Dr Neil Brown

Job: Senior Lecturer

Faculty: Technology

School/department: School of Engineering and Sustainable Development

Research group(s): Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development (IESD)

Address: IESD, Queens Building, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH UK

T: +44 (0)116 257 7851

E: nbrown@dmu.ac.uk

W: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/research/centres-institutes/iesd/index.aspx

Social Media:

 

Research group affiliations

Business and Law, Leicester De Montfort Law School, Light Pollution

Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development

Publications and outputs 

  • Potential Economic Benefits of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Reduction Due to Renewable Energy and Electrolytic Hydrogen Fuel deployment under current and Long Term Forecasting of the Social Carbon Cost (SCC)
    Potential Economic Benefits of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Reduction Due to Renewable Energy and Electrolytic Hydrogen Fuel deployment under current and Long Term Forecasting of the Social Carbon Cost (SCC) Rahil, Abdullah; Gammon, Rupert; Brown, Neil; Udie, Justin; Akram, Muhammad Usman; Khattak, Sanober The 2016 Paris Agreement (UNFCCC Authors, 2015) is the latest of initiative to create an international consensus on action to reduce GHG emissions. However, the challenge of meeting its targets lies mainly in the intimate relationship between GHG emissions and energy production, which in turn links to industry and economic growth. The Middle East and North African region (MENA), particularly those nations rich oil and gas (O&G) resources, depend on these as a main income source. Persuading the region to cut down on O&G production or reduce its GHG emissions is hugely challenging, as it is so vital to its economic strength. In this paper, an alternative option is established by creating an economic link between GHG emissions, measured as their CO2 equivalent (CO2e), and the earning of profits through the concept of Social Carbon Cost (SCC). The case study is a small coastal city in Libya where 6% of electricity is assumed to be generated from renewable sources. At times when renewable energy (RE) output exceeds the demand for power, the surplus is used for powering the production of hydrogen by electrolysis, thus storing the energy and creating an emission-free fuel. Two scenarios are tested based on short and long term SCCs. In the short term scenario, the amount of fossil fuel energy saved matches the renewable energy produced, which equates to the same amount of curtailed O&G production. The O&G-producing region can earn profits in two ways: (1) by cutting down CO2 emissions as a result of a reduction in O&G production and (2) by replacing an amount of fossil fuel with electrolytically-produced hydrogen which creates no CO2 emissions. In the short term scenario, the value of SCC saved is nearly 39% and in the long term scenario, this rose to 83%. open access article
  • Exergy analysis of a four pan jaggery making process
    Exergy analysis of a four pan jaggery making process Khattak, S.; Sardeshpande, V.; Brown, Neil; Greenough, R. M. Jaggery is a non-traditional sweetener that is produced from boiling sugarcane juice. Due to the energy intensive nature of the combustion process in jaggery making, previous studies in literature have presented various process and equipment modifications to affect its energy efficiency. This study adds to the understanding of the resource transformations and consumptions in the jaggery process by presenting its exergy analysis. The baseline process was operationally modified for which the exergy efficiency and exergy destruction are calculated. Through the modifications, the exergy efficiency and exergy destruction increased by 11.2% and 0.8% respectively. A significant amount of exergy was wasted as surplus heat in the form of flue gas, which reduced by 11.5% due to process modifications. The results show that while the most evident form of resource waste was due to flue gas released into the environment, the largest form of resource consumption was actually due to exergy destruction arising from irreversibilities in combustion, a result not clearly evident through energy analysis alone. Through modelling process flows in terms of exergy, the analysis presented in this paper increases the visibility of the resource consumptions and losses in the jaggery making process. This study should aid the efforts of researchers and practitioners aiming to reduce resource consumption in the jaggery making process. open access article
  • Flexible operation of electrolyser at the garage forecourt to support grid balancing and exploitation of hydrogen as a clean fuel
