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Dr Adam Moroz

Job: Senior Research Fellow

Faculty: Technology

School/department: School of Engineering and Sustainable Development

Research group(s): Advanced Manufacturing Processes and Mechatronics Centre (AMPMC)

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH UK

T: +44 (0)116 250 66 49

E: AMoroz@dmu.ac.uk

W: http://www.dmu.ac.uk

 

Personal profile

More than 25 years of research experience in biophysics and biochemistry, working with spectroscopic experimental techniques and theoretical statistical and mathematical modelling in biochemistry, biophysics, physiology (normal and pathological – drug intoxication and cancer) and pharmacology, contributing to the non-linear absorption and resorption problems, applications of optimal control methods.  In particular, my biochemical research included studies in neuro-active amino acids, hormones, vitamins, liver pathology, biological stress, different intoxications, complex metabolic disorder.  From perspective of optimality and systems biology I am pursuing research in tissue regeneration, both in healthy and pathological conditions, and in molecular signalling mechanisms in tissue functioning.  I am also interested in theory of dynamical systems, maximum energy dissipation principle in biophysics, bioenergetics, bio-kinetics, biochemistry, biology; data analysis/mining and statistical modelling, stochastic processes and probability, molecular signal analysis, cooperative transitions in biological systems.

Research group affiliations

Additive Manufacturing Technology Group within Advanced Manufacturing Processes and Mechatronics Centre (AMPMC)

Integration of Engineering Technologies and Techniques in Biomedicine

Department of Engineering, Faculty of Technology, De Montfort University, Leicester

