Jason Jones

Job: Senior Research Fellow

Faculty: Technology

School/department: School of Engineering and Sustainable Development

Research group(s): Advanced Manufacturing Processes and Mechatronics Centre (AMPMC)

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, United Kingdom

T: +44 (0)116 257 7763

E: jj@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/technology

 

Personal profile

Jason has undertaken research in the field of Additive Manufacturing (AM) since 2005 and was appointed as a Senior Research Fellow in 2007.  Jason is an investigator leading collaborative research projects to develop new layer based manufacturing processes leveraging digital printing & direct writing technology.  He is also serves as a task group chair for ASTM (F2921) developing international standards for AM.

For five years prior to his research appointment, he worked in the CNC & 3D printing industry as Technical Manager for Unimatic Engineers Ltd. in London, England.

Research group affiliations

Advanced Manufacturing Processes and Mechatronics Centre (AMPMC)

Publications and outputs 

  • Laser Printing Circuit Boards and Electronics
    Laser Printing Circuit Boards and Electronics Jones, Jason B.; Büttner, Dustin; Chudasama, Rupesh; Wimpenny, David Ian; Krüger, Klaus Although significant progress has been made toward digital printing of electronics using inkjet technologies, the potential of laser printing for digital fabrication has been largely overlooked. Despite their speed and resolution capabilities toner-based systems are often regarded as incapable of handling conductive materials. This research reports recent laser printing development and its potential to replace conventional printed circuit board manufacturing steps, including conductive track deposition. The research had a dual focus, demonstrating proof of concept with conventional office laser printers (for artwork masks, etch resists, and seed layers for overplating), and used industrial laser printers with developmental toners to support direct production of electronics (conductive tracks, dielectric layers, and legends). The results confirm that laser printing can complement other digital printing approaches for directly depositing resists and conductive tracks.
  • The Influence of Residual Toner Charge on 3D Laser Printed Objects
    The Influence of Residual Toner Charge on 3D Laser Printed Objects Jones, Jason B.; Wimpenny, David Ian; Gibbons, G. J. (Greg) The recent advances in digital fabrication have nearly become synonymous with the formulation of functional inks and inkjet printing. Conversely, dry toner systems, despite their high productivity and maturity in 2D digital printing, have scarcely been utilized for 3D printing and digital fabrication, despite significant endeavor. This paper reviews the advantages that laser printing offers digital fabrication (over inkjet) and provides insights to overcome the technical barriers which to date have prevented it from gaining traction as a 3D printing technique.
  • Gateways Toward Dissimilar Multi-material Parts
    Gateways Toward Dissimilar Multi-material Parts Jones, Jason B.; Cooper, David E.; Wimpenny, D. I. (David I.); Gibbons, G. J. (Greg) Nature provides a pattern of complex systems in which materials with vastly dissimilar properties grow together and function in close proximity. Although the gap between biological and existing AM systems cannot be overstated, the aspiration for AM to mimic this capability of nature has been widely admired (but is currently limited to multi-material parts made from families of like materials). The recent ASTM F2921 standard provides the first standardized framework to identify anisotropic properties of printed parts. This research highlights how understanding and quantifying the anisotropies between and within layers of printed parts provides foundational understanding to begin to emulate nature’s pattern by consolidating dissimilar multi-material parts in AM which promises future potential to supersede conventional part assembly with integral printed systems.
  • Remanufacture of turbine blades by laser cladding, machining and in-process scanning in a single machine
    Remanufacture of turbine blades by laser cladding, machining and in-process scanning in a single machine Jones, Jason B.; McNutt, Phil; Tosi, Riccardo; Perry, Clinton; Wimpenny, David Ian Remanufacturing is one of the most efficient ways of recycling worn parts because it consumes only a fraction of the energy, cost, and material required for new parts. Remanufacture of engineering components typically entails serial labor intensive and operator skill sensitive processes, often requiring parts to move between manufacturers and subcontractors. Unfortunately the logistics and quality assurance measures required for effective remanufacturing currently restrict its implementation primarily to high value components (e.g. turbine blades, blisks, etc.). This research reports progress toward an integrated production system which combines laser cladding, machining and in-process scanning in a single machine for flexible and lean remanufacturing.
  • Printed Circuit Boards by Selective Deposition and Processing
