Dr Mark Scase

Job: Associate Professor

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: School of Applied Social Sciences

Research group(s): Psychology

Address: De Montfort, University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 257 7811

E: mscase@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/markscase

 

Personal profile

Mark's interests include:

  • Vision
  • Visual dysfunction
  • Colour vision
  • Motion perception
  • Technology and how people interact with it
  • Functional imaging of the human visual system
  • The visual interpretation of graphical displays
  • Psychological wellbeing

Research group affiliations

Psychology

Publications and outputs 

  • Using every day client and advocate clinical interviews to gather outcome measurements – a mixed methods framework
    Using every day client and advocate clinical interviews to gather outcome measurements – a mixed methods framework Bixley, Morag; Williamson, I.; Scase, M. O. Abstract introduction Aphasia is a multimodality language difficulty experienced by people who have a left sided stroke. Speech and Language Therapists (SLTs) who work with People with Aphasia (PWA) often provide word finding therapy because word finding difficulties (wfd) are one of the most debilitating effects of aphasic language loss. The majority of published word finding research uses mixed therapy techniques in which PWA practise accessing, using and combining sounds and words. This therapy trial is one of only three case studies that describe PWA receiving therapy that is purely semantic. Semantic therapy is particularly relevant to people with severe aphasia. This is because the evidence base underpinning language therapy for PWA supports therapy for people who can talk: very little research addresses the problems of those who have very limited access to output. This case study was designed to add to the evidence base that supports language therapy for people with severe aphasia who have no access to propositional speech. Abstract Method This paper reports on a single therapy trial conducted within a cohort of ten individual semantic therapy trails. Research design incorporated best practise recommendations for therapy studies (Brady et al, 2012, Tate et al, 2008 and Moher et al 2001). In the first six weeks of this single therapy trial, P participated in six therapy sessions of semantic therapy with word finding (SAT with). In a further six weeks of therapy P was provided with semantic therapy without word finding (SAT without). Results and conclusions Descriptive and statistical analysis of the impact of therapy suggested that P’s word finding skills improved after both types of semantic therapy. The effects of therapy generalised and were permanent. There was some suggestion that SAT with therapy was more successful that SAT without therapy, but this difference may have been attributable to an order effect. This abstract provides single clinical case evidence to support impairment based semantic therapy for people with severe aphasia.
  • End-user frustrations and failures in digital technology: exploring the role of Fear of Missing Out, Internet addiction and personality
    End-user frustrations and failures in digital technology: exploring the role of Fear of Missing Out, Internet addiction and personality Hadlington, L. J.; Scase, M. O. The present study aimed to explore the potential relationship between individual differences in responses to failures with digital technology. In total, 630 participants (50% male) aged between 18e68 years (M ¼ 41.41, SD ¼ 14.18) completed an online questionnaire. This included a self-report, response to failures in digital technology scale, a measure of Fear of Missing Out, Internet addiction, and the BIG-5 personality traits. Fear of Missing Out, Internet addiction, extraversion, and neuroticism all served as significant positive predictors for maladaptive responses to failures in digital technology. Agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness acted as significant negative predictors for maladaptive responses to failures in digital technology. The responses to failures in digital technology scale presented good internal reliability, with items loading onto four key factors, these being; ‘maladaptive responses’, ‘adaptive responses’, ‘external support and venting frustrations’, and ‘anger and resignation’. The findings are discussed in the context of the end user experience, particularly where individual differences are seen to influence the level of frustration arising from a failure. The findings are also seen as a potential route for reducing the negative impact of failures in digital technology, particularly in the context of organisational productivity and responses to malicious cyberattacks. open access article
  • Fearing Compassion Has No Effect on Physiological Indicators Despite Changes in Psychological Well-Being
    Fearing Compassion Has No Effect on Physiological Indicators Despite Changes in Psychological Well-Being Gill, J. K.; Scase, M. O. Objectives: Research has not yet understood whether fears of compassion prevent effectiveness of compassionate interventions on physical and psychological well-being. This study anticipated higher fears of compassion would lead to greater physiological responses, higher self-criticism and psychological distress whilst reducing social safeness. Design: Independent groups of high and low fears of compassion were allocated using a median split during data collation. Galvanic skin response (GSR) and pulse were the dependent physical variables, and social safeness, self-criticism and psychological symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress were the psychological dependent variables. Method: 60 undergraduate students aged 18-43 were sampled from De Montfort University. A median split resulted in 31 participants in the high fears group and 29 in the low fears group. All participants were asked to read information sheets and sign two consent forms. Participants then completed the Fears of Compassion Scale, the Forms of Self-Criticism/Self-Reassuring Scale, the Social Safeness Scale and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Two compassionate exercises were then administered using audio headsets whilst pulse and GSR were measured using AD instruments. Finally, participants were debriefed, thanked for their time and informed they could withdraw their data up to three days after the experiment. Results: Despite, a non-significant finding on physiological indicators, a significant result was found on psychological indicators of well-being, (F(3,56)= 5.721, p<.01, Wilks Lambda = .765, partial n2= .235). Independent analysis found differences in social safeness (F(1,58)= 14.46, p<.01, partial n2= .20) and DASS (F(1,58)= 6.53, p<.05, partial n2= .101). Social safeness was higher in the low fears of compassion group, 46.87 (SD= 6.06), whilst DASS was greater in the high fears group, 23.34 (SD= 12.91). Conclusions: These findings suggested despite psychological effects from fearing compassion, fears do not have any impact on physical soothing. This suggested compassionate exercises remain effective for reducing physiological factors of distress for those with higher fears of compassion but may hinder improvement in psychological distress.