Publications and outputs 

  • Surface finish and properties enhancement of selective laser melted 316L stainless steel by surface mechanical attrition treatment
    Surface finish and properties enhancement of selective laser melted 316L stainless steel by surface mechanical attrition treatment Sun, Yong; Bailey, Richard; Moroz, Adam Selective laser melting (SLM) has been used to produce stainless steel components with nearly full density, targeting real engineering applications. However, materials processed by SLM suffer from an inherent problem of poor surface finish, which is not suitable for many practical applications. It is thus necessary to improve the surface finish and surface integrity of SLM components through post processing. The aim of this work is to improve the surface finish of SLM 316L stainless steel by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT), which involves bombarding the SLM sample surface with steel balls at a vibration frequency of 40 Hz for 10 min to 80 min. The surface finish, morphology, hardness and unlubricated sliding friction and wear behaviour were investigated. The results show that SMAT is very effective in smoothing the SLM 316L surface, reducing the surface roughness by up to 96% and achieving a surface finish comparable to that produced by surface grinding. SMAT also has the added benefits of increasing surface hardness, reducing friction and improving dry sliding wear resistance of SLM 316 L stainless steel. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • An Investigation into the Effects of Teacher Involvement and Influence on the Creativity of Children in the Classroom
    An Investigation into the Effects of Teacher Involvement and Influence on the Creativity of Children in the Classroom Baines, E.; Madani, R.; Moroz, Adam; Makled, B. Children have potential for demonstrating increased creativity where certain negative influences are removed during the creative process. These negative influences include the involvement of the teacher in the art and design class at school. This study establishes through primary and secondary research the different ways that teachers engage with children as potential influences that are tested through experimentation. The study was concerned with revealing levels of creativity in designs as well as signs of adult influence. The results revealed that different types of involvement do have a negative impact on creativity, especially giving children instructions.
  • Investigating the Demand for Short-shelf Life Food Products for SME Wholesalers
    Investigating the Demand for Short-shelf Life Food Products for SME Wholesalers Raju, Y.; Kang, Parminder Singh; Moroz, Adam; Clement, Ross; Hopwell, Ashley; Duffy, A. P. Accurate forecasting of fresh produce demand is one the challenges faced by Small Medium Enterprise (SME) wholesalers. This paper is an attempt to understand the cause for the high level of variability such as weather, holidays etc., in demand of SME wholesalers. Therefore, understanding the significance of unidentified factors may improve the forecasting accuracy. This paper presents the current literature on the factors used to predict demand and the existing forecasting techniques of short shelf life products. It then investigates a variety of internal and external possible factors, some of which is not used by other researchers in the demand prediction process. The results presented in this paper are further analysed using a number of techniques to minimize noise in the data. For the analysis past sales data (January 2009 to May 2014) from a UK based SME wholesaler is used and the results presented are limited to product ‘Milk’ focused on café’s in derby. The correlation analysis is done to check the dependencies of variability factor on the actual demand. Further PCA analysis is done to understand the significance of factors identified using correlation. The PCA results suggest that the cloud cover, weather summary and temperature are the most significant factors that can be used in forecasting the demand. The correlation of the above three factors increased relative to monthly and becomes more stable compared to the weekly and daily demand.
  • Electropolishing of re-melted SLM stainless steel 316L parts using deep eutectic solvents: 3x3 full factorial design
    Electropolishing of re-melted SLM stainless steel 316L parts using deep eutectic solvents: 3x3 full factorial design Alrbaey, K.; Wimpenny, David Ian; Al-Barzinjjy, A. A.; Moroz, Adam This three-level three-factor full factorial study describes the effects of electropolishing using deep eutectic solvents on the surface roughness of re-melted 316L stainless steel samples produced by the selective laser melting (SLM) powder bed fusion additive manufacturing method. An improvement in the surface finish of re-melted stainless steel 316L parts was achieved by optimizing the processing parameters for a relatively environmentally friendly electropolishing process using a Choline Chloride ionic electrolyte. The results show that further improvement of the response value-average surface roughness (Ra) can be obtained by electropolishing after re-melting to yield a 75% improvement compared to the as-built Ra. The best Ra value was less than 0.5 lm, obtained with a potential of 4 V, maintained for 30 min at 40 C. Electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing the residual oxide film formed during the remelting process. The material dissolution during the process is not homogenous and is directed preferentially toward the iron and nickel, leaving the surface rich in chromium with potentially enhanced properties. The re-melted and polished surface of the samples gave an approximately 20% improvement in fatigue life at low stresses (approximately 570 MPa). The results of the study demonstrate that a combination of re-melting and electropolishing provides a flexible method for surface texture improvement which is capable of delivering a significant improvement in surface finish while holding the dimensional accuracy of parts within an acceptable range. The authors acknowledge the significant support provided by researchers from the Materials Centre, Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester (Dr Harris, Robert C., Dr Juma, Jamil ‎ and particularly Karl S. Ryder, Professor of Physical Chemistry). The affiliation of co-author A.A.Al-Barzinjy at time of submission of the article and duration of the experimental work, was the Materials Centre, Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Realising a child's imagination through a child-led product design for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional products
    Realising a child's imagination through a child-led product design for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional products Madani, R.; Moroz, Adam; Baines, E.; Makled, B. Realising a child's imagination through a child-led product design for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional products
  • Evaluation of Suitability of Rapid Prototyping Techniques for Use by Children