    Printed Circuit Boards by Selective Deposition and Processing Jones, Jason B.; Wimpenny, D. I. (David I.); Chudasama, Rupesh; Gibbons, G. J. (Greg) With electronic applications on the horizon for AM, comes the dilemma of how to consolidate conductors, semi-conductors, and insulators in close proximity. To answer this challenge, laser printing (selective deposition) was used in tandem with fiber laser consolidation (selective processing) to produce PCBs for the first time. This combination offers the potential to generate tracks with high mechanical integrity and excellent electrical conductivity (close to bulk metal) without prolonged exposure of the substrate to elevated temperatures. Herein are the findings of a two-year feasibility study for a “one-stop” solution for producing PCBs (including conductive tracks, dielectric layers, protective resists, and legends).
  • Transfer methods toward additive manufacturing by electrophotography
    Transfer methods toward additive manufacturing by electrophotography Jones, Jason B.; Gibbons, G. J. (Greg); Wimpenny, D. I. (David I.)
  • Standards: Levelling the Playing Field
    Standards: Levelling the Playing Field Jones, Jason B. The claimed benefits of globally accepted standards include: promotion of knowledge, improved communication and better transparency in commerce. The voluntary implementation of consensus standards has also been summed up as “levelling the playing field” to the mutual benefit of all. After over a decade of discussing the need for international standards, and in consideration of the limited scope of existing standards, 60 members of the Additive Manufacturing (AM) community organized themselves as ASTM Committee F42 in early 2009 with the aim to develop a cohesive and comprehensive set of AM standards. This presentation will review the Committee’s inception and accomplishments in the first 1.5 years including the new standards developed. It will also offer a view on its acceptance and impact in the AM community, outline where it is headed and explain how to get involved.
  • Additive manufacturing by electrophotography: Challenges and successes.
    Additive manufacturing by electrophotography: Challenges and successes. Jones, Jason B.; Wimpenny, D. I. (David I.); Gibbons, G. J. (Greg); Sutcliffe, C.
  • Laser printed elastomeric parts and their properties.
    Laser printed elastomeric parts and their properties. Wimpenny, D. I. (David I.); Banerjee, Soumya; Jones, Jason B. The precise deposition of polymeric toner powder by laser printing is reliant on having powder particles with appropriate flow and uniform charge properties. Nanometer sized particles known as flow control agent (FCA) charge control agents (CCA) are used to modify powder behavior to provide the appropriate characteristic for printing. This paper shows how varying the quantity of FCA/CCA applied to the surface of Somos201 particles can affect the elongation to failure and ultimate tensile strength of laser printed tensile test specimens.
  • Customised rapid manufactured parts: Technology and case studies from the custom-fit project.
    Customised rapid manufactured parts: Technology and case studies from the custom-fit project. Jones, Jason B.; Wimpenny, D. I. (David I.) The design and manufacture of individually customised products is generally restricted to bespoke clothing or footwear for very wealthy customers. The aim of the Custom-Fit project is to develop a fast, flexible and economically viable route for the manufacture of individually customised parts. These products not only provide improved comfort levels but also provide better functional performance, including enhanced safety for the user. This 4.5 year, €16m project involving 30 partners across the breadth of the Europe finished last month. This presentation will showcase the technology developed: CAD packages which automate the design process and three new rapid manufacturing methods. The presentation includes case studies on a range of customised products, including customised seats for Ducati Motorcycles. The case studies not only demonstrate the performance benefits of individual customisation but also show the potential for new approaches to product design including both functionally graded structures and materials to achieve precise control of product performance.

Click here to view a full listing of Jason Jones' publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

JONES, J. B. served as task group chair to develop the standard below:

ASTM 2011. F2921 – Standard Terminology for Additive Manufacturing—Coordinate Systems and Test Methodologies. West Conshohocken, PA, USA: ASTM International.

Research interests/expertise

  • Additive Manufacturing
  • 3D printing
  • Remanufacturing
  • Digital printing
  • Digital fabrication/digital manufacturing
  • Dissimilar multi-material parts

Areas of teaching

I teach the following topics on the Rapid Product Development MSc

  • Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing)
  • High Speed Machining
  • Reverse Engineering

Membership of professional associations and societies

All current:

  • Additive Manufacturing Association, member since 2007
  • F2921 Task Group Chair (since 2010), ASTM International Standards Committee F42, member since 2009
  • Society of Imaging Science, member since 2010
  • Additive Manufacturing Net, since 2010
  • Advisor, SME Rapid Technologies and Additive Manufacturing Steering Committee, since 2012.
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