Dr Graham Lawson

Job: PL Forensic Analysis

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: Leicester School of Pharmacy

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 257 7129

E: glawson@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/hls

 

Personal profile

  • Low level chemical threat detection
  • Analysis of composition of historical artwork
  • Dried blood spot (DBS) analysis
  • Quantitative bioanalysis
  • LC-HRMS
  • LC-MS/MS
  • Medicine adherence
  • Therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Counterfeit drugs/medicines
  • Food safety.

Publications and outputs 

  • Non-adherence to cardiovascular pharmacotherapy in Iraq assessed using 8-items Morisky questionnaire and analysis of dried blood spot samples
    Non-adherence to cardiovascular pharmacotherapy in Iraq assessed using 8-items Morisky questionnaire and analysis of dried blood spot samples Alalaqi, Ahmed; Lawson, Graham; Obaid, Yaseen; Tanna, Sangeeta The study evaluated the non-adherence to selected cardiovascular medications, atenolol, atorvastatin, bisoprolol, diltiazem, lisinopril, simvastatin and valsartan in Iraqi patients by applying a standardized Morisky questionnaire (8-MMAS) and by measuring therapeutic drug concentrations in dried blood spots (DBS) analyzed by liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Sixty-nine patients, on continued use of one or more of the selected drugs, were evaluated. The questionnaire showed that 21.7% of participants were non-adherent whereas DBS analysis showed that 49.3% were non-adherent to their medications. No significant correlation between medication non-adherence and gender was detected, but adherence was negatively correlated with the number of medications in the regimen. The 8-items questionnaire was unable to differentiate non-adherence to multiple medications in the prescribed pharmacotherapy regimens. DBS is an alternative to conventional methods to monitor non-adherence objectively. Agreement between the two approaches was weak (Kappa =0.269, p-value 0.05). open access journal
  • Quantitative screening of the pharmaceutical ingredient for the rapid identification of substandard and falsified medicines using reflectance infrared spectroscopy
    Quantitative screening of the pharmaceutical ingredient for the rapid identification of substandard and falsified medicines using reflectance infrared spectroscopy Lawson, Graham; Ogwu, John; Tanna, Sangeeta The World Health Organization suggests that approximately 10% of medicines worldwide are either falsified or substandard with higher figures in low and middle income countries. Such poor quality medicines can seriously harm patients and pose a threat to the economy worldwide. This study investigates attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy as a simple and rapid method for determination of drug content in tablet dosage forms. Paracetamol was used as the model pharmaceutical ingredient. Spectra of standard mixtures of paracetamol with different excipients formed the basis for multivariate PLS based quantitative analysis of simulated tablet content using different selected infrared absorbance bands. Calibration methods using ATR-FTIR were compared with the ATR-FTIR and conventional ultraviolet spectroscopic analyses of real tablet samples and showed that the paracetamol/microcrystalline cellulose mixtures gave optimum results for all spectral bands tested. The quantitative data for band 1524-1493cm-1 was linear (R2 ˃ 0.98; LOQ ≥ 10%w/w tablet). Global examples of paracetamol tablets were tested using this protocol and 12% of the tablet samples examined was identified as substandard. Each sample analysis was completed in just a few minutes. ATR-FTIR can therefore be used in the rapid screening of tablet formulations. The simplicity of the proposed method makes it appropriate for use in low and middle income countries where analytical facilities are not available. open access journal
  • Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) coupled with high-resolution, accurate-mass (HRAM) mass spectrometry as a simplified alternative to dried blood spot (DBS) analysis for therapeutic drug monitoring of cardiovascular drugs
    Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) coupled with high-resolution, accurate-mass (HRAM) mass spectrometry as a simplified alternative to dried blood spot (DBS) analysis for therapeutic drug monitoring of cardiovascular drugs Tanna, Sangeeta; Alalaqi, Ahmed; Bernieh, Dennis; Lawson, Graham Here, volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS), used for the measurement of cardiovascular drugs, is compared against conventional dried blood spot (DBS) card sampling to evaluate adherence to prescribed medication. Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) is an attractive alternative to plasma sampling for routine drug monitoring and potentially overcomes haematocrit issues associated with quantitative bioanalysis of conventional dried blood spots. A quantitative VAMS-based LC-HRAM MS assay for atenolol, lisinopril, simvastatin and valsartan was developed and validated. The assay demonstrated acceptable linearity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, recovery and insignificant matrix effects with no impact of haematocrit on assay accuracy. Volunteers provided both VAMS and DBS 903 card samples (the current standard) to allow comparison of the two methods and demonstrate the potential utility of VAMS. Analysis of VAMS samples correctly identified drugs in volunteers known to be adherent, and found no false positives from volunteers known to be taking no medication. There was a strong correlation between the two sampling systems confirming the utility of VAMS. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) can assist clinicians in deciding how to proceed with treatment in the event of poor improvement in patient health. VAMS could offer a potentially more efficient method of sample collection, with fewer rejected samples than the DBS approach. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Blood spot micro-samples analysed by LC-HRMS to monitor cardiovascular drug levels in patient samples from Iraq.
