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Software Engineering BSc (Hons)

Combine your analytical skills with creativity and study a blend of established theories and modern design techniques to become proficient in developing high quality software. Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, this course prepares you to graduate as an industry-ready software engineer.
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Overview

As a Software Engineering student at DMU, you will develop the technical skills needed to design and build software that is used in everyday devices and systems across our homes, workplaces and communities.

More than 50 years of teaching experience, research expertise and industry practice will inform your learning.

You will gain knowledge of professional practice and social responsibility by learning about software development, database design, computer security and web technologies. The diverse range of modules you will study include  Concurrent and Parallel Algorithms, Web Application Development, and Data Mining and Telematics.

Taking part in industry-focused scenarios, such as the second-year Agile Team Development module  where students engage in a workplace simulation based on agile software development, will enhance your employability.

Software Engineering BSc is closely aligned with  Computer Science BSc at DMU. This shared focus means you have the flexibility to transfer between courses depending on your interests and what you want to specialise in.

Key features

  • This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional.
  • Tailor your learning to your career ambitions by choosing from a wide range of optional final-year modules, including: Functional Software Development, Data Mining, and Front-end Web Development.
  • Join our thriving student societies to build on what you learn on the course and to develop your interests and skills outside of teaching time. They include the Games Society, Robotics Club and Google’s Developer Student Club.
  • Benefit from an international experience with our DMU Global programme. Software Engineering students have networked at software companies in Berlin and met tech entrepreneurs in San Francisco.
  • Prepare for a career in the thriving software industry. Our graduates have gone on to work for companies such as LHA ASRA Group, Lorien, MISCO, Oracle, Royal Bank of Scotland and Sainsbury’s.
  • Computer Science and Informatics at DMU is ranked third among modern UK universities for the quality of its research in the latest Research Excellence Framework evaluation.

BCS

News stories/case studies

Our students benefitted from companies such as Rolls-Royce and Transport for London hosting a workshop on campus to encourage more engineers from diverse backgrounds into the profession. Industry experts shared top tips, personal guidance on writing winning CVs and interview advice.

Dan O’Kelly was offered an associate software engineer role with Sainsbury’s after making an impression at DMU’s annual networking event, which introduces talented graduates to high-profile employers.

 

More courses like this:

Computer Science BSc (Hons)

Cyber Security BSc (Hons)

Foundation Year in Computing

Intelligent Systems BSc (Hons)

  • UK/EU
  • International

Key facts for UK/EU students

Institution code: D26

UCAS course code: G600

Duration: Three years full-time, four years with placement

Fees and funding: 

2021/22 tuition fees for UK students: £9,250

2021/22 tuition fees for EU students: £9,250
See important information about EU fees

 

Find out more about tuition fees and available funding.

Find out about additional costs and optional extras.

Contact us: For more information complete our online enquiry form or call us on +44 (0)116 2 50 60 70.

Key facts for international students

Institution code: D26

UCAS course code: G600

Duration: Three years full-time, four years with placement

Fees and funding: For 2021/22 tuition fees will be £14,750

Find out more about course fees and available funding.

Find out about additional costs and optional extras

Contact us: For more information complete our online enquiry form or call us on +44 (0)116 2 50 60 70.

Entry criteria

  • Five GCSEs at grade C or above, including English and Mathematics or equivalent, plus one of the following:
  • Normally 112 UCAS points from at least two A-levels or equivalent or
  • BTEC National Diploma/ Extended Diploma at DMM or
  • Pass in the QAA accredited Access to HE. English and MathematicsGCSE required as a separate qualification as equivalency is not accepted within the Access qualification. We will normally require students to have had a break from full-time education before undertaking the Access course or
  • International Baccalaureate: 26+ points
  • Foundation Year in Computing: Pass Foundation, and progression is at the discretion of the programme leader. Refer to the Foundation team for further guidance.

Portfolio Required : No

Interview Required: No

We welcome applications from mature students with non-standard qualifications and recognise all other equivalent and international qualifications

English language

If English is not your first language then an IELTS score of 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in each component (or equivalent) is essential.

English Language tuition, delivered by our British Council accredited Centre for English Language Learning, is available both before and throughout the course if you need it.

 

UCAS Tariff changes

Students applying for courses starting in September will be made offers based on the latest UCAS Tariff. Find out more.

