Dr Jon Waterfield

Job: Associate Professor in Pharmacy Practice

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: Leicester School of Pharmacy

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 257 7718

E: jwaterfield@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/hls

 

Personal profile

Jon Waterfield registered as a pharmacist in 1984 having completed his pharmacy degree at the University of Bradford. He has held various positions as a community pharmacist-manager and was national Pharmacy Training Manager for Lloyds Pharmacy. In 2005 he joined the Leicester School of Pharmacy where he teaches clinical pharmacy and pharmacy practice.

Jon is Pharmacy Programme Leader  and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. His main research interests include: pharmacy education, professionalism, theories of knowledge in relation to pharmacy, the role of the community pharmacist and public health.

Jon is author of the text book 'Community Pharmacy Handbook' and has also co-authored the book 'Fundamental Aspects of Medicines' which is a training resource to support safe and effective use of medicines in community care. 

Research group affiliations

Pharmacy Practice

Institute for Education Futures

Publications and outputs 

  • How is the term ‘competence’ defined by the pharmacy educator? A qualitative study of science-based and practice-based pharmacy educators
    How is the term ‘competence’ defined by the pharmacy educator? A qualitative study of science-based and practice-based pharmacy educators Waterfield, Jon Background: A simple definition of ‘competence’ has resulted in a concept that is mainly related to tasks and outcomes. A more detailed knowledge of how pharmacy educators define competence can support future development of teaching and assessment of pharmacy undergraduates. Aim: The overall aim of this research was to gain some insight into the views of different pharmacy educators and their perception of the term ‘competence’. Method: A thematic analysis of a total of 12 semi-structured, one hour interviews with four academic members of staff from three different Schools of Pharmacy in England. Results: Both science-based and practice-based respondents defined competence in terms of a construct defined by a group of peers. Practitioners were more hesitant about the use of competence-based assessment compared to scientists. Conclusion: There are indications from the interview narratives that there is a need for a deeper dialogue about competence and more emphasis on the development of ongoing, individual competence. Open Access journal
  • Exploring the prevalence of and factors associated with advice on prescription medicines: A survey of community pharmacies in an English city
    Exploring the prevalence of and factors associated with advice on prescription medicines: A survey of community pharmacies in an English city Rivers, Peter; Waterfield, Jon; Grootveld, M.; Raynor, D. K. Service users rely upon pharmacy staff to provide advice on prescription medicines. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of advice-giving in pharmacies located across different areas within an inner-city population. A questionnaire was administered with service users outside 29 community pharmacies in an English Midlands city between February and July 2014. The primary outcome measure was the percentage who had received information or advice when collecting a prescription medicine. A total of 1206 service users took part, of whom 49.1% were female and 50.9% were of minority ethnicity (48.8% white British). The age ranges were: 17–30 years (21.0%), 31–60 years (55.0%) and 61–80+ years (24.1%). Sixty-nine per cent of participants had collected a prescription for themselves, and the proportions of new and repeat prescriptions were 22.1% and 77.6% respectively. A subset of 141 participants had requested advice, of whom 94% confirmed that they had received it. Overall, 28.6% of 1065 participants received unsolicited information or advice. The overall prevalence of unsolicited advice-giving varied per pharmacy from 14% to 63% and for new and repeat prescriptions was 41.9% and 25.5% respectively (p < .001, new vs repeat). In areas of greater deprivation, a higher proportion of service users of minority ethnicity received unsolicited repeat prescription advice, compared to that of white British (33.0% vs 17.3% respectively; p < .001). Thus, the low incidence and contrasting patterns of prescription advice-giving suggests that the training and expertise of pharmacy staff may not always be used effectively within the UK NHS. Therefore, the current challenge is how community pharmacies can work in partnership with colleagues across the wider healthcare system when optimising the use of medicines and reducing health inequalities. The research performed here provides new insights reflecting the low prevalence of advice-giving and potential inequity associated with delivery of this pharmacy service. This research was conducted in collaboration with the University of Leeds School of Healthcare. Open Access article
