Ms Marie Hay

Job: Senior Lecturer in Dance

Faculty: Arts, Design and Humanities

School/department: School of Visual and Performing Arts

Research group(s): Performance Research Group: Dance

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 250 6185

E: mhay@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/arts

 

Personal profile

Marie has worked at De Montfort University since 2005 when she joined the Centre for Excellence in Performance Arts as a teaching fellow. Since then, she has led the creation of a new degree programme in performing arts; been published internationally for her research on reflective dance practice; and taught on a range of modules as part of the BA (Hons) Dance programme.

Marie is currently admissions tutor for dance.

 

Publications and outputs 

  • The performance and perception of being: ethos, eidos and pathos.
    The performance and perception of being: ethos, eidos and pathos. Hay, Marie This performative demonstration assumes Heidegger’s stance on Dasein as ‘being-in’ when he discusses issues arising from Dasein conceived of as subject and object in Being and Time. Heidegger proposes that Dasein is always already ‘seen’ in a certain way, which is mostly mis-interpreted, or interpreted in an ontologically inadequate way. The mis-interpretation of Dasein has been particularly noted historically by feminist dance practitioners in the US and UK, such as Jacky Lansley, Emilyn Claid, Yvonne Rainer and Trisha Brown. Their practice and writing highlights the perception, interpretation and definition of female dancers’ ethos as objectified within the limits of their outward appearance (eidos). This has often been theorized in relation to Laura Mulvey’s essay on the male gaze titled ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’ (1975). Through performed relationships between speaking and dancing, the dancer and perceiver identify with each other (pathos) and transcend dualistic categories. First performed as part of a panel titled 'Heidegger’s Question of Being and the Ethos of the Dancer' at the Performance Philosophy Conference: How does performance philosophy act? Ethos, ethics, ethnography (22-25 June 2017) Prague. Further developed and performed for as a CIRID research seminar (October 2017)
  • Things taken as obvious... distort. The speaking dancer and the Question of Being
    Things taken as obvious... distort. The speaking dancer and the Question of Being Hay, Marie; Leach, Martin What do we see when we see a dancer dance? It seems obvious that we see a body moving. But what if the dancer speaks? The animation of the body alone should have told us that we are not only looking at a body. That words are also spoken reinforces the fact that we are looking at a being, a thing-in-animation, and that the pro-duction of movement and word is not reducible to body but is concealed in un-say-ability. How might we say the unsayable being? This speaking dancer, this living combination of speech and gesture, may also be taken as a paradigm for the problem of considering what we see when we see any human being in its process of being. As Heidegger has observed, ‘things taken as obvious […] distort beings’. When we see and hear the dancer we think we perceive a body that is living. But what we really experience is the living itself in its essence of animation: the human being in the process of its being. How does the obvious presence of the body as the means by which words and gesture are expressed distort the essential being of the dancer? Does the body imply a being that is not there? And if so, is this unsayable being still a being? Does body distort being by obscuring soul? Flesh is flesh. Space is space. Time passes. Or so it seems. Here, in this room, we experience a dancer who moves and speaks. What can this tell us about the being of human being? We will explore this question through the format of a performative essay involving movement, speech and intervention. We will attempt to disrupt the obvious in order to expose ways of thinking about the question of being through the paradigm of a dancer that speaks. First performed at conference: Dance Fields: Staking a Claim for Dance Studies in the 21st Century (19-22 April 2017) University of Roehampton. Further developed and performed as part of the Cultural Exchanges Festival (26 February - 2 March 2018) DMU.
  • Being: exhibiting a speaking dancer’s practice
    Being: exhibiting a speaking dancer’s practice Hay, Marie Through the installation of film and live work, Marie demonstrates the emergence of an improvised speaking, dance practice as part of her PhD research. The performance was programmed as part of the Cultural Exchanges Festival in Leicester as a double bill with Keira Martin's solo Here Come Trouble. The performance event was followed by a CIRID research seminar on dance, speech and autobiography.
  • What’s all this talking about? Once it’s said, they’ll be nothing left
    What’s all this talking about? Once it’s said, they’ll be nothing left Hay, Marie This proposal is for a 10 minute performed, position statement and additional written paper in response to the conference sub-theme of ‘dance and movement: the physical and verbal body’. The provocation derives from a practice-as-research PhD engaged with philosophical considerations of Voice and Being and an examination of how speech impacts the performance and perception of female contemporary dancers’ identities. Therefore, this provocation will be presented through a collage of talking-moving improvisations that have emerged through research in the area of contemporary dance and speech in live performance. Anticipated discussion topics relate to the dialogue between speech and movement; the physicality of the speech act; and the talking-moving practice as a performance of self and a challenge to fixed identities. The research was founded through the recognition of speech in current contemporary dance performance as commonplace in contrast to a history of the dancer as a muted object. However, the inclusion of speech in contemporary dance work is usually set against a training that lacks experimentation with voice, speech and text. Therefore, this research creatively explores the potential for speech to influence the reception of female dancer identity through an integrated performance practice. The following questions have emerged through the research and will be presented for discussion: 1. What am I willing and able to say about myself in live dance performance? 2. What can speaking in live dance performance allow/achieve that movement alone cannot? The practice is currently in development with a variety of audiences who inform the content and performer-receiver relationship in each iteration. The performance provocation and separate, precursor paper were part of the performer training working group at the TaPRA 2016 conference. The theme for the working group was speech and text in performer training.
  • Designing assessment for autonomous learning
    Designing assessment for autonomous learning Hay, Marie; Mathers, L.
  • Interpreting embodied dance practice
    Interpreting embodied dance practice Hay, Marie
  • Changing positions: dance and the FE-HE transition in the UK
    Changing positions: dance and the FE-HE transition in the UK Hay, Marie
  • Assessment and feedback: aligning dance practice with pedagogic research
    Assessment and feedback: aligning dance practice with pedagogic research Hay, Marie
  • Assessment for reflective learning in the creative arts
    Assessment for reflective learning in the creative arts Hay, Marie

