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Ms Sally Doughty

Job: Associate Professor Dance; Reader in Dance and Improvisation; Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Dance (CIRID); Associate Head of School (Performance);

Faculty: Arts, Design and Humanities

School/department: School of Visual and Performing Arts

Research group(s): Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Dance (CIRID); Institute of Drama, Dance and Performance Studies

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, UK, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 257 7834

E: sdoughty@dmu.ac.uk

W: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/arts

 

Personal profile

Sally Doughty has an international reputation as a facilitator and performer of improvisational practices, and has established her profile over two decades as an artist and academic in the field. She has choreographed, taught and performed in USA, Latvia, Mexico, Berlin, Brussels, Paris, Estonia and variously throughout the UK. Her published articles (Choreographic Practices; Performance Research;  Research in Dance Education and Theatre Insight) and book chapters emerge from her practice and she writes from a first person perspective – privileging the voice of the artist herself. Recent chapters include Body, Space, Object: Dialogues between Art and Dance; body^space^object (2020); Dance Fields: Where is Dance Studies now? (2020), and The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation (2019).  Sally is produced by Dance4 (UK) and supported by Arts Council England for several practice research projects: Renaissance (2015) in which she interrogated making improvised dance performance for mid-scale venues; This is... (2017), which interrogates memory and improvisation;  Body of Knowledge (2016) and Please Do Touch (2018), which focus on investigating and promoting the dancer’s body as a corporeal archive. Each project has culminated in practical and published outputs. Sally is co-Principal Investigator in a research project that addresses The identity of hybrid dance artist-academics working across academia and the professional arts sector. Sally supervises Doctoral and Masters students and teaches across studio and classroom based modules at undergraduate level. 

Research group affiliations

  • Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Dance (CIRID)
  • Institute of Drama, Dance and Performance Studies

