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Reproduction Research

           Reproduction Research

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a multi-disciplinary group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

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Reproduction Research

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a multi-disciplinary group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

 

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Reproduction Research

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a multi-disciplinary group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

 

image-02-bnr
 Reproduction Research

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a multi-disciplinary group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

 

TestTubeBanner
 Reproduction Research

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a multi-disciplinary group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

 

image-04-bnr
Reproduction Research

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a multi-disciplinary group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

 

image-05-bnr

Reproduction Research Group

The Reproduction Research Group at De Montfort University is a vibrant, multi-disciplinary research group based in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences. The group has representation from sociology, anthropology, psychology, nursing and midwifery and health policy.

What makes our group unique and exciting is the diverse character of our membership and our interdisciplinary approach to researching current issues in human reproduction.  

Our research focuses on the social study of on a number of cutting-edge themes:

  • Cross-border reproductive travel
  • Surrogacy
  • Egg and mitochondrial donation
  • Egg freezing
  • Age and reproductive timing
  • Genetic disorders and reproductive technologies
  • Health, pregnancy and childbirth
  • Men, infertilities, technologies and fatherhood
  • Socio-psychological aspects of endometriosis
  • Gay and lesbian parenthood
  • Ethnicity, religion and assisted conception
  • Midwifery and the management of labour

Research funding sources include the Economic and Social Research Council, National Institute for Health Research, Foundation for Sociology of Health and Illness and the charitable sector.

We meet every two weeks for seminars, reading groups and business meetings. To find out more about our meetings contact Reproduction Research Group lead Dr Nicky Hudson

 

Our Work

Most projects have a strong applied focus, designed to impact policy, service delivery and quality of carein reproductive health and the education of healthcare professionals. Many of these projects involve representatives from practice, policy and patient and user organisations.

The Reproduction Research Group has links and works collaboratively with several other academic research groups and centres nationally and internationally. We also collaborate with colleagues across De Montfort University including the Health Policy Research UnitNursing and Midwifery Research Centre and the Mary Seacole Research Centre.

The group also offers consultancy services in the field of reproduction. Read more about our consultancy work here.

 

Contact

The Reproduction Research Group

E: rrg@dmu.ac.uk

  News

Upcoming Events

Reproduction Research Group Seminar

The Reproduction Research Group, De Montfort University, is delighted to invite yopu to our our second seminar of the 2016-17 seminar series.

Wednesday 25th January 2017, 12 – 1.30, Room 1.27 Edith Murphy House, De Montfort University.

Dr Julie Roberts, University of Nottingham, will be presenting on:

Resisting the medicalisation of prolonged pregnancy: women’s experiences 

Abstract

 Being ‘overdue’ is a relatively common experience for pregnant women. Over 20% of births in England take place at 41 weeks gestation or more. NICE guidance recommends that induction of labour is offered to women between 41 and 42 weeks gestation, the alternative being expectant management. Induction is associated with reduced risk of perinatal death but the risks remain small and the induction process also carries risks. This paper explores the accounts of women who questioned, delayed or declined induction of labour for post-dates pregnancy. Drawing on interviews and an online focus group, we find that concerns about a ‘looming’ deadline begin before 40 weeks. Women who resisted the medicalisation of ‘prolonged’ pregnancy, and declined interventions came under intense pressure and scrutiny. Questions and advice from friends, family and even strangers, sometimes reached levels that were unbearable and women isolated themselves by switching off phones and mobile devices. Women found themselves in conflict with midwives and obstetricians. It was difficult to access balanced information to make informed choices. The findings are discussed in relation to the literature about the medicalisation of birth, and structural constraints on women’s choices in pregnancy.   

As places are limited, please email rrg@dmu.ac.uk if you wish to attend to secure your place.

 

Blog Post

Dr Kylie Baldwin recently wrote a blog post discussing some findings from her doctoral research on social egg freezing for the website 'Eggsperience', which has been set up to help inspire, teach, educate women about oocyte cryopreservation. In this blog piece Kylie sheds some much needed light on women’s use of this new form of fertility preservation.

For the full article, please click here.

 
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