examine a less- discussed aspect of Coleridge‘s engagement with pantheism at Göttingen University—its imbrication with what is now called earth science but was then known as natural history. This imbrication, I suggest, shaped Coleridge‘s engagement with nature—the landscape—in 1799, allowing him to adopt a pantheistic view of the world purged of what he had come to see as the atheistic materialism of his mid-1790s influences. In turn, this Coleridgean engagement became one of the formative influences on the nascent culture of geological enquiry in England. It was taken up in the social practice of field investigation and in the model of enquiry adopted by Coleridge‘s friends, who went on, in 1807, to found the world‘s first geological society. I focus in particular on one of these friends—Humphry Davy. Coleridgean Spinozism became one of several shaping influences on Davy‘s conception of nature as a single dynamic ̳economy‘ of processes. Insofar as Davy made important discoveries about nature—isolating new elements and revealing that the interaction of electrical and chemical forces held matter together—then this conception can be said to have had significant effects.
  • The Collected Letters of Humphry Davy
    The Collected Letters of Humphry Davy Fulford, Tim; Ruston, Sharon
  • Wordsworth Elegizing the Lyrical Ballad in the 1830s and 1840s
    Wordsworth Elegizing the Lyrical Ballad in the 1830s and 1840s Fulford, Tim
  • Davy Takes to the Hills: Dialogic Enquiry and the Aesthetics of the Prospect View
    Davy Takes to the Hills: Dialogic Enquiry and the Aesthetics of the Prospect View Fulford, Tim A study of the social culture in which the science of geology was developed. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Click here for a full listing of Tim Fulford's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

Robert Bloomfield, The Banks of Wye: A Critical Edition. Online edition of Bloomfield’s sketchbook, tour journal and Georgic poem. http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/wye/

Robert Southey: Poetical Works 1811-38, 4 vols, gen. ed. with Lynda Pratt (Pickering and Chatto, 2012) 

Romantic Indians: Native Americans and Transatlantic Literary Culture 1755-1830 (Oxford: O.U.P. 2006)

Literature, Science and Exploration in the Romantic Era: Bodies of Knowledge. Co-written monograph with Debbie Lee and Peter J. Kitson (Cambridge: C.U.P. 2004)

Romanticism and Masculinity (Basingstoke: Macmillan/New York: St Martin’s Press, 1999).

Research interests/expertise

Romanticism, colonialism, exploration, science, landscape, the picturesque, religion. William Wordsworth, S. T. Coleridge, Robert Bloomfield, Mary Robinson, William Cowper, Jane Austen, John Clare, Robert Southey, Humphry Davy.

Areas of teaching

Romanticism, Gothic.

Qualifications

MA, PhD

Professional esteem indicators

Professor Fulford is on the Editorial Boards of the journals Romanticism, European Romantic Review, The Wordsworth Circle, Romanticism and Victorianism Online, Essays in Romanticism and of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism.  He is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College and of the AHRC Peer Review Panel.

Tim Fulford
Romanticism and Masculinity

Romantic Indians

Literature, Science and Exploration in the Romantic Era