Publications and outputs 

  • This is...where we are now
    This is...where we are now Doughty, Sally; Shenton, Pete This chapter responds to the heading of ‘Disruptions and Confluences of Dance Studies’ and is informed by the performance This is… where we are now that was presented by the two authors at the Dance Fields conference. The performance uses dancing and speaking to investigate how memory can serve as a fundamental line of enquiry to produce improvised contemporary performance. This is… where we are now develops multiple layers of meaning for both performers and audience through the interrelationship of movement and text. Doughty and Shenton recall and tell personal memories that are positioned concurrently with – at times – seemingly unrelated movement material. It operates at the intersections between individual, collective and confluent memory to produce witty, thought provoking and unexpected commentaries on one’s past and present self. It asks performers and audience alike to consider ‘where are we now?’ at any one moment during the work, and Doughty and Shenton use that same question here to interrogate the intersection of practice and theory. The chapter challenges the tensions that (still) exist between practice-as-research and academic research by locating the text that evolved during performance within a scholarly frame, promoting it as a mode of knowing. A transcription of Doughty’s and Shenton’s performative text forms the backbone of the chapter, offering readers an insight into the multiple, complex and spontaneous decision making processes that are at play during an improvised performance, and privileging practice-as-research merely through its inclusion in the book. A video of the performance (https://vimeo.com/214462246) further disseminates the work as a practice-based output and images of the performance will be peppered throughout. The chapter is structured into three distinct parts: a preparatory section outlines the context for and purpose of the performance, and promotes the performative act as a means of knowledge production. The transcription of the text forms the second section and whilst this can stand alone, the video of This is… where we are now deepens the understanding of the work’s development, its use of improvisation in dance and spoken performance and emphasises practice-as-research. The performance text is therefore represented through a mixed economy of written and spoken word. The final section makes reference to various publications authored by dance artists that promote the practice of writing that evolves through and from movement practices, and which support alternative readings and multiple types of engagement with practice. Positioning the performative words from This is… where we are now in this chapter elevates practice onto an equal par with theory, thus blurring the boundaries in practice and scholarly research to offer a valuable intervention to academic outputs and discourse. This is… where we are now is supported by Arts Council England, Dance4 and De Montfort University.
  • Please Do Touch
    Please Do Touch Doughty, Sally; Krische, Rachel; Kendall, Lisa Collaborating on a research project entitled 'Body of Knowledge', dance artists and academics Sally Doughty, Lisa Kendall and Rachel Krische explore how the dancer’s body can be considered as a living, corporeal archive. 'Please Do Touch' continues this journey, developing this research into a performance work that inhabits DMU's Leicester Gallery. Drawing upon past experiences, movement and conversation, they consider how embodied memory can be as resonant and as rich in history as the exhibits on display in the galleries. A series of evolving performance encounters takes place between the performers and audience throughout the gallery. This new work aims to provoke the personal memories of the audience as the performers recall and share their own histories through movement, spoken and sung choreographic responses. Please Do Touch is produced by Dance4 and in partnership with New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, De Montfort University and Leeds Beckett University. Supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.
  • HOURGLASS: MARK-MAKING IN AND AS PERFORMANCE
    HOURGLASS: MARK-MAKING IN AND AS PERFORMANCE Doughty, Sally In 2015, the author was commissioned by Dance4 to make an improvised dance performance, titled Hourglass, in response to artefacts from Robert Wilson’s seminal opera Einstein on the Beach (1976) exhibited at Backlit Gallery, Nottingham, UK. Reflecting upon the rehearsals and performances, the author addresses the specific themes of ‘what happens when we draw with or from the body’ and ‘choreography as drawing with and from the body’ to reveal how she used drawing in the performance as a means of documentation. The author articulates how her drawings act as a choreographic score that serves the dual function of documenting Hourglass and generating a new performance. It is a relatively common occurrence that performance is documented by someone other than the artist and from a position external to the work, which can establish ‘a distinct tension […] between the performer and documenter’ (Woolley 2014, p. 59). Through developing strategies for embedding her own documentation of Hourglass into the performance itself, the author writes from an in-vivo perspective to disrupt this normative distinction between performer and documenter. She proposes that the nature of her documentation through mark-making in performance collapses any suggestion of such ‘tension’ and offers instead an embodied and embedded practice of drawing in and as performance. Documenting Hourglass through drawing was not an additional imposition of practice-as-research but instead was integral to the artistic practice (Nelson 2013, p.87) and the underlying thrust of the performance. The author provides the context for her own drawing in performance by examining the work of other dance and performance artists who have employed strategies for drawing and performing, such as Si Rawlinson (Ink, 2017), Trisha Brown (Untitled, 2007), La Ribot (No. 26, 1997) and Carolee Schneeman (Tracking, 1973). Broadly speaking, the burgeoning literature and other source materials that cite these artists amongst many others who make marks during performance, refers to practices in which the marks are made as a result of the moving body being in direct contact with the mark-receiving surface, so that the movement of the artist generates line (Le Mens 2014, p102). However, in Hourglass, the author made drawings by hand in response to movement that she had already made during the performance, as opposed to drawings made by the full-body in motion in the moment of moving. Therefore, in this chapter, she proposes that her drawing methodology challenges the more established, familiar methods of artists such as Brown, Schneeman and Rawlinson, and addrsses a gap in contemporary performance practices and literature that refers to these two forms. The author goes on to discuss how her interrogation of methods used to draw Hourglass gave rise to her design of a wearable canvas that was integrated into the costume, onto which she hand-drew key features from the performance such as spatial