    Blood spot micro-samples analysed by LC-HRMS to monitor cardiovascular drug levels in patient samples from Iraq. Tanna, Sangeeta; Alalaqi, Ahmed; Bernieh, Dennis; Obaid, Yaseen; Lawson, Graham
  • Cardiovascular drug monitoring using quantitative LC-HRMS analysis of self-collected micro-volume blood samples
    Cardiovascular drug monitoring using quantitative LC-HRMS analysis of self-collected micro-volume blood samples Tanna, Sangeeta; Bernieh, Dennis; Alalaqi, Ahmed; Lawson, Graham Background Evidence suggests that ˃50% of cardiovascular (CVD) disease patients do not adhere to treatment thus impacting on patient health, additional healthcare costs and medicines wastage. DBS microsampling combined with LC-ToF MS detection has the potential to offer a simple means to monitor drug levels to enable clinicians to personalise optimum treatment for patients. This research compared the use of Whatman 903 dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection cards with volumetric absorptive micro-sampling (VAMS)/Mitra® technology for use as a personal sampling methodology. Methods Recruited volunteers were given demonstrations and information sheets concerning the investigation and sample collection. A liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was validated for the determination of the top 11 UK prescribed cardiovascular drugs. For the preparation of DBS and VAMS calibration samples whole blood was spiked with different levels of the 11 target analytes. 8mm DBS discs or the absorptive VAMS tips were extracted with methanol containing the internal standard. The bioanalytical method was applied to fingerprick samples taken from volunteers some of whom were prescribed one or more of the target drugs. Volunteers not prescribed drugs represented blank samples. Results Approximately 17% of the DBS spots were unacceptable for quantification whereas 1 VAMS sample tip was rejected due to incomplete collection. Validation showed comparable quantitative results between the DBS and VAMS microsampling methods for the 11 target drugs. For two study groups anticipated cardiovascular drugs were detected in 83% of the pre-warned group and 73% of the trial group. The latter figure was higher than expected possibly due to the ‘white coat compliance’. The detected drug levels were in line with literature values for the half-life and Cmax for a given drug, Non-adherence was not uniform amongst the cardiovascular drugs. All volunteers preferred the VAMS methodology. Conclusions Both microsampling methods coupled with LC-HRMS analyses facilitate the identification of patients where the prescription apparently failed to produce detectable drug levels in the blood. This information should inform clinicians how to proceed in the healthcare process in the event of poor patient progress.
  • Comparison of VAMS and card based microsampling with LC-HRMS analysis to assess cardiovascular drug levels
    Comparison of VAMS and card based microsampling with LC-HRMS analysis to assess cardiovascular drug levels Bernieh, Dennis; Lawson, Graham; Tanna, Sangeeta Summary: An objective means of assessing medication adherence is needed to enable patients get the maximum therapeutic benefits from their medication. A bioanalytical assay using dried blood spot (DBS) and volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMs) followed by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) analyses was developed and validated for quantification of 11 commonly UK prescribed cardiovascular drugs. Results from the two sampling devices showed that VAMs overcomes the limitations associated with using DBS cards for quantitative analyses. Introduction: Evidence suggests that ˃50% of heart disease patients do not adhere to treatment. This means half of the 370 million prescriptions dispensed for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the UK yearly, are wasted [1]. Wasted (unused) medicines cost the NHS up to £4 billion annually. Treatment success is also affected by variations in individual drug metabolism, drug-drug interactions and selecting appropriate dosage. Dried matrix microsampling combined with LC-HRMS detection has the potential to offer an objective means of assessing medication adherence [1, 2] to enable clinicians to optimise and personalise treatment for patients. However challenges in using DBS hampers the attractiveness of this technique. Novel microsamplers have been developed to overcome the limitations with DBS cards when a sub punch is used. This work compares the performance of the novel VAMs device and the traditional DBS card in terms of quantification for 11 cardiovascular drugs in a medication adherence study. Method: Chromatographic analyses were performed on a Zorbax column using gradient elution with a run time of 2.5 min. Identification was carried out using electrospray ionisation (positive) on an Agilent 6530A QTOF mass spectrometer. For the preparation of DBS calibration samples whole blood was spiked with the 11 target analytes to produce 30µl blood spots on specimen cards and dried. 