 

Structure and assessment

 

Course modules

Teaching and assessments

Accreditation 

 

 

First year

  • Computer Programming I – This module introduces the skills required to develop a computer program to solve a given problem and does so from the perspective of designing trustworthy software with an emphasis on sound coding principles.
  • Computer Programming II – Computer programming requires the analysis of a problem, the production of requirements, and their translation into a design that can be executed on a computer. The design phase in particular requires the identification and combination of appropriate programming abstractions. This module introduces the skills required to analyse a problem to produce a program specification, and to be able to test solutions to ensure they are trustworthy.
  • Computer Ethics – The module introduces students to the ethical theories affecting cyber security, software engineering, computer science and digital forensics. It requires them to develop critical analytical skills in applying ethical theories to technological outcomes regarding cyber security, software engineering, computer science and digital forensics.
  • Computer Law and Cyber Security – The module introduces students to the legal and professional context of cyber security, software engineering, computer science and digital forensics, it addresses legal framework, legal and professional responsibilities of the software engineer, systems manager, computer forensic and security practitioner. The module will address computer ethics, data protection law, UK and international law affecting cyber security, digital engineering, systems management and digital forensics
  • Computer Systems – This module provides a foundation in computer architecture and operating systems with a specific emphasis on their security. Students will learn about computer hardware, software, operating systems, and demonstrate practical knowledge of these during lab sessions. Studying this module student will be able to relate the abstract concepts of logic and number systems to their concrete representation on real machines and identify the security risks in common configurations of computer operating systems and suggest appropriate mitigations. In the practical lab sessions students will also learn to develop shell scripts.
  • Computer Networks – This module provides a foundation in modern computer networks with a specific emphasis on their security. Students studying this module will be able to explain how modern computer networks functions and be able to demonstrate a practical knowledge of computer networking. Students will be able to identify security risks in common configurations of computer networks and suggest appropriate mitigations.
  • Mathematics for Computing – Mathematical structures are introduced that provide a basis for computer science. Specific topics include logic, set theory, probability and statistics.
  • Database Design and Implementation – Structured data, held in relational databases, accessed via SQL, supports the information storage requirements of many companies, organisations, and on-line businesses. In this module the student will learn the fundamentals of how to design the structure of data within a relational database, how to interact with data within the database, and how to protect the data within the database.

 

Second year modules:

  • Software and Security Management – This module introduces the business contexts within which IT projects are procured and developed. This includes the feasibility of computer system development viewed from economic, technical, social, legal, and ethical perspectives. The module covers risk factors and risk assessment during different phases of the lifecycle, and introduces students to the techniques used both to measure and to ensure software quality including processes covering the management and design of trustworthy software (BS PAS744 Software Trustworthiness). 
  • Object Oriented Design – This module focuses on Object-Oriented (OO) library development and enables students to design, implement, and test medium scale software systems using an object-oriented approach. The design notation used is the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and the implementation language is Java. It is essentially a programming module, with the emphasis on implementing OO designs and producing reusable libraries.

  • Object Oriented Development – This module focuses on Object-Oriented (OO) application development using the extensive library packages provided by the Java Software Development Kit (SDK). Students enrolling on this module will have already been introduced to key principles of OO class design such as encapsulation and different associations including inheritance. This knowledge will be useful in helping to navigate and make use of a variety of domains within the standard edition API, e.g. Collections, Input/Output, and Graphical User Interfaces.

  • Web Application Development – This module provides a firm technical foundation of how a web application can be developed that allows web users to interact with assets stored in databases.
    Modern web applications typically make heavy use of server-side scripting . A server-side scripting language that has achieved prominence over recent years has been PHP. This pragmatic language is used to great effect by some web developers and with catastrophic naivety by others. Rudimentary web application penetration testing will introduced in order to emphasise the hostile attention that public facing web content will attract. It is assumed that students are already competent programmers, prior to starting this module.
  • Agile Team Development – This module is an opportunity for students to engage in a constrained work-place simulation based on agile software development. Students working in teams of 3 to 5 will initially identify a system of sufficient size to be distributed equally among all members. Work allocation will be monitored under the guidance of their tutor/supervisor. For example each team member might take individual ownership of the development of 2-3 classes from initial inception to completion providing CRUD functionality. In the case of a large system this may mean that some aspects of the system are never built to completion.
  • Data Structures and Algorithms – This module introduces a variety of data structures and algorithms for sequential execution. Classical data structures will be introduced (including stacks, queues, lists, trees, and hash tables) and algorithms for searching and sorting. The performance characteristics of these data structures and algorithms will be explained. Specific coding issues will also be considered such as modularity, genericity, equality, assignment, mutable and immutable objects.
  • Concurrent and Parallel Algorithms – The module will introduce students to concurrent program design in the context of multi-core architectures and distributed applications. Where appropriate formal notation will be used for specification.
  • Introduction to Research – The module provides the student with an understanding of the importance of researching, analysing, and interpreting existing literature and other documents in order to establish a solid context in which research and development questions can be developed and subsequently investigated. It develops the student's research skills, and particularly skills related to identifying relevant literature from a variety of sources, critically analysing academic and non-academic texts, and justifying a set of research or development questions in a particular topic area. The module explores these research methods through the lens of ethics in technology, introducing students to key ethical issues in relation to information systems, such as privacy, autonomy, security, identity, and social impact.