    Flexible operation of electrolyser at the garage forecourt to support grid balancing and exploitation of hydrogen as a clean fuel Rahil, Abdulla; Gammon, Rupert; Brown, Neil Rapid growth in the generation of renewable energy (RE) and its integration with electricity grids has been driven by concerns about both the climate impacts and the depletion of fossil fuels. Moreover, these concerns have prompted the need to develop alternatives to hydrocarbon fuels, leading to the expectation that fuel cell vehicle numbers will similarly increase. However, the variable and intermittent output of RE generators significantly affects the capability for electricity networks to balance supply and demand, although this may be addressed through energy storage and demand-side response (DSR) technologies. One potential DSR technique that can be implemented at industrial scale is water electrolysis, which is used for hydrogen production. When electrolyser operation is modulated, for example, to respond to the variable output of wind and solar power sources, it can be exploited as a dispatchable demand load. Naturally, this would need to be incentivized by electricity tariff structures that reflect the dynamics of RE availability. This paper aims to compare the economics of continuous and dispatchable electrolyser operation for producing affordable hydrogen at garage forecourts in Libya, while ensuring no interruption in the fuel supply to vehicles. Using the coastal city of Derna as a case study, with renewable energy generated by a wind farm, a suitable turbine specification and the number of turbines needed to meet demand was determined through an analysis of wind speeds. The constantly varying difference between RE power supply and electricity demand on the grinded the surplus power at any given time. Using a linear programming algorithm to optimize the hydrogen cost, based on the current price of electricity, this study examines a hydrogen refuelling station in both dispatchable and continuous operation. As the capital cost is already known, the optimisation focuses on the variable cost in order to reduce the price of hydrogen, which means using the cheaper of two electricity tariffs. Three scenarios were considered to evaluate whether the cost of electrolytic hydrogen could be reduced through using lower-cost off-peak electricity supplies: 1- Standard Continuous, in which the electrolyser operates continuously on a standard tariff of $16/kWh. 2- Off-peak Only, in which the electrolyser operates only during off-peak periods at the lower price of $7/kWh. 3- 2-Tier Continuous, in which the electrolyser operates continuously on a low tariff at off-peak times and a high tariff at other times. The results indicate that Scenario 2 produced the cheapest electricity at $3.89 per kg of hydrogen, followed by Scenario 3 at $5.10 per kg, and the most expensive was Scenario 1 at $9.26 per kg. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Dispatchable hydrogen production by multiple electrolysers to provide clean fuel and responsive demand in Libya
    Dispatchable hydrogen production by multiple electrolysers to provide clean fuel and responsive demand in Libya Rahil, Abdulla; Gammon, Rupert; Brown, Neil The use of hydrogen as a fuel carries major environmental advantages because there are a number of ways of producing it by low-carbon methods. When electrolysis is used, additional benefits are obtained by flexible operation that offers the opportunity to reduce the cost of hydrogen production by absorbing electricity during off-peak hours, and stopping operation during peak hours. This can also act as a tool in support of balancing electrical systems. In this research, off-peak electricity is used to produce hydrogen via electrolysis, which is sold as a fuel at six garage forecourts in Darna, a small city on the east coast of Libya. In addition to the six forecourt electrolysers, a centralised electrolyser plant will be included in the system to consume the surplus energy and to satisfy any deficiency in hydrogen production at the forecourt. The capital cost of both forecourt and centralised electrolyser systems, plus fixed costs, were financed by bank loans at a 5% rate of interest over seven years. A MATLAB model with optimisation tools was used to formulate this problem. This research shows that forecourt hydrogen production at off-peak times (and without the centralised electrolyser) can satisfy nearly 53.93% of the fuel demand. This represents 59.82% of the total surplus renewable energy. The average hydrogen sale price at the forecourts is between £10.82-11.71/kg. After adding the centralised electrolyser, nearly 78.83 % of the total surplus power was absorbed and the average hydrogen selling prices were between £15.04-19.80/kg The centralised electrolyser can meet 43%, 49%, 50%, 42%, 57% and 53% of the deficit in consumption for stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Techno-economic assessment of dispatchable hydrogen production by multiple electrolysers in Libya