pathways; movement/vocal material and moments of interaction with audience members, during the performance. Towards the end of the performance, the author repurposed the wearable canvas by removing it from her costume and hanging it in the gallery space as an exhibit. This contributed to the artefacts from the opera and evolved as archival material arising from Hourglass, but functioned also as a compositional score to inform a future performance work titled Hourglass: Archive as Muse (Doughty, October 2015). Drawing and mark making is an established and well documented approach to making compositional scores for improvised performances. The author will draw upon her experience of working with leading movement improvisers Nina Martin and Lin Snelling, to exemplify the role that mark making plays in their practices and discuss how this informed her personal approach to drawing in Hourglass. The drawing’s dual function of documenting existing and generating new performance will be discussed here. The author identifies parallels between drawing and improvising in performance, and articulates how her approach to making spontaneous decisions in one form is reflected in and informs the other. This chapter aims to contribute to the literature and contemporary performance practices that address dancing and drawing by proposing a strategy that challenges many of the established and documented mainstream approaches.
  • Please Do Touch
    Please Do Touch Doughty, Sally; Krische, Rachel; Kendall, Lisa This abstract is for a live dance performance titled Please Do Touch, which responds fully to the themes of the ‘Modes of Capture’ symposium. Collaborating on a research project titled Body of Knowledge, dance artist/academics Sally Doughty, Lisa Kendall and Rachel Krische interrogate how the dancer can be considered as a living archive to generate new performance work. Please Do Touch is one outcome of this project. Conceived to be performed in gallery or museum spaces, it privileges ourselves as rich artefacts and challenges traditional notions of what an archive might be. Please Do Touch aims to provoke the audiences’ personal memories as we recall and share our own histories through improvised movement, spoken and sung responses. We consider how embodied memory can be resonant and rich in history, and how active re-calling provokes the re-emergence of what was once ‘forgotten’ concurrently with the emergence of new configurations of embodied response/thinking to generate new performance. As Brian Massumi observes, ‘[our memories’] reactivation helps trigger a new event which continues the creative process from which they came, but in a new iteration’ (2016: 6) and thus our practice is conceived of as ‘an anarchive’ (Massumi 2016: 6). Please Do Touch opens up debate around the body as an archive: what it means to document/generate, re-call and re-configure our histories (in the now) and how transferable this thinking can be to a non-dancing body.
  • I Notice that I'm Noticing
    I Notice that I'm Noticing Doughty, Sally This essay considers the concept of noticing in improvisational movement practices and interrogates how what and how we notice can have a significant impact on movement material that is spontaneously composed. This essay takes as its starting point the premise that the act of noticing is a conscious and active form of engagement, and then goes on to discuss this in relation to what and how dance artists notice in the moment of improvising. The author draws from her experience of studying with leading improvisers but primary focus is on the author’s experience of working with American dance maker Deborah Hay in her 2011 Solo Performance Commissioning Project (SPCP). Interviews with dance artists Simon Ellis and Matthias Sperling provide further in-vivo perspectives in order to exemplify the significance of noticing in Hay’s performance practice.
  • Please Do Touch
    Please Do Touch Doughty, Sally; Kendall, Lisa; Krische, Rachel Collaborating on a research project entitled 'Body of Knowledge', dance artists and academics Sally Doughty, Lisa Kendall and Rachel Krische explore how the dancer’s body can be considered as a living, corporeal archive. 'Please Do Touch' continues this journey, developing this research into a specially commissioned performance work that inhabits the New Walk Gallery and Museum. Drawing upon past experiences, movement and conversation, they consider how embodied memory can be as resonant and as rich in history as the exhibits on display in the galleries. A series of evolving performance encounters takes place between the performers and audience throughout the different gallery spaces. This new work aims to provoke the personal memories of the audience as the performers recall and share their own histories through movement, spoken and sung choreographic responses. Please Do Touch is produced by Dance4 and in partnership with New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, De Montfort University and Leeds Beckett University. Supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.
  • This is...
    This is... Doughty, Sally; Shenton, Pete This is… responds to multiple themes outlined for Performatica 2018 that are currently very pertinent for Mexico, as well as in a global context. The following themes have particular resonance for the proposed performance: - Am I aware of the body's possibilities within its own limits? - How do we adapt ourselves as a community? - In what way do we create spaces in order to dwell in them? - What is our capacity to understand global and intellectual diversity? This is…. uses dancing and speaking to investigate how memory can serve as a fundamental line of enquiry to produce improvised contemporary dance performance. It aims to extend the boundaries that exist for this genre and in doing so, it explicitly engages the audience so that they might be moved to reflect on their own experiences. Performers Doughty and Shenton recall and tell individual personal memories that are positioned concurrently with - at times - seemingly unrelated movement material, which prompts performers and audience to consider 'how one thing connects to the next thing… [and that] within this passage of relation lies the logic, narrative, pattern or subject that we, as human beings, are bound to look for' (Burrows 2010: 111). Operating at the intersections between individual and collective memory, 'This is…' aims to create a space in which performers and audience have a shared experience with a particular resonance on ideas of community; coming together and the current Mexico/USA political tensions. The improvised methodology supports the development of witty, moving, thought provoking and unexpected commentaries on one's past, present and future self.
  • The Holding Space: Body Of (As) Knowledge