  • Interactive Audio Tactile Maps for Pre-Navigation Improve Spatial Learning in Visually Impaired People.
    Interactive Audio Tactile Maps for Pre-Navigation Improve Spatial Learning in Visually Impaired People. Scase, M. O.; Griffin, Edward; Picinali, Lorenzo Pre-navigational tools can assist visually impaired people when navigating unfamiliar environments. We assessed the effectiveness of an interactive audio-tactile-map (ATM) in blind and visually impaired people. We found that participants exposed to an ATM recalled the map significantly better than those given a conventional tactile map accompanied by text description.
  • User Reactions to Failures and Frustrations within Cyber Environments – Systematic Coding of Previous Work (URM Coding)
    User Reactions to Failures and Frustrations within Cyber Environments – Systematic Coding of Previous Work (URM Coding) Scase, M. O.; Hadlington, L. J.; Rai, R.
  • Users Reactions to Failures and Frustrations Within Cyber Environments – Literature Review Update
    Users Reactions to Failures and Frustrations Within Cyber Environments – Literature Review Update Scase, M. O.; Hadlington, L. J.; Rai, R.; Westmacott, M.; Turner, C.
  • Development and Evaluation of Cognitive Games to Promote Health and Wellbeing in Elderly People with Mild Cognitive Impairment
    Development and Evaluation of Cognitive Games to Promote Health and Wellbeing in Elderly People with Mild Cognitive Impairment Scase, M. O.; Kreiner, K.; Ascolese, A. Background: In Europe the number of elderly people is increasing. This population growth has resulted in higher healthcare costs. The purpose of this project was to try to promote active ageing in people aged 65-80 with mild cognitive impairment through cognitive games delivered via a tablet computer. Objectives: Age-appropriate cognitive games were developed targeting different aspects of cognition and then experiences of elderly people using these games were evaluated. Methods: The design of games was developed through iterative user-centered design focus groups with elderly people as participants. The experiences of participants playing the games over a 47 day period were explored through semi-structured interviews. Results: Four games were developed that addressed a range of cognitive functions such as perception, attention, memory, language, comprehension and executive function. The participants were able to play these games without external intervention over an extended period and reported positively on their experiences . Conclusion: Cognitive games can be used successfully by people with mild cognitive impairment to promote active ageing. Open access article
  • Turned On, Tuned In, Dropped Out:The Impact of Ever Present Technology on Human Behaviour and Decision Making.
    Turned On, Tuned In, Dropped Out:The Impact of Ever Present Technology on Human Behaviour and Decision Making. Scase, M. O.; Hadlington, L. J.; Rai, R.
  • Development of and adherence to a computer-based gamified environment designed to promote health and wellbeing in older people with mild cognitive impairment.
    Development of and adherence to a computer-based gamified environment designed to promote health and wellbeing in older people with mild cognitive impairment. Scase, M. O.; Marandure, B. N.; Hancox, J.; Kreiner, K.; Hanke, S.; Kropf, J. Background: The older population of Europe is increasing and there has been a corresponding increase in long term care costs. This project sought to promote active ageing by delivering tasks via a tablet computer to participants aged 65-80 with mild cognitive impairment. Objectives: An age-appropriate gamified environment was developed and adherence to this solution was assessed through an intervention. Methods: The gamified environment was developed through focus groups. Mixed methods were used in the intervention with the time spent engaging with applications recorded supplemented by participant interviews to gauge adherence. There were two groups of participants: one living in a retirement village and the other living separately across a city. Results: The retirement village participants engaged in more than three times the number of game sessions compared to the other group possibly because of different social arrangements between the groups. Conclusion: A gamified environment can help older people engage in computer-based applications. However, social community factors influence adherence in a longer term intervention. Open Access
  • Reasoning and Data Representation in a Health and Lifestyle Support System
    Reasoning and Data Representation in a Health and Lifestyle Support System Hanke, S.; Kreiner, K.; Kropf, J.; Scase, M. O.; Gossy, C. Case-based reasoning and data interpretation is an artificial intelligence approach that capitalizes on past experience to solve current problems and this can be used as a method for practical intelligent systems. Case-based data reasoning is able to provide decision support for experts and clinicians in health systems as well as lifestyle systems. In this project we were focusing on developing a solution for healthy ageing considering daily activities, nutrition as well as cognitive activities. The data analysis of the reasoner followed state of the art guidelines from clinical practice. Guidelines provide a general framework to guide clinicians, and require consequent background knowledge to become operational, which is precisely the kind of information recorded in practice cases; cases complement guidelines very well and helps to interpret them. It is expected that the interest in case-based reasoning systems in the health.