    Techno-economic assessment of dispatchable hydrogen production by multiple electrolysers in Libya Rahil, Abdulla; Gammon, Rupert; Brown, Neil With the worldwide growth of renewable energy generation, the value of hydrogen production by electrolysis as a demand management tool for electricity networks is likely to increase. Electrolytic hydrogen can be sold as a fuel, chemical feedstock or injected into pipelines to lower the carbon content of natural gas. The main obstacle to hydrogen’s use as a fuel or energy storage method is the price. The highest costs are in the capital expenditure and the consumption of feedstock (electricity and water). In this paper, three major techno-economic aspects of the system are investigated, including technical analyses of both the energy absorbed by the process in the provision of electricity demand management services and in its meeting of fuel demand, plus an economic assessment of the hydrogen price at the at the point of sale. Thus, the study investigates how only off-peak electricity is used to produce hydrogen via onsite electrolysis at a number of garage forecourts. In a simulated case study, six garage forecourts are assumed to be sited in Darnah, a small city on the east coast of Libya. An electricity pricing mechanism is devised to allow the energy producer (utility company) and energy consumer (garage forecourt operator) to make a profit. Short term (2015) and long term (2030) cost scenarios are applied. Matlab software was used to simulate this process. Without any government support or changes in regulation and policy, hydrogen prices were £10.00/kg, £9.80/kg, £9.60/kg, £10.00/kg, £9.40/kg and £10.30/kg for forecourts 1–6 respectively under the 2015 cost scenario. The electricity price represents around 17% of the total hydrogen cost, whereas, due to the investment cost reduction in 2030, the average prices of hydrogen dropped to £6.50/kg, £6.60/kg, £6.30/kg, £6.40/kg, £6.20/kg and £6.50/kg for stations 1–6 respectively. The feedstock cost share became 44% in the 2030 cost scenario. Nearly 53.91% and 53.77% of available energy is absorbed in short and long term scenarios respectively. Under the long term cost scenario, 65% of hydrogen demand can be met, whereas less than 60% of hydrogen demand is met under the short term scenario. The system reliability (i.e. the meeting of hydrogen fuel demand) is quite low due to the operational mode of the system. Increasing the system size (mainly electrolyser production capacity) can clearly improve the system reliability. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link
  • Improved occupancy monitoring in non-domestic buildings
    Improved occupancy monitoring in non-domestic buildings Ekwevugbe, Tobore; Brown, Neil; Pakka, V. H.; Fan, Denis Measuring occupancy can facilitate energy efficiency in non-domestic buildings, when control systems are able to adjust heating and cooling based on demand rather than fixed schedules. The variable “occupancy profile” itself is rarely considered as a control system parameter in building energy management systems (BEMS), and this is largely because reliably measuring occupancy in the past has been too difficult, expensive, or a mixture of both. Occupancy detection is possible using e.g. CO2 sensors, passive infra-red (PIR) detectors, which can provide a basic trigger for services, but the actual occupancy count, and therefore the expected load on building services, requires a step change in instrumentation. Advanced occupancy sensors developed from a heterogeneous multisensory fusion strategy offer this, improving control system performance, e.g. turning off services out of hours, and not over-ventilating, saving energy, while not under-ventilating during occupancy, benefitting comfort and health. While this is the case, there is a shortage of any systematic methodology for developing robust and reliable occupancy monitoring systems from heterogeneous multi-sensory sources. In this paper we describe an innovative sensor fusion approach utilising symmetrical uncertainty (SU) analysis and a genetic based feature selection for building occupancy estimation. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Demonstration of Controllable Electricity Production via Biogas Plants
    Demonstration of Controllable Electricity Production via Biogas Plants Haring, Georg; Sonnleitner, Matthias; Bär, Katharina; Brown, Neil; Zörner, Wilfred With the expansion of renewable, but fluctuating power generation from wind and solar energy, the demand placed on the security and reliability of supply is increasing. To ensure grid stability in the future, controllable power production via biogas plants has great technical and economic potential. In order to demonstrate the operation of controllable electricity production, an existing industrial-scale biogas plant was modified to produce electricity in accordance to the demands of the electricity market. In the course of scientific monitoring, extensive instrumentation was installed at the demonstration plant, which allows detailed evaluation of the operation of the limited gas storage volume and the behavior of the combined heat and power units (CHPs) during flexible operation. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Data gathering and architecture aspects of a major EU wide energy efficiency project for SMEs