    The Holding Space: Body Of (As) Knowledge Doughty, Sally; Krische, Rachel; Kendall, Lisa Body Of (As) Knowledge (BOK) is a collaborative practice-based research project reflecting and expanding upon the practices of dance artist-scholars Sally Doughty, Lisa Kendall and Rachel Krische. BOK examines the body as a living archive, focusing on the collection, articulation and dissemination of the moving body as opposed to more traditional archival materials of artefacts and documents. This multi-stranded project engages with Derby Museum Trust to develop understanding of how traditional processes of archiving work, and includes performative outcomes presented in the museum space, NottDance (2017) and InDialogue Symposium (2016). The three authors propose a radical contribution to the publication in the form of a link to an online holding space for this research project. The digital holding space is a repository for film, audio and written documentation of BOK and seeks to highlight and privilege the assertion that the moving body acts as a living resource of archival information. The authors recognise the inherent contradiction of constructing an online artefact of this living, embodied project, and therefore propose that the online resource, in correlation with the concept of the moving body as archive, has a finite life-span. The authors will utilise encryption technology that makes electronic data ‘self-destruct’ after a specified period of time: the holding space will ‘erode’ or ‘rust’ as time passes, and after a certain point the online document can no longer be read (Bleeker 2012: 1). Therefore, the content held on-line remains only in the memories, bodies and practices of the three artist-scholars and the readers who engage with the online artefacts within the identified timeframe. Challenging the traditional notion that ‘the archive [is] that which endures’ (Roms 2013: 45), this contribution promotes a time-sensitive archive which is ‘subject to change, or even disappearance’ (ibid), to reflect the condition of a mortal, corporeal archive.
  • Hourglass: mark-making in and as performance
    Hourglass: mark-making in and as performance Doughty, Sally This proposal responds to the specific themes of 'what happens when we draw with or from the body'; 'choreography as drawing with and from the body' and 'performative drawing - witness or viewer'. It aims to reveal the processes that are implicit within the author's methods of documenting an improvised performance through drawing and mark-making, and how the resulting documentation has the potential to act as a choreographic score to generate new performance work. The author reflects upon a performance commission that she received from Dance4 in 2015 to make an improvised performance in response to artefacts from Robert Wilson's opera Einstein on the Beach (1976) on exhibition at Backlit Gallery, Nottingham. She gave two performances of the hour-long work, titled Hourglass, at the gallery on Saturday 9 May 2015. She articulates her approach to documenting Hourglass from an in-vivo perspective. Treating the exhibits on display as a multi-modal document of the opera's development and performances, Doughty developed strategies for embedding her own documentation of Hourglass into the performance itself. In doing so, she disrupted the normative distinction between the roles of performer and documenter so that the performance's documentation was not conceived of as an additional imposition of practice-as-research but instead, was integral to the artistic practice (Nelson 2013, p.87). Interrogating methods for documenting or 'scoring' Hourglass gave rise to the design of wearable canvases that were integrated into the costume, onto which Doughty hand-drew key features from the performance, such as spatial pathways; movement/vocal material and moments of interaction with audience members, during the performance. Towards the end of each performance the wearable scores were repurposed as she removed each wearable canvas from the costume and hung them in the gallery space as exhibits, thus contributing to the artefacts from the opera's history. The author provides the context for her own drawing in performance by examining the work of dance and performance artists including Trisha Brown (Untitled 2007), Carolee Schneeman (Tracking 1973) and Si Rawlinson (Ink 2017) who have developed strategies for drawing in performance that 'encode movement' (Roben 2012). She proposes an alternative method of documenting that challenges a body of literature and artists' methods of documenting, in which the body gives rise to the mark in the moment of moving. It is a relatively common occurrence that performance is documented by someone other than the artist and from a position external to the work. Michael Woolley observes that 'a distinct tension exists between the performer and documenter' (2014, p. 59), and the author proposes that the nature of her documentation through mark-making in performance collapsed any suggestion of such 'tension', offering instead an embodied and embedded practice of documentation that arose seamlessly through the performance. Nelson notes that when documenting, 'the literal, indexical function of words is less useful than more poetic modes' (2013, p.90) and this is reflected in the mode of drawing undertaken during the performance of Hourglass. The mark-making shifted from a representational style of drawing to a technique that included Doughty's personal responses and a more poetic commentary on the work. The process and creative potential of treating the hand-drawn scores as archival material from Hourglass to inform new performance work such as Hourglass: Archive as Muse (Doughty, October 2015) will be discussed here, concluding that drawing in performance has the dual potential to document and generate.
  • This is...where we are now
    This is...where we are now Doughty, Sally; Shenton, Pete This performance by Sally Doughty and Pete Shenton responds explicitly to the conference theme of ‘where are we now?’ in relation to both histories and confluences. The performance is a 25 minute excerpt titled This is… from a full-length dance performance, titled Renaissance, which uses dancing and speaking to investigate how memory can serve as a fundamental line of enquiry to produce improvised contemporary performance. This is… is designed to develop multiple layers of meaning for both performers and audience through the interrelationship of movement and text. It demands that Doughty and Shenton recall and tell individual personal memories that are positioned concurrently with – at times – seemingly unrelated movement material, which prompts performers and audience to consider ‘how one thing connects to the next thing… [and that] within this passage of relation lies the logic, narrative, pattern or subject that we, as human beings, are bound to look for (Burrows 2010: 111). Memory, as the driver in the work, places dual creative and performative demands on us as performers, which is to generate improvised movement and speech drawing from memory, and to commit (as much) of it to memory (as we can) in order to revisit and conclude it later on. As Hannah Ewence observes, ‘History and memory can, and do, successfully overlap and crossfertilize’ (2013: p.160) and in this instance, it does so to produce new improvised performance. This is…. operates at the intersections between individual, collective and confluent memory to produce witty, moving, thought provoking and unexpected commentaries on one’s past and present self. It asks performers and audience alike to consider ‘where are we now? at any one moment in the work. Renissance is supported by Arts Council England, Dance4 and De Montfort University.

