Dr Mark Shaw

Job: Senior Research Fellow

Faculty: Technology

School/department: School of Computer Science and Informatics

Research group(s): Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility (CCSR)

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 207 8487

E: research@dmu.ac.uk

W: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/ccsr

 

Publications and outputs 

  • Ethics Management and Responsible Research and Innovation in the Human Brain Project
    Ethics Management and Responsible Research and Innovation in the Human Brain Project Rainey, Stephen; Stahl, Bernd Carsten, 1968-; Shaw, Mark Christopher; Reinsborough, Michael Responsible research and innovation (RRI) is a key concept in current discourses concerning research governance and policy. The practice of Ethics Management in the European Union (EU) Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Flagship Human Brain Project (HBP) utilises a concept of ‘meta-responsibility’ in order to further RRI. This chapter will explain the theory and practice of meta-responsibility to demonstrate RRI in practice in the HBP. As a Flagship EC research project, the HBP represents a particular opportunity to espouse the best aspirations of the European research area. In this chapter, particular focus is given to responsible research and innovation as it is theorised and implemented within the HBP. This article focusses specifically on the role and practice of ethics management in the RRI efforts of the HBP. As such, it presents a truncated and incomplete view. This is unavoidable, given the complex nature of the area – the map is not the territory. Other perspectives are possible, from which other aspects of RRI, and of the HBP overall, might gain or lose emphasis. Nevertheless, here is presented an ethics management perspective on, and role in, RRI so far in the HBP.
  • Managing Ethics in the HBP: A Reflective and Dialogical Approach
    Managing Ethics in the HBP: A Reflective and Dialogical Approach Stahl, Bernd Carsten, 1968-; Rainey, Stephen; Shaw, Mark Christopher
  • The Ethical Implications of Personal Health Monitoring
    The Ethical Implications of Personal Health Monitoring Mittelstadt, Brent; Fairweather, N. Ben, 1966-; Shaw, Mark Christopher; McBride, Neil Personal Health Monitoring (PHM) uses electronic devices which monitor and record health-related data outside a hospital, usually within the home. This paper examines the ethical issues raised by PHM. Eight themes describing the ethical implications of PHM are identified through a review of 68 academic articles concerning PHM. The identified themes include privacy, autonomy, obtrusiveness and visibility, stigma and identity, medicalisation, social isolation, delivery of care, and safety and technological need. The issues around each of these are discussed. The system / lifeworld perspective of Habermas is applied to develop an understanding of the role of PHMs as mediators of communication between the institutional and the domestic environment. Furthermore, links are established between the ethical issues to demonstrate that the ethics of PHM involves a complex network of ethical interactions. The paper extends the discussion of the critical effect PHMs have on the patient’s identity and concludes that a holistic understanding of the ethical issues surrounding PHMs will help both researchers and practitioners in developing effective PHM implementations.1
  • Information security policies in the UK Healthcare Sector: A critical evaluation.
    Information security policies in the UK Healthcare Sector: A critical evaluation. Stahl, Bernd Carsten, 1968-; Doherty, N. F.; Shaw, Mark Christopher Abstract: All organizations must take active steps to maintain the security and integrity of their information resources, and nowhere is this strategy more critical than in hospitals where issues of information accuracy and patient confidentiality are paramount. Of all the tools at the information security manager's disposal, none is more widely valued and used than the information security policy. Much research therefore concentrates on the way in which information security policies contribute to the protection of systems from internal and external threats. Such work is legitimate and important, but it often fails to explore alternative views of security and related policies. Against this backdrop, this paper seeks to provide novel insights into the role and purpose of information security policies by reviewing them through a critical theoretical lens. It presents the results of a critical discourse analysis which looked for evidence of ideology and hegemony within a sample of information security policies from the UK’s National Health Service. The findings support the contention that an alternative description of information security policies from a critical perspective provides better insights into existing problems than most mainstream work. The paper concludes by discussing implications of the findings and future research avenues.
  • On quality and communication: The relevance of critical theory to health informatics.
    On quality and communication: The relevance of critical theory to health informatics. Shaw, Mark Christopher; Stahl, Bernd Carsten, 1968- Health information systems require long-term investment before they provide a socio-economic return, yet their implementation remains problematic, possibly because the claims made about them appear not to sit well with healthcare professionals’ practice. Health informatics should address these issues from a sound conceptual base, such as might be provided by critical theory, which seeks to identify hidden assumptions and ideologies. This discipline can provide a better understanding of the inner workings of socio-technical systems, with a view to improving them through the promotion of emancipation (allowing people to fulfill their potential). Critical theory can also shed light on the problems with health information systems and offer insight into remedies, for example, by relating Habermas’ theories about communication to feedback, a concept central to quality assurance (QA). Such analysis finds that QA’s principal practices can be interpreted as emancipatory but requires organizations to substantially change their behavior. An alternate approach is to install health information systems designed to support QA. Applying critical theory to these systems shows that they could become an active part of service delivery rather than static repositories of data, because they may encourage standardized conversations between all stakeholders about the important features of health care. Success will depend on access for all participants to data entry and analysis tools, integration with work practice, and use by staff and management in QA. These ideas offer new directions for research into and the development of health information systems. The next step will be to implement them and observe their technical and emancipatory properties.
  • A quality assurance approach to healthcare: implications for information systems.
    A quality assurance approach to healthcare: implications for information systems. Shaw, Mark Christopher; Stahl, Bernd Carsten, 1968-

Click here to view a full listing of Mark Shaw's publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Health Informatics.
  • Health care quality assurance.

Qualifications

MBBS, BSc, MFPH.

Courses taught

  • Database design and implementation.
  • Final year programming projects.
  • Placement supervision.

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