    Data gathering and architecture aspects of a major EU wide energy efficiency project for SMEs Brown, Neil; Fleming, P. D.; Favaretto, Nicoletta; Snadford, Niall “Support and Training for an Excellent Energy Efficiency Performance” is a 3-year European project helping over 600 European cross-sector small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to reduce their energy use and become more energy-efficient. Companies participating in STEEEP benefit from tailored training and guidance on effective energy management tools and best practices provided by an established network of energy advisors from Chambers of Commerce and Industry (CCIs) in 10 different countries. SMEs in many EU countries employ over 90% of the workforce, so improving the energy efficiency of EU SMEs is therefore compelling, with clear advantages for the European economy. Energy efficiency in SMEs previously received less attention than in larger companies, the public sector and dwellings. Previously, policymakers had little energy (and related) data for SMEs, making prioritising ways to support energy conservation difficult. In addition staffing resources and knowledge levels within SMEs frequently determine the level of commitment to energy efficiency and implementing EU energy and climate policy, with a dedicated or even part time energy manager for many SMEs a rarity. The STEEEP project aims to help this by introducing training to SMEs via CCIs, and monitoring savings and providing feedback to SMEs. Crucial to this is the benchmarking of energy use: Basic data about the SMEs, the SME’s energy consumption, and information about the SME policies and procedures relating to energy were gathered form each of the over 600 participants. Managing these data is a considerable task, notably in several languages, using combinations of numeric, free text and other data, gathered through questionnaires. It is not merely fiscal metering data, and supporting information that are gathered, we ask for from occupancy, to building types, and to complete the energy management matrix. We describe how this is done; the data processing . survey design, initial data gathering, benchmarking, and database architecture. Energy use is gathered as the project progresses , with interventions and changes captured. This paper describes the methods used and presents lessons learnt. This include the process of collecting , storing and analyzing the data from over 600 SMEs in 10 different countries. It identifies how barriers were overcome and how information from the data collection is being used by Chambers of Commerce and Industry to help reduce energy use of SMEs
  • An exergy based approach to resource accounting for factories
    An exergy based approach to resource accounting for factories Khattak, Sanober; Greenough, R. M.; Korolija, Ivan; Brown, Neil Resource accounting is widely practiced to identify opportunities for improving the sustainability of industrial systems. This paper presents a conceptual method for resource accounting in factories that is based on the fundamentals of thermodynamics. The approach uses exergy analysis and treats the factory as an integrated energy system comprising a building, its technical building services and manufacturing processes. The method is illustrated with a case study of an automotive cylinder head manufacturing line in which the resource efficiency of this part of the factory is analysed for different energy system options relating to heating ventilation and air conditioning. Firstly, the baseline is compared with the use of a solar photovoltaic array to generate electricity, and then a heat recovery unit is considered. Finally, both of these options are used together, and here it was found that the non-renewable exergy supply and exergy destruction are reduced by 51.6% and 49.2% respectively. Also, it was found that a conventional energy analysis would overestimate the resource savings from reducing the hot water supplied to the heating system, since energy analysis cannot account for energy quality. Since exergy analysis accounts for both energy quality and quantity it produces a different result. The scientific value of this paper is that it presents an exergy-based approach for factory resource accounting, which is illustrated through application to a real factory. The exergy-based approach is shown to be a valuable complement to energy analysis, which could lead to a more resource efficient system design than one based on energy analysis alone.
  • Advanced Occupancy Sensing for Energy Efficiency in Office Buildings
    Advanced Occupancy Sensing for Energy Efficiency in Office Buildings Ekwevugbe, Tobore; Brown, Neil; Pakka, V. H.; Fan, Denis Control systems for Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) in non-domestic buildings often operate to fixed schedules, assuming maximum occupancy during business hours. Since lower occupancies usually mean less demand for HVAC, energy savings could be made. Air quality sensing, often combined with temperature sensing, has performed sufficiently in the past for this if maintained properly, although sensor and control failures may increase energy use by as much as 50%. As energy costs increase, building controls must meet increasingly stringent environmental requirements, increases in building services complexity, and reduced commissioning time, all placing ever higher demands on sensing, with a standing requirement to improve reliability. Sensor fusion offers performance and resilience to meet these demands, while cost and privacy are key factors which are also met. This paper describes a neural network approach to sensor fusion for occupancy estimation. Feature selection was carried out using symmetrical uncertainty analysis, while fusion of sensor features used a back-propagation neural network, with occupant count accuracy exceeding 74%.