Click here for a full listing of Mark Scase‘s publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Human visual perception.
  • How people interact with technology
  • Visual dysfunction
  • Inherited and acquired visual disorders
  • Colour vision
  • Motion perception
  • Face perception
  • Functional imaging (fMRI)
  • Psychological experimental methods (psychophysics)

Areas of teaching

  • Vision
  • Biological psychology
  • Cognitive Neuropsychology
  • Approaches to the study of well-being

Qualifications

PhD, MA

Courses taught

Membership of external committees

 

Membership of professional associations and societies

  • Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology 1989
  • Associate member of the College of Optometrists 1993
  • Member of the British Psychological Society 1994
  • Chartered Psychologist 1994
  • Member of the Applied Vision Association 1994
  • Member of the International Colour Vision Society 1994
  • Member of the Experimental Psychology Society 1994
  • Member of the Vision Sciences Society 2001
  • Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society 2006
  • Member of the Association for Psychological Science 2008
  • Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy 2017

Conference attendance

On the psychological processes of decision making in displays of electromagnetic data, 2011, Progress in Electromagnetic Research, Marrakesh, Scase, M O, Shafiullah, M and Duffy, A P. Paper

A case of developmental prosopagnosia. 2008, Applied Vision Association, Manchester University, Hill, L and Scase, M O. Poster.

Removal of individual features from famous faces: The development of a novel test. 2008, Vision Sciences Society, Naples, F L, Hill, L and Scase, M O. Poster.

The application of podcasting to the enhancement of learning in psychology students. 2008, Higher Education Academy, Bath Spa University, Scase, M O. Paper.

Consultancy work

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory
Vision and visual dysfunction, experimental psychology.
Worked with: Pocklington Trust, RNIB

Current research students

Donato, L., PT, 1st supervisor

Ahmed Omarjee, N., FT, 1st supervisor

Taylor, S., PT, 2nd supervisor

Feakes, C., PT, 2nd supervisor

Bixley, M., PT, 2nd supervisor

Externally funded research grants information

  • €2939997 DOREMI  Decrease of cognitive decline, malnutrition and sedentariness by elderly empowerment in lifestyle management and social inclusion.  EU FP7 project with €215,840 coming to DMU.  2013 (with H Istance, DMU)
  • £20434 Users’ Reactions to Failures and Frustrations Within Cyber Environments. DSTL. 2013 (with J. Hall and A. Attrill, DMU)
  • £33499 Cognitive and Behavioural Concepts of Cyber Activities: Information Processing of Online Content. DSTL. 2012 (with L. Hadlington and A. Attrill, DMU)
  • £29400 Review of evidence on evaluation of effectiveness of models and interventions to promote primary and secondary eye health care. RNIB. 2010 (with M Johnson, DMU)

Internally funded research project information

  • £19194 Acquisition of Eye tracking equipment for computer science and psychology collaboration. 1/11/2013 to 31/8/2014 (with H. Istance and S. Vickers) CI RCIF2
  • £24420  Virtual Reality Multi-functional Framework for the Evaluation, Validation and Customisation of Assistive Technologies – Proof of Concept. 7/1/2013 to 31/8/2013 (with L. Picinali) CI  RCIF2How useful is podcasting as a tool for elearning within applied social sciences? 2007-2008 (TQEF fund). £868
  • An examination factors affecting the accuracy of identifications from police identification parades. 2008 (with E Noon, DMU) HEIF, £7308

Professional esteem indicators

  • Journal of Vision
  • Perception

Search Who's Who

 

 
News target area image
News

DMU is a dynamic university, read about what we have been up to in our latest news section.

Events target area image
Events

At DMU there is always something to do or see, check out our events for yourself.

Mission and vision target area image
Mission and vision

Read about our mission and vision and how these create a supportive and exciting learning environment.