Click here to view a full listing of Sally Doughty's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

PRACTICAL OUTPUTS:

DOUGHTY, S., KENDALL, L. and KRISCHE, R. (2020) 'Please Do Touch'. Performance at Leicester Gallery. Friday 28 February 2020.

DOUGHTY, S., KENDALL, L. and KRISCHE, R. (2019) ‘Please Do Touch’, at Modes of Capture: The Capturing of Process in Contemporary Dance-Making conference. Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, Ireland.  22nd June 2019.

DOUGHTY, S., KENDALL, L. and KRISCHE, R. (2018) 'Please Do Touch'. Performance at Leicester New Walk Museum and Arts Gallery. Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 December 2018.

DOUGHTY S. and SHENTON, P. (2018) ‘This is…', at Performatica International Dance Festival. Cholula, Mexico. 15 March 2018.

DOUGHTY S. and SHENTON, P. (2017) ‘This Is… Where We Are Now’, at Dance Fields: Staking a Claim for Dance in the 21st Century. Roehampton University, London, Friday 21 April 2017.

DOUGHTY, S. et al (2017) Body of Knowledge at Nottingham Castle Museum and Arts Gallery, NottDance International Festival, Sunday 12 March 2017.

DOUGHTY, S. and KRISCHE, R. (2016) ‘Handle with Care’, at InDialogue conference, Nottingham Contemporary, Thursday 1 December 2016.

DOUGHTY, S. (2015) 'Hourglass' at Backlit Gallery, Nottingham, 12 May 2015. Commissioned by Dance4.

DOUGHTY, S. et al (2015) Renaissance, at Dance4 International Centre for Choreography, NottDance International Festival, Friday 10 March 2017; Nottingham Playhouse, 13 July 2016.

DOUGHTY, S. (2011). I Think Not, thefidget space, Philadelphia, USA, 9 November 2012; Polymer Culture Factory and Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn, Estonia, 20 and 21 October 2012; Embrace Arts Centre, Leicester, 8 March 2012.

DOUGHTY, S (2007) une danse pour la radio: deux, SDHS/CORD Conference on Rethinking Practice and Theory, June, Paris. 