 

Third year modules:

  • Computing Project – The project provides students with the opportunity to carry out a significant piece of work involving critical analysis and reflection to provide an effective solution to a given technical and/or research-based problem. It enables students to apply and integrate previous material covered on the student's course as well as to extend the work covered on the course through research and self-learning. Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate and proactive project management, and written/verbal presentation skills throughout the period of the project. As well as analysing, designing, delivering and appraising a product of suitable quality, they will be expected to undertake, research, analyse, design, evaluate and report on some aspects of a subject explicitly allied to the project.
  • Systems Building: Methods – This module covers an important aspect of Information Systems Development (ISD): the selection and evaluation of methodologies used in the Systems Development process.

  • Rigorous Systems – This module introduces the role of formal systems in rigorous software development and develops base-level skills using a contemporary formal method. The module covers the essential theoretical material (rationale, syntax, semantics) and provides practical experience using an appropriate software development tool.
    The module is based on the formal specification language ITL.

 

Optional modules:

  • Fuzzy Logic and Knowledge Based Systems
  • Secure Web Application Development
  • Web Application Penetration Testing
  • Multi-service Networks I
  • Multi-service Networks II
  • Functional Software Development
  • Front-End Web Development
  • Interaction Design
  • Database Management and Programming
  • Information Technology Services Practice
  • Computer Ethics and Privacy
  • Data Mining
  • Big Data and Business Models

During the course you will benefit from learning informed by research. Our leading research Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility provides the basis for the ethical computing content of the course, ensuring that your learning is at the cutting edge of recent developments.

Our Software Technology Research Laboratory provides material for the final year module on rigorous systems and has helped to develop the second year concurrent and distributed systems topics. The Cyber Security Centre (CSC) has developed computer security material for the course content that is relevant to practice. 

 

In the first year, you will normally attend around 12-14 hours of timetabled taught sessions each week, split across a variety of lectures, small group activities and practical laboratory work.

There are a variety of assessment methods, typically including short tests, practical software development tasks, written work, and presentations. Your written and academic reading skills will be developed in the ethics and law topics and you will develop a portfolio that will give you experience of practical development.

In the second year, the emphasis moves towards more substantive practical assignments and you will practise modern software development techniques. Research and presentation skills are also important in the second year.

In the final year, the individual software development project forms a major part of the practical assessment.

 

BCS

This course is accredited by the BCS - The Chartered Institute for IT. 

Once you have graduated and begun to work as an IT professional you can apply to become a full member of the BCS and, as your career develops, gain the status of Chartered IT Professional (CITP), giving you a recognised industry-relevant qualification.

Facilities and features

Computer Science Laboratories

Our laboratories are equipped with 100 computer workstations including HP PCs running Windows/Linux.

All the machines are connected to a dedicated high-performance file server so students can store and back up their work. Many of the software packages provided are open source, which means students can download and run the software they need for their coursework while at home.

The laboratories also include study spaces where you can work individually or in groups. Software Engineering  students are timetabled to use this space for their formal classes and are encouraged to use these facilities when they are available at other times.

Library and learning zones

On campus, the main Kimberlin Library offers a space where you can work, study and access a vast range of print materials, with computer stations, laptops, plasma screens and assistive technology also available. 

As well as providing a physical space in which to work, we offer online tools to support your studies, and our extensive online collection of resources accessible from our Library website, e-books, specialised databases and electronic journals and films which can be remotely accessed from anywhere you choose. 