 

Click here for a full listing of Marie Hay's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

 

Research interests/expertise

I am currently undertaking PhD research under the working title: 'The practice and perception of the speaking female contempoary dancer'. Through
an iterative and cyclical research process, I will work between studio-based
work, live performance, documentation, reading and writing to explore the
impact(s) of speech in performance for the female contemporary dancer.

I have been using speech and autobiography in my choreographic work since the completion of my MA to explore a dancer's, particularly a female dancer's, being in live performance. In doing so the intention has been to challenge fixed identities, but this approach also changes the nature of the dance performance - to one where performer and spectator roles blur. The demands on the dancer are also of concern, as speaking is not usually integrated in to the dancer's training.

Areas of teaching

On the undergraduate programme, Marie contributes to modules that include dance technique, current dance practices, dance history, performance and independent research.

Qualifications

BA (Hons) Contemporary Dance, De Montfort University (first class)

MA Dance, De Montfort University

PGCertHE, De Montfort University      

Honours and awards

DMU Teacher Fellow (August 2011) 

 

Membership of professional associations and societies

Higher Education Academy Fellow (2006 – present)

 

Conference attendance

Conference papers:

HAY, M. (2015) The performance of being: the emerging practice and perception of a speaking female contemporary dancer at the Boundaries: Transgression, Authority,
Performance conference, De Montfort University, 22 June 2015.

HAY, M. (2011) Designing assessment for autonomous learning at the Democratic learning conversations conference, De Montfort University, 16 December 2011. Research funded by the Centre for Excellence in Performance Arts and a Research in Teaching Award. 

HAY, M. (2011) Interpreting embodied dance practice at the Dance and Somatic Practices conference, Coventry University, 8-10 July 2011.  Research funded by the Centre for Excellence in Performance Arts and a Research in Teaching Award. Conference attendance funded by faculty research committee.

HAY, M. & MATHERS, L. (2011) Designing assessment for autonomous learning at the Assessment in Higher Education Conference. University of Cumbria, 6 July 2011. Research funded by a Research in Teaching Award. Conference attendance funded by faculty research committee.

HAY, M. (2009) Assessment and feedback: aligning dance practice with pedagogic research. In: Global Perspectives On Dance Pedagogy: Research And Practice.  De Montfort University, Leicester, UK 25-27 June 2009.  Illinois, University of Illinois Press, pp. 92-97.  Research funded by the Centre for Excellence in Performance Arts. 

HAY, M. (2009) Assessment and feedback for autonomous learning in dance practice at the Eighth CLTR Learning & Teaching Research Conference, Edge Hill University, 3 June 2009.  Research funded by the Centre for Excellence in Performance Arts and a Research in Teaching Award. 

HAY, M. (2008) Assessment for reflective learning in the creative arts, at 15th International Conference on Learning, University of Illinois, Chicago. June 2008. Research funded by the Centre for Excellence in Performance Arts. 

Key research outputs

HAY, M. & MATHERS, L. (2012) ‘Designing assessment for autonomous learning’, Practitioner Research in Higher Education. 6 (12) pp. 95-106.

HAY, M. (2012) ‘Interpreting embodied dance practice’, The Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices. 3 (1-2) pp. 201-214.

HAY, M. (2010) Changing positions: dance and the FE-HE transition in the UK. PALATINE, Lancaster.

HAY, M. (2009) Assessment and feedback: aligning dance practice with pedagogic research. In: Global Perspectives On Dance Pedagogy: Research And Practice. De Montfort University, Leicester, UK 25-27 June 2009. Illinois, University of Illinois Press, pp. 92-97.

HAY, M. (2008) ‘Assessment for reflective learning in the creative arts’, The international journal of learning. 15 (7) pp. 131-138.

Consultancy work

Consultant for Babington College (2012-13) advising on strategies to improve students performance through feedback and peer mentoring.

Assessor for BBC performing arts fund (2011)

 

Externally funded research grants information

HAY, M. (2010) Changing positions: dance and the FE-HE transition in the UK. PALATINE, Lancaster.

Changing Positions was initiated by SCODHE (Standing Conference on Dance in Higher Education) in conjunction with PALATINE, and funded by a PALATINE Development Award.

Internally funded research project information

Autonomous learning and emotional intelligence, funded by a DMU Teacher Fellow grant. January 2012 – July 2012

Autonomous learning in the creative disciplines: the transition into and through HE, funded through a Research in Teaching Award in collaboration with Lucy Mathers in Media Technology. February 2008 - July 2009

Professional esteem indicators

Reviewer - Assessment in Higher Education Conference (2013)

Reviewer - International Journal of learning (2008)

 

 

Marie Hay

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