    Evaluation of Suitability of Rapid Prototyping Techniques for Use by Children Madani, R.; Moroz, Adam; Baines, E.; Makled, B. Technology that facilitates rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing has become increasingly available to the ordinary user in the home, the office, or at school. These rapid prototyping technologies should make it possible to offer school children the opportunity to design and then realise three dimensional (3D) objects. One of the perceived benefits of this is that children can become more involved in the process of producing 3D objects. Unfortunately, because of the nature of the available of the technology, and the issues associated with access to materials, adult help, supervision and assistance are often required, depriving children of the opportunity to create and produce freely, taking ownership of the process. This study evaluates the different techniques and materials available to children, highlighting their benefits and limitations, and reaching a conclusion about which materials and techniques are the most suitable for achieving a child-led approach to production. The study concludes that Cubify Cube is the most appropriate solution in terms of ease of use, not requiring adult assistance or supervision or the realisation of designs. This is a paper produced by Rafat Madani as part of his PhD research, under the supervision of Dr Adam Moroz and Dr Emily Baines (both at De Montfort University), with some specialist advice from Belal Makled.
  • On Optimization of Surface Roughness of Selective Laser Melted Stainless Steel Parts: A Statistical Study
    On Optimization of Surface Roughness of Selective Laser Melted Stainless Steel Parts: A Statistical Study Airbaey, K.; Wimpenny, David Ian; Tosi, Riccardo; Manning, Warren; Moroz, Adam In this work, the effects of re-melting parameters for postprocessing the surface texture of Additively Manufactured parts using a statistical approach are investigated. This paper focuses on improving the final surface texture of stainless steel (316L) parts, built using a Renishaw SLM 125 machine. This machine employs a fiber laser to fuse fine powder on a layer-by-layer basis to generate three-dimensional parts. The samples were produced using varying angles of inclination in order to generate range of surface roughness between 8 and 20 lm. Laser re-melting (LR) as post-processing was performed in order to investigate surface roughness through optimization of parameters. The re-melting process was carried out using a custom-made hybrid laser re-cladding machine, which uses a 200 W fiber laser. Optimized processing parameters were based on statistical analysis within a Design of Experiment framework, from which a model was then constructed. The results indicate that the best obtainable final surface roughness is about 1.4 lm±10%. This figure was obtained when laser power of about 180 W was used, to give energy density between 2200 and 2700 J/cm2 for the re-melting process. Overall, the obtained results indicate LR as a postbuild process has the capacity to improve surface finishing of SLM components up to 80%, compared with the initial manufactured surface.
  • Sliding Wear Characteristics and Corrosion Behaviour of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel
    Sliding Wear Characteristics and Corrosion Behaviour of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel Sun, Yong; Moroz, Adam; Alrbaey, K. Stainless steel is one of the most popular materials used for selective laser melting (SLM) processing to produce nearly fully dense components from 3D CAD models. The tribological and corrosion properties of stainless steel components are important in many engineering applications. In this work, the wear behaviour of SLM 316L stainless steel was investigated under dry sliding conditions, and the corrosion properties were measured electrochemically in a chloride containing solution. The results show that as compared to the standard bulk 316L steel, the SLM 316L steel exhibits deteriorated dry sliding wear resistance. The wear rate of SLM steel is dependent on the vol.% porosity in the steel and by obtaining full density it is possible achieve wear resistance similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel. In the tested chloride containing solution, the general corrosion behaviour of the SLM steel is similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel, but the SLM steel suffers from a reduced breakdown potential and is more susceptible to pitting corrosion. Efforts have been made to correlate the obtained results with porosity in theSLM steel.
  • Design and Manufacture of Customised Denture Frameworks Using Magics®/Autofab® and SLM
    Design and Manufacture of Customised Denture Frameworks Using Magics®/Autofab® and SLM Kutiyal, S.; Moroz, Adam; Attenborough, E.; Alrbaey, K. Layer additive manufacturing technologies are progressing from rapid prototyping and rapid tooling. The development of finished parts made of metal powders without post processing is especially suitable for creation of precision part/object from small to mass customized fabrication; hence is the key application of these technologies. Laser based layer manufacturing techniques are mostly preferred in medical industry, particularly in the manufacture of denture frameworks; since these need to good mechanical properties and density. The introduction of new fibre and disc equipped system has significantly improved the accuracy of the processed components. The main objective of this work is to illustrate how this technology can be effectively used in the manufacturing of denture frameworks.
  • Design and Manufacturing of Children’s Remote Control for Child Viewing
    Design and Manufacturing of Children’s Remote Control for Child Viewing Madani, R.; Moroz, Adam; Baines, E. This paper presents a child-centred product design development process to produce a customised fingerprint-activated remote control for children using additive manufacturing technology. The paper is centred on the idea of using children's input in a design process using the imagination of the child. The My Remote manages television viewing content for children, restricts inappropriate content, controls viewing time and helps maintain a safe distance from the television screen. A finger-shaped design shaped by children based on the fingerprint recognition and the action of pointing at the television was adopted, which demonstrated a synergy of functional and aesthetic design. The design process considered 4D elements, such as interface design, navigation, mood lighting and sounds, and 3D representations using Solid Works showing various colour schemes. Prototype models were produced using SLA (Stereolithography) and FDM (fused deposit modelling) techniques, allowing for ergonomic testing and visualisation. The study found that including children's input allowed subtle adaptations in the design requirements of the children because they were able to ergonomically test the remote control. The research culminated in a prototype model finger-shaped design, thich fulfilled the criteria that it had to be innovative, inspired and liked by children, be comfortable and demonstrate functional requirements. This design has an international patent associated with this product, in the name of Rafat Madani.