 Click here for a full listing of Neil Brown's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

KAP - Knowledge Awareness prediction (EU FP-7 2009-on) (Co-I) Puts energy as a manufacturing process variable.  Production performance indicator definitions, including aspects of sustainability and energy-efficiency.  Complex event processing and data stream analysis compute these indicators on-the-fly to provide real-time monitoring.  Partners include Intel, SAP, Infineon, Volvo, Nissan. http://www.kap-project.eu/

CaRB - EPSRC Grant Reference: GR/S94377/01, 2005-2008 (SRF) Large consortium project aimed at producing a public domain, socio-technical model of energy use in buildings applicable at national, regional, city and community level. http://www.ucl.ac.uk/carb/

DEFRA AFM114 (RF) Laser sealing project 2001-2005, soft tooling for food and medical packaging.  This project was the main follow-on to AFM14 (RA), and produced IP for seven industrial partners. Patent produced. 

DTI/EPSRC Knowledge Based System for Gravure Process Control 1999-2001.  (RF). This project produced IP for three industrial partners, with an estimated scrap / wastage reduction of around 5%.  Close cooperation with Shelton Vision Systems Ltd, who produced 'Webspector', now sold worldwide.

Research interests/expertise

Energy efficiency, renewable energy, appropriate technology, electromechanical design, instrumentation; data design and processing

Areas of teaching

Sustainability, energy efficiency, instrumentation, data analysis, history of energy use, energy modelling, power generation, energy analysis techniques, building plant, heating and cooling, renewables: solar PV, wind power, biofuels.

Qualifications

Loughborough University 

PhD, Modeling and simulation of machining process and electrohydraulic servomechanisms

1995 – 1998

"Modification of the Rotary machining Process to Improve Surface Form". Matlab / Simulink based simulation of mixed technology systems for high speed machining (also Mast/Saber) electrical, mechanical, electronic. Simulation of cutting geometry, test rig construction, image processing, neural network prediction of surface geometry.

University of Leicester

MSc, Modern methods for Electromechanical Design

1994 – 1995

Control theory (robust, multivariable), instrumentation, microprocessors, data processing, composites, analogue signal processing, digital signal processing, software engineering, CFD.

Leicester Polytechnic

BEng (Hons), Engineering Technology (majoring in Mechanical Design)

1988 – 1991

Mechanical and electrical Engineering, electronics, mechanical science, thermodynamics, Engineering Design (draughting, FE, reliability assessment, QA, materials, structures, manufacturing etc)

Courses taught

MSc Energy and Sustainable Building Design, Climate Change and Sustainable Development, Energy and Industrial Sustainability, BEng Green Engineering.

Membership of professional associations and societies

2007 Institute of Measurement and Control - MinstMC

2007 Chartered Engineer, Engineering Council - CEng

Conference attendance

Brown, N., Wright, A.J. Non-Invasive and Cost Effective Monitoring of Energy Consumption Patterns for Electrical Equipment. . in Fourth International Conference Improving Energy Efficiency in Commercial Building (IEECB'08) 2008.

Wright, A.J., Brown, N. The Analysis and interpretation of half hourly utility data in UK buildings. in Fourth International Conference Improving Energy Efficiency in Commercial Building. 2008. Frankfurt.

Painter, B., Brown, N., and Cook, M., Evaluation of sensors for post-occupancy building monitoring. IEECB 2010, 2010.

Brown, N., Image Processing for Overnight Lighting Quantification in Buildings. IEECB 2010, 2010.

Brown N, Some Aspects of a Framework for Energy Data, Improving Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings, Frankfurt, 2012. Abstract accepted.

Invited Plenary lecture at Advanced Meter Data Management Conference,
Plaza Hotel, London, Research and Data Analysis Regarding Large Scale Half-hourly Metering, 2009.

Keynote Speaker at Conference on 2010 E&P Information and Data Management, London, November 2010, aspects of lossy data compression and application of video processing techniques for energy data analysis.