DOUGHTY,  S. (2006) a dance for radio. Laiks Dejot Festival, Riga, Latvia (2007); Royal Opera House, London (2006); Nottdance International Dance Festival, Nottingham (2006); University of Texas at Austin (2006); Laban Centre, London (2006, 2008); Cultural Exchanges, DMU, Leicester (2006/2008/2012)

PUBLICATIONS:

DOUGHTY, S. and SHENTON, P. (2020) ‘This Is… Where We Are Now’ in David, A., Huxley, M. and Whatley, S. (eds) Dance Fields: Where is Dance Studies Now? Hampshire, Dance Books. pp: 204-217.

DOUGHTY, S. (2020) 'Hourglass: Mark-making In and As Performance'. In: Journeaux, J., Gorrill, H., Reed, S. (Eds.) Body, Space, and Place in Collective and Collaborative Drawing: Drawing Conversations II. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars. pp 67-84.

DOUGHTY, S. (2019) ‘I Notice That I’m Noticing…’ in Midgelow, V. (ed). Oxford Handbook of Improvisation. Oxford, Oxford University Press. pp 119-134.

DOUGHTY, S. et al. (2018) ‘The Holding Space: Body of (as) Knowledge’ in forthcoming body^space^object edited collection. Basingstoke, Palgrave Publishers. Publication date tbc.

DOUGHTY, S. and Fitzpatrick, M. (2016) ‘The Identity of Hybrid Dance Artist- Academics Working Across Academia and the Professional Arts Sector’ in Choreographic Practices: Questioning the Contemporary in 21st Century British Dance. Intellect Press. Vol 7(1), April 2016

DOUGHTY, S. et al. (2015) Will You Play? Implications of Audience Interventions in Improvised Dance Performance’ in Choreographic Practices: Questioning the Contemporary in 21st Century British Dance. Intellect Press. Vol 6(2), October 2015.

DOUGHTY, S. et al (2008) Technological enhancements in the teaching and learning of reflective and creative practice in dance, Research in Dance Education. 9: 2, pp.129 – 146.

DOUGHTY, S, and MANGAN, M. (2004) On Civility – Quarantine Theatre’s EatEat, ‘Performance Research Journal’, December: 10:1. 

PERFORMATIVE CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS:

DOUGHTY, S. (2016) ‘Body Of/As Knowledge’. Performance presentation at the Body^Space^Object^Memory^Identity conference, Coventry University, Friday 20 May 2016

DOUGHTY, S. (2015) ‘Hourglass: Archive as Muse’. Performance presentation at Questioning the Contemporary: Rethinking Process, Practice and Product in 21stCentury Contemporary Dance Practices symposium at Leeds Beckett University, 16-17th October 2015.

DOUGHTY, S. et al. (2014) ‘Keep That…Leave That! Implications for the Audience in Co-Authored Improvised Performance’ at Questioning the Contemporary in 21st Century Dance Practices Symposium, Leeds Metropolitan University, 18 July 2014.

CONFERENCE PAPERS:

DOUGHTY, S. (2017) 'Hourglass: Mark-Making in and as Performance' at Drawing Conversations 2: Body, Space, Object Conference, Coventry University, Friday 8 December 2017.

DOUGHTY, S. and FITZPATRICK, M. (2017) ‘The Identity of the Hybrid Dance Artist/Academic’. Keynote speech at Challenging Futures in Dance, Drama and Music conference. University of Huddersfield, 7 and 8 April 2017.       

DOUGHTY, S. and FITZPATRICK, M. (2014) Mapping the Landscape: The Identity of Dance Artist-Scholars Working Across Academia and the Professional Arts Sector, at Independent Dance, London, 17 September 2014; Questioning the Contemporary in 21st Century Dance Practices, Leeds Metropolitan University, 18 July 2014; Inventing Futures conference, ArtEZ, Arnhem, The Netherlands. Tuesday 3 December 2013.

DOUGHTY, S. and FRANCKSEN, K. (2014) ‘Emergent Learning Strategies: Inspiring the Learners’ Sense of Agency and Autonomy through Practice’ at the HEA Annual Conference, Aston University, Birmingham, July 2014.   