 Click here for a full listing of Adam Moroz's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

Moroz A., The common extremalities in biology and physics, pp.379. Second Edition. Elsevier Insights, 2012.

Moroz A., Wimpenny D.I., (2011) On the variational framework employing optimal control for biochemical thermodynamics. Chemical Physics, 380, 77-85. Doi:10.1016/j.chemphys.2010.12.009.

Moroz A. (2010). Cooperative and collective effects in light of the maximum energy dissipation principle, Physics Letters A, 374, 2005-2010.

Moroz A, (2009). A variational framework for nonlinear chemical thermodynamics employing the maximum energy dissipation principle, J Phys Chem B, 113, 8086-8090.

Moroz A, (2008). On a variational formulation of the Maximum Energy Dissipation principle for nonequilibrium chemical thermodynamics. Chem Phys Lett, 427, 448-452.

Research interests/expertise

- bioengineering– additive manufacturing technology in combination with optimisation techniques in development of new generation of bone implants/ scaffolds.

- biophysics and biochemistry  - molecular mechanisms (particularly based on Schiff Base) of post-translational modification of enzymes, receptor and messengers at drug intoxication.  Mechanisms and processes involved in bone remodelling.  Maximum energy dissipation approach to biokinetics and bio-evolution.

- biokinetical modelling (binding-, enzyme-, pharmaco-kinetics).

- multileveled physiological modelling with a number of compartments from 10 to 20 including enzyme metabolism of substrates and non linear absorption and resorption mechanisms.

- bio-medical statistical modelling: factor-, cluster-, survival-, discriminant- and regression-analysis; Matlab, MathCad, SAS, C++.

- dynamical optimal control in applications to physiological kinetics, cancer, pharmaco-kinetics and treatment optimisation, binding, enzyme and cellular models.

- hierarchical systems control approachto mathematical modelling of the different tissues (particularly bone tissue) and organs.

- bioenergetics – optimisational principles in biokinetics, maximum energy dissipation principle in biophysics, biochemistry, system biology, cooperativity.

-   cell biology  -  role of osteoclasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes in the bone tissue turnover. 

Areas of teaching

- Rapid Product Development MSc Course Leader;

Module leader for the following subjects:

- Rapid Prototyping Techniques
- Research Methods
- Virtual Prototyping

Qualifications

Cand.Sci., PhD

Courses taught

Biophysics

Biochemistry

Mathematical Modelling

Membership of professional associations and societies

European Society for Mathematical and Theoretical Biology

Conference attendance

European Conference on Mathematical and Theoretical Biology (ECMTB 2011) Krakow, Poland, June 28- July 2, 2011.

The 2nd International Conference on Polymers & Moulds Innovations(PMI 2007), Ghent, Belgium, 2007.

European Conference on Mathematical and Theoretical Biology (ECMTB 2005) Dresden, Germany, July 18-22, 2005.

Current research students

Rafat Madani, PhD, 1st supervisor.

Khalid Alrbaey, PhD, 2nd supervisor.

Li Ju Wei, PhD, 2nd supervisor.

Professional esteem indicators

Editorial board member of Journal of Clinical Rehabilitative Tissue Engineering Research 2005-2010.

Reviewer for International Journal “Biomechanics and Modelling in Mechanobiology”, Springer.

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