We will support you to confidently use a huge range of learning technologies, including Blackboard, Collaborate Ultra, DMU Replay, MS Teams, Turnitin and more. Alongside this, you can access LinkedIn Learning and learn how to use Microsoft 365, and study support software such as mind mapping and note-taking through our new Digital Student Skills Hub. 

The library staff offer additional support to students, including help with academic writing, research strategies, literature searching, reference management and assistive technology. There is also a ‘Just Ask’ service for help and advice, live LibChat, online workshops, tutorials and drop-ins available from our Learning Services, and weekly library live chat sessions that give you the chance to ask the library teams for help.

More flexible ways to learn

We offer an equitable and inclusive approach to learning and teaching for all our students. Known as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL), our teaching approach has been recognised as sector leading. UDL means we offer a wide variety of support, facilities and technology to all students, including those with disabilities and specific learning differences.

Just one of the ways we do this is by using ‘DMU Replay’ – a technology providing all students with anytime access to audio and/or visual material of lectures. This means students can revise taught material in a way that suits them best, whether it's replaying a recording of a class or adapting written material shared in class using specialist software.

Opportunities and careers

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Graduate Careers

Our graduates are working as business intelligence analysts, international business analysts, software application developers and software engineers for companies such as Lorien, MISCO, Oracle, Royal Bank of Scotland and Sainsbury’s.

Graduates are also well positioned to continue their academic careers by embarking on postgraduate study in either research or taught areas, which offers the opportunity to further specialise and enhance existing skills.

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DMU Global

Our innovative international experience programme DMU Global aims to enrich your studies and expand your cultural horizons, helping you to become a global graduate, equipped to meet the needs of employers across the world.

Through DMU Global, we offer a wide range of opportunities including on-campus and UK-based activities, overseas study, internships, faculty-led field trips and volunteering, as well as Erasmus+ and international exchanges.

While overseas DMU Global opportunities are not currently possible, DMU will continue to review government advice and if travel is permitted, we hope to offer a small number of extra-curricular opportunities in the summer of 2021. 

 

Software Engineering students have  had the chance to network with Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, explore science and technology museums in Berlin, and test their skills at Spyscape in New York.  They have also attended the SAS Global Forum in Washington DC and visited  Telefonica in Madrid.

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Placements

During this course you will have the option to complete a paid placement year, an invaluable opportunity to put the skills developed during your degree into practice. This insight into the professional world will build on your knowledge in a real-world setting, preparing you to progress onto your chosen career.

Our careers programme DMU Works can help to hone your professional skills with mock interviews and practice aptitude tests, and an assigned personal tutor will support you throughout your placement. 

Previous Software Engineering students have completed placements at a number of local and national companies, including Arm Ltd, Gigaclear, IBM, Netready, Next and SAP.

DMU Open days

The next DMU Open Day will take place on Saturday 13 February

Book now

Order a prospectus

Our prospectus will give you a clearer idea of what it's like to live and study at DMU and a snapshot of the courses we offer.

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How to apply

We welcome applications from students with a wide range of qualifications and experience.

Find out more

More about your DMU

Case study
Accommodation
De Montfort Students' Union
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Case study

Completing a placement with multinational software company SAP gave Arpith Shetty the skills he needed to thrive in his final year of Software Engineering at DMU and beyond. 

He said: “The placement has given me a better understanding of how a professional environment works and has helped me to perfect my technical skills. Most of the work I’ve done has been relevant to my course, but nothing compares to getting hands-on experience like this.”

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Accommodation

We offer a range of high-standard accommodation for our students, with 13 halls of residence and around 4,100 rooms, all of which are a short distance from our campus. There is a choice of mixed or same-gender flats, shared kitchen and laundry facilities, furnished bedrooms (some with en suite facilities) and internet access. Find out more.

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De Montfort Students' Union  

Run by students for students, DSU offers more than 150 societies and almost 40 different sports clubs. You can also get involved in the award-winning Demon Media group, volunteer to help in the community, become a course or faculty rep, and take part in DSU’s annual elections. Find out more.

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A city like no other

Studying here gives easy access to the vibrant hub of entertainment, shopping and culture that is Leicester. There are clubs, bars and pubs, as well as festivals, live music, theatres and cinemas. Leicester City Football Club play in the Premier League while Leicester Tigers are one of Europe’s biggest rugby clubs. Find out more.