DOUGHTY, S. (2006) Improvisation: What Do I Do and Why Do I Do It? PALATINE Improvisation Pedagogy Study Day, Leeds School of Music, May 2006 and Teacher Fellow Conference, ‘Teaching and Research: Forging new relationships’, DMU, June.

DOUGHTY, S. and STEVENS, J. (2002) ‘Seeing Myself Dance: Video and Reflective Learning in Dance Technique’ delivered at the Finding the Balance Conference at Liverpool John Moores University, 21 – 23 June 2002.

EXHIBITIONS:

DOUGHTY, S. (2015) ‘Hourglassat Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA) Practice-as-Research Exhibition at the University of Worcester, 8 – 10 September 2015.

                                                                                                             

Research interests/expertise

  • Corporeal/extended archives
  • Memory/autobiography
  • Improvisation as performance
  • Improvisation as a means of generating movement in the rehearsal process for a fixed performance
  • Practice as research
  • Documentation and articulation of processes/practices involved in performance making and doing
  • Contemporary choreography
  • The practice of performing
  • Reflective practice:
    - developing a framework that develops analytical and reflective skills in those involved in movement improvisation
    - employing a range of technology/media to support student’s learning
  • Pedagogic Research

Areas of teaching

  • Movement improvisation
  • Contact improvisation
  • Choreography
  • Performance 
  • Contemporary dance technique
  • Promoting dance
  • Reflective practice
  • Documentation of practice

Qualifications

MA by Independent Study: improvisation as a creative tool in the rehearsal process

BA (Hons) Performing Arts: Dance

Courses taught

  • BA (Hons) Dance
  • BA (Hons) Performing Arts
  • MA Performance Practices

Honours and awards

DMU Teacher Fellow, 1 August 2010. For excellence in teaching and learning.

DMU Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award, 2009. Voted by students for outstanding teaching.

Membership of external committees

2015 - 2016: Board Member for Decoda

2012–2016: Board member for UK Young Artists.

2007 – 2009: Member of the project advisory board for "Embodied Generative Music: An Investigation of the Relation Between Bodily and Musical Expression", an art/science research project based at the University of Music and Dramatic Arts, Graz, Austria.

Membership of professional associations and societies

Fellow of the HEA (2002) 

Forthcoming events

 

Conference attendance

DOUGHTY, S. (2017) ‘Hourglass: Mark-Making in and as Performance’ at Drawing Conversations 2: Body, Space, Object conference, Coventry University, Friday 8 December 2017.

DOUGHTY, S. and FITZPATRICK, M. (2017) ‘The Identity of the Hybrid Dance Artist/Academic’. Keynote speech at Challenging Futures in Dance, Drama and Music conference. University of Huddersfield, 7 and 8 April 2017.       

DOUGHTY, S. (2016) ‘Body Of/As Knowledge’. Performance presentation at the Body^Space^Object^Memory^Identity conference, Coventry University, Friday 20 May 2016

DOUGHTY, S. (2016) Managed and curated symposium: Dance Improvisation: The Estranged Cousin, at Attenborough Arts Centre, Leicester. Saturday 12 March 2016.

DOUGHTY, S. (2015) ‘Hourglass: Archive as Muse’. Performance presentation at Questioning the Contemporary: Rethinking Process, Practice and Product in 21stCentury Contemporary Dance Practices symposium at Leeds Beckett University, 16-17th October 2015.

DOUGHTY, S. and FITZPATRICK, M. (2014) Mapping the Landscape: The Identity of Dance Artist-Scholars Working Across Academia and the Professional Arts Sector, at Independent Dance, London, 17 September 2014; Questioning the Contemporary in 21st Century Dance Practices, Leeds Metropolitan University, 18 July 2014; Inventing Futures conference, ArtEZ, Arnhem, The Netherlands. Tuesday 3 December 2013.

DOUGHTY, S. et al. (2014) ‘Keep That…Leave That! Implications for the Audience in Co-Authored Improvised Performance’ at Questioning the Contemporary in 21st Century Dance Practices Symposium, Leeds Metropolitan University, 18 July 2014.

DOUGHTY, S. and FRANCKSEN, K. (2014) ‘Emergent Learning Strategies: Inspiring the Learners’ Sense of Agency and Autonomy through Practice’ at the HEA Annual Conference, Aston University, Birmingham, July 2014.   