  • An investigation of pharmacy student perception of competence-based learning using the individual Skills Evaluation and Development program, iSED
    An investigation of pharmacy student perception of competence-based learning using the individual Skills Evaluation and Development program, iSED Allen, Susan; Waterfield, Jon; Rivers, Peter The Objective Structured Clinical Exercise (OSCE) is the mainstay of clinical competence evaluation of healthcare professionals. The iSED® (individualised Skills Evaluation and Development) program, developed by Leicester School of Pharmacy, embraces various learning theories and was conceived to enhance the OSCE experience and facilitate students’ self-regulation in developing clinical competence. Aim: To explore pharmacy students’ experience of using iSED® to develop clinical competence. Method: Data were collected using a mixed methods study comprising an attitudinal Likert-style questionnaire, completed by second year MPharm students at Leicester School of Pharmacy, and focus groups with second year and third year students. Results: Students expressed a positive perception towards iSED®, characterised by three emergent themes: ‘Visualisation and nature of feedback’, ‘Self-regulation and cyclical learning’, ‘Seeing yourself as others see you’. Conclusion: Experience of iSED® supports clinical skills development through objective self-observation against a gold standard and facilitates understanding of individual learner identity. This is an Open Access Journal.
  • Using Bourdieu's Theoretical Framework to Examine How the Pharmacy Educator Views Pharmacy Knowledge
    Using Bourdieu's Theoretical Framework to Examine How the Pharmacy Educator Views Pharmacy Knowledge Waterfield, Jon Objective. To explore how different pharmacy educators view pharmacy knowledge within the United Kingdom MPharm program and to relate these findings to Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical framework. Methods. Twelve qualitative interviews were conducted with 4 faculty members from 3 different types of schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom: a newer school, an established teaching-based school, and an established research-intensive school. Selection was based on a representation of both science- based and practice-based disciplines, gender balance, and teaching experience. Results. The interview transcripts indicated how these members of the academic community describe knowledge. There was a polarization between science-based and practice-based educators in terms of Bourdieu’s description of field, species of capital, and habitus. Conclusion. A Bourdieusian perspective on the differences among faculty member responses supports our understanding of curriculum integration and offers some practical implications for the future development of pharmacy programs. This article is an Open Access journal.
  • An evaluation of a reflective writing assessment within the MPharm programme
    An evaluation of a reflective writing assessment within the MPharm programme Root, Helen; Waterfield, Jon
  • Fundamental Aspects of Medicines
    Fundamental Aspects of Medicines Waterfield, Jon; Rivers, Peter This highly practical guide is an essential reference and training resource for all individuals involved in the delivery of care. Covering a wide range of common topics associated with medicines and their administration in the care sector, it will be useful for all care assistants and individuals caring for others in the community. From why medicines are formulated in different ways, to the types of home remedies typically used in a residential home, this title has the answer. Clear examples and training exercises contextualise the safe use of medicine within the care sector and test the reader's understanding. This resource will ensure technical information on medication becomes more accessible for the care worker.
  • Two approaches to vocational education and training. A view from pharmacy education.
    Two approaches to vocational education and training. A view from pharmacy education. Waterfield, Jon
  • Overview of hypertension treatment.
    Overview of hypertension treatment. Waterfield, Jon
  • Monitoring hypertension: how and why.
    Monitoring hypertension: how and why. Waterfield, Jon
  • Is pharmacy a knowledge based profession?
    Is pharmacy a knowledge based profession? Waterfield, Jon