Speaker at 2010 Information Day on the three research Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) : "Factories of the Future", "Energy-Efficient Buildings", and "Green Cars" , European Commission, Brussels. 850 Attendees. 

A Design Model for Building Occupancy Detection Using Sensor Fusion
T Ekwevugbe, N Brown, D Fan
IEEE-DEST-2012 Conference on Digital Ecosystems, Campione d'Italia 2012

Precursors to using Energy Data as a Manufacturing Process Variable
N Brown, R Greenough, K Vikhorev
IEEE-DEST-2012 Conference on Digital Ecosystems, Campione d'Italia

Consultancy work

2009 - 10

Watford Hospital electrical feed analysis - Department of Health electrical feed analysis at ward level (provided advice on instrumentation strategies)

Halfords Ltd - Analysis and recommendation of energy efficient lighting systems

Current research students

 Michael Roberts(2nd) - POE and performance aspects of BSF schools (Began Nov ‘09).

ToboreEkwevugbe (1st) - Instrumentation and data fusion in a Living Lab (began Sept 2010).

Youyuenyong, Pedithep Light Pollution (in Faculty of Business and Law)    Morgan-Taylor, Martin (1st); Brown, Neil (2nd), (began Oct ’10)

Sanober Hassan Khattak (2nd) – KAP Project (began Sept 2011).

Brian Kohler (1st) - Low Carbon Technologies (began Sept 2011).

Externally funded research grants information

KAP  Energy-aware prediction. (Co-Investigator) Knowledge, Awareness and Prediction of Man, Machine, Material and Method in Manufacturing,  EU - KAP Large-scale Integrating Project (IP) ICT call 5 FP7-2010-NMP-ICT-FoF. Project partners include Nissan, Volvo and Intel. EUR 712k (Full project =  eur16M) 36 Months from Aug 2010.

DUALL Deliberative User Approach in a Living Lab (Contributed to the proposal, involved in the project) - Development of an ICT tool to analyse energy consumption patterns of IT equipment to facilitate a zero carbon building.  This is a one year project financed by JISC, my input being the management of the instrumentation design aspect of the project, including knowledge based system theory. (~£150k) 12 Months from Feb 2010. 

Published patents

United States Patent Application No. 11/721663 2008, Method and Apparatus for Verigying Seal Integrity, Brown, Kerr, Parkin, Jackson, Shi

Professional esteem indicators

  • Referee for:
    ImechE, part B (Journal of Engineering manufacture)
    ImechE, part I (Journal of Systems and Control Engineering)
    Mechatronics
    Energy and Buildings (five per year)
    IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics (around three per year).
  • Reviewer for IEECB conference bi-annually in Frankfurt.  
  • Frequent Referee for EPSRC, Less Frequent referee for ESRC
  • Reviewer for Earthscan Publications
  • Leicester City Council - Advice on instrumentation and monitoring, energy efficiency, 2006 to present.

Invited Plenary lecture at Advanced Meter Data Management Conference, 
Plaza Hotel, London, Research and Data Analysis Regarding Large Scale Half-hourly Metering, 20
09.

Keynote Speaker at Conference on 2010 E&P Information and Data Management, London, November 2010, aspects of lossy data compression and application of video processing techniques for energy data analysis.

  • Speaker at 2010 Information Day on the three research Public Private Partnerships (PPPs):
    "Factories of the Future", "Energy-Efficient Buildings", and "Green Cars”,
    European Commission, Brussels. 850 Attendees.
  • British Standards Institution – Advice and cooperation on Energy audits and Energy Data Standards, 2012.
  • External Examiner (PhD), Heriot-Watt University, Energy Consumption in Non-Domestic Buildings based on empirical Data, December 2012.
  • Track chair for 6th IEEE International Conference on Digital Ecosystem Technologies, June 2012, Campione d'Italia, Italy, 2012.
  • Guest lecturer at symposium on nearly zero energy building design, universitatea de arhitectura si urbanism "ion mincu", Bucharest, October 2012.
  • Guest Lecturer in energy efficiency at Furtwangen University, Germany, January 2013.

 

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