DOUGHTY, S. (2012) Thinking about I Think Not,  at the Improvisation Practices Symposium, University of Northampton, 26 June 2012. 

DOUGHTY, S. (2006) Improvisation: What Do I Do and Why Do I Do It? PALATINE Improvisation Pedagogy Study Day, Leeds School of Music, May 2006 and Teacher Fellow Conference, ‘Teaching and Research: Forging new relationships’, DMU, June.

DOUGHTY, S. and STEVENS, J. (2002) ‘Seeing Myself Dance: Video and Reflective Learning in Dance Technique’ delivered at the Finding the Balance Conference at Liverpool John Moores University, 21 – 23 June 2002.

Current research students

1st supervisor for:

Angharad Harrop 

Jessica Murray (M4C)

Marguerite Caruana Galizia 

2nd supervisor for:

Lucy Ovenall

Matthias Sperling (M3C)

Madeleine Kerslake 

3rd supervisor for:

Louisa Petts (M4C)

 

 

Externally funded research grants information

2018: As PI, Grant for the Arts, Arts Council England (£11,039) to undertake Please Do Touch research project.

2016: As PI, Grant for the Arts, Arts Council England (£5,100) to undertake the Body of Knowledge research project,

2015: As PI, Grant for the Arts, Arts Council England (£13,170) to undertake the Renaissance research project and I plan to submit a second application in 2018 to produce the work.

2015: As PI, I performance commission of £7,860 from Dance4 to interrogate improvised performance

2013: As CI, Grant for the Arts, Arts Council England (£13,000) to support and develop activities and audience engagement as part of Quick Shifts improvisation collective.

2004: As PI, AHRC small grant funding (£3,832) for practice-based research project The still moving body – disposing of, recycling and documenting improvisation that resulted in a performance output, a dance for radio.

Internally funded research project information

Improvisation: what do I do and why do I do it?  Pedagogic Research Project funded by Centre for Excellence in Performing Arts, De Montfort University.  2006 and 2007.  Sole researcher. 

Professional esteem indicators

2017: Keynote address on Hybrid Dance Artist-Academic research project at Challenging Futures in Dance, Drama and Music conference, University of Huddersfield, 8 April 2017.Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy 2012/2012: peer reviewer

2016: Granted University Research Leave from January – May 2016.

2014: Invited by Dance4 to represent the UK in an international online conversation with artists from Australia and India. Friday 28 November 2014.

2013: Interviewed for the leading Korean dance journal Dance and People (2013, Vol 8: p.82)

BOOK REVIEWS:

BUCKWALTER, M. (2010) Composing While Dancing: An Improviser’s Companion, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin. Review published in Dance Research Journal (2013) 31(2): pp.216 – 217.

BUTCHER, R. and MELROSE, S (eds) (2005) Rosemary Butcher: Choreography, Collisions and Collaborations. Middlesex, Middlesex University Press. Review published in Research in Dance Education, (2008) 9(1), pp 107-109.

GERE, D and COOPER ALBRIGHT, A. (2003) Taken by Surprise: A Dance Improvisation Reader.  Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press.

PEER REVIEWER:

2014: Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices

2012: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy:

2008: Dancelines

Bibliometrics

Cited in:

BURT, R. (2009).  History, memory, and the virtual in current European dance practice, Dance Chronicle, 32:1–26.

BROCKBANK, A. and McGILL, I. (2007). Facilitating reflective learning in Higher Education, 2nd ed. Berkshire, The Society for Research in Higher Education and Open University Press, pp128.

DE SPAIN, K. (2014) Topography of movement improvisation, Oxford University Press.

TEMBRIOTI, L. and TSANGARIDOU, N. (2014) Reflective practice in dance: a review of the literature. Research in Dance Education. 15(1): pp4-22.

 

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Sally Doughty performing I Think Not.
Photo credit: Hana Vojáčková

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Renaissance, performed by Sally Doughty and Pete Shenton.
Photo credit: Jason Seniorsally-doughty-img-02Renaissance, performed by Sally Doughty and Pete Shenton.
Photo credit: Jason Senior

 
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