Click here for a full listing of Jon Waterfield‘s publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

Current areas of interest include:

  • Pharmacy education with a specific interest in the relationship between theory and practice
  • How competence is interpreted and assessed within a vocational and educational setting
  • Working with students as partners in educational research to develop situational learning
  • The role and professional identity of the community pharmacist
  • The pharmacist as a public health practitioner
  • Medicines management within a care home environment

Areas of teaching

Jon teaches across a range of MPharm modules at all levels of the MPharm programme and leads the  third year module 'Skills for Practice'.

  • Specialist areas of teaching include: clinical governance/risk management, consultation skills, pharmacy services and public health
  • Supervisor of final year projects in pharmacy practice and pharmacy education
  • MPharm Programme Leader 

Other areas of teaching include:
  • Teaching and research project support for postgraduate clinical pharmacy diploma and MSc students
  • Legal aspects of Independent and Supplementary Prescribing

Qualifications

EdD (2014)

MSc (Pharmacology) (1993)

PGCE (1985)

BPharm (Hons) (1984)

Honours and awards

 

Membership of professional associations and societies

  • Registered with General Pharmaceutical Council
  • Member of Royal Pharmaceutical Society
  • Senior Fellow of Higher Education Academy 

Conference attendance

Waterfield, J. (2017) Qualitative evaluation of student perception of a new ‘speed-dating’ format for the teaching of a clinical topic (skin conditions). Pharmacy Education; 17(1) 187 (Poster presentation at Pharmacy Education Conference 26th June 2017, University of Manchester, Manchester.)

 Waterfield, J. and Rivers, P. (2016) An exploration of how ‘competence’ is described and interpreted by the pharmacy undergraduate student and pharmacy practitioner. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, (24) Supplement 3, 109-110. (Poster presentation at Royal Pharmaceutical Society Conference, September 2016)

 Waterfield, J. and Rivers, P. (2016) A qualitative evaluation of an integrated, student-led approach to formative skills-based assessment using students as partners. (Oral presentation at Pharmacy Education Conference; 27th June 2016; University of Manchester, Manchester.)

Waterfield, J. (2015) How is the term ‘competence’ defined by the pharmacy educator?(Oral presentation at Monash Pharmacy Education Symposium, Transforming practice through education, 5-8 July 2015, Prato, Italy.)

Rivers, P. and Waterfield, J. (2015) Development of an MPharm module ‘Pharmacotherapy: from Person to Population’ based upon a Constructivist / Professional Unit of Study. https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:266169 (Oral presentation at Pharmacy Education Conference; 29th June 2015; The University of Manchester, Manchester.)

 Rivers, P., Waterfield, J., Afsar, A., Ali, M., Davgun, H. and Fazal, N. (2014) Perceived stress and fear of being blamed for medication errors in staff responsible for the administration of medicines in care homes. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (22) Supplement 2, 11 -12. (Oral presentation at Royal Pharmaceutical Society Conference, September 2014)

 Waterfield, J. (2014) How is pharmacy knowledge defined by pharmacy educators? International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (22) Supplement 2,15 (Oral presentation at Royal Pharmaceutical Society Conference, September 2014)

 Waterfield, J. (2014) Development of the integration of pharmaceutical science and pharmacy practice through a new model of Pharmacy Practice Skills (PPS) practical classes. https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:226758 (Oral presentation at Pharmacy Education Conference; 30th June 2014; The University of Manchester, Manchester.)

Waterfield, J. (2014) An exploration of the academic viewpoint of integration, using a Bernsteinian perspective.  https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:226757 (Poster presentation at Pharmacy Education Conference; 30th June 2014; The University of Manchester, Manchester.)

Rivers, P., Waterfield, J., Bal, A., Faux, M.T., Pall, S., Smith, E. (2013) Should community pharmacists record pharmaceutical care data associated with the use of antipsychotics during routine dispensing?. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (21) Supplement 2, 132 (Poster presentation at Royal Pharmaceutical Society Conference, September 2013)

Waterfield, J., & Dhir, A. (2011) An exploration of the views of community pharmacists on the relationship between Medicines Use Reviews (MURs) and public health. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (19) Supplement 2, 65 (Poster presentation at Royal Pharmaceutical Society Conference, September 2011)

Waterfield, J. and Patel, S. (2010) An investigation of the views of community pharmacists on the use of standard operating procedures for the dispensing process. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice. (18) Supplement 2, 60 (Poster presentation at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Conference, September 2010)

 Waterfield, J. and Mohammed, N. (2010) An investigation of the views of community pharmacists on their role as a public health practitioner. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (18): Supplement 1, 36 (Poster presentation at Health Services Research and Pharmacy Practice Conference, Manchester, 2010)

Waterfield, J. Patel, S. (2009) An investigation of the views of community pharmacists on the role of the accredited checking technician. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (17): Supplement 1, A9 (Oral presentation at Health Services Research and Pharmacy Practice Conference 2009, Brighton, 31st March, 2009)

Waterfield, J. Barot, N. (2009) Repeat Dispensing: The views of community pharmacists. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice (17); Supplement 2, A40 (Poster presentation at British Pharmaceutical Conference, Manchester, September, 2009) 

Jon-Waterfield

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