8mm discs were punched out from DBS cards and the whole substrate was used for VAMs. Spots were extracted with methanol containing the internal standard. The developed and validated bioanalytical method was applied to finger prick blood samples taken from adult patients previously administered one or more of the target drugs. Results: The method validation showed good linearity. The accuracy (relative error) and precision (coefficient of variation) values were within the pre-defined limits of ≤15% at all tested concentrations for the 11 target drugs on both sampling devices. Haematocrit effect were significant on DBS card, but not on the VAMs device. Drug recoveries from spiked blood spots were ≥62% for amlodipine and simvastatin and ≥82% for the other target drugs. The assay sensitivity was sufficient to detect the drop in blood concentration, for all target drugs, resulting from missed doses. Conclusion: Ease of sampling data collected from participants’ show that VAMs devices was more user friendly compared to the DBS card. The developed microsampling based LC-HRMS assay has the potential to both assess medication adherence and to allow re-interrogation of the HRMS data collected for heart disease patients. This will enable health practitioners to monitor medication adherence. The method has potential to save the NHS money in wasted medicines and will allow health practitioners to personalize and optimize drug treatments for their patients.
  • Counterfeit or just poor quality?
    Counterfeit or just poor quality? Armitage, Rachel; Lawson, Graham; Tanna, Sangeeta Counterfeit medicines are a major public health issue. The World Health Organisation suggests that the occurrence of counterfeits range from 1% in high income countries to as much as ~30-40% in low to middle income countries, however many of these may be substandard rather than counterfeit due to poor quality control. This research investigates the potential of Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FTIR) techniques to provide rapid quantitative analysis of suspect tablet formulations. Sample preparation for ATR FTIR is minimal and only requires a single tablet to be ground to a fine powder prior to analysis. This enables more rapid analysis of tablets. Reference spectra of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and excipients were recorded for identification purposes. Using atenolol as a model, quantitative data was obtained from calibrated mixtures of API and excipients. Tablets from various countries, India, Saudi Arabia, Nepal and UK were analysed using both ATR FTIR and reference UV analyses. Results demonstrated that the API was detectable down to ca 5% w/w of the tablet. Several examples of poor dosage quality control were identified.
  • Performance of two different microsamplers for the LC-HRMS analysis of 10 cardiovascular drugs
    Performance of two different microsamplers for the LC-HRMS analysis of 10 cardiovascular drugs Bernieh, Dennis; Lawson, Graham; Tanna, Sangeeta Introduction: Evidence suggests that ˃50% of heart disease patients do not adhere to treatment. This means half of the 370 million prescriptions dispensed for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the UK yearly, are wasted [1]. Wasted (unused) medicines cost the NHS up to £4 billion annually. Treatment success is also affected by variations in individual drug metabolism, drug-drug interactions and selecting appropriate dosage. Dried matrix microsampling combined with LC-HRMS detection has the potential to offer an objective means of assessing medication adherence [1, 2] to enable clinicians to optimise and personalise treatment for patients. However challenges in using DBS hampers the attractiveness of this technique. Novel microsamplers have been developed to overcome the limitations with DBS cards when a sub punch is used. This work compares the performance of the novel volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) device and the traditional DBS card in terms of quantification for 11 cardiovascular drugs in a medication adherence study. Method: Chromatographic analyses were performed on a Zorbax column using gradient elution with a run time of 2.5 min. Identification was carried out using electrospray ionisation (positive) on an Agilent 6530A QTOF mass spectrometer. For the preparation of DBS calibration samples whole blood was spiked with the 11 target analytes to produce 30µl blood spots on specimen cards and dried. 8mm discs were punched out from DBS cards and the whole substrate was used for VAMs. Spots were extracted with methanol containing the internal standard. The developed and validated bioanalytical method was applied to finger prick blood samples taken from adult patients previously administered one or more of the target drugs. Results: The method validation showed good linearity. The accuracy (relative error) and precision (coefficient of variation) values were within the pre-defined limits of ≤15% at all tested concentrations for the 11 target drugs on both sampling devices. Haematocrit effect were significant on DBS card, but not on the VAMs device. Drug recoveries from spiked blood spots were ≥62% for amlodipine and simvastatin and ≥82% for the other target drugs. The assay sensitivity was sufficient to detect the drop in blood concentration, for all target drugs, resulting from missed doses. Conclusion: Ease of sampling data collected from participants’ show that VAMs devices was more user friendly compared to the DBS card. The developed microsampling based LC-HRMS assay has the potential to both assess medication adherence and to allow re-interrogation of the HRMS data collected for heart disease patients. This will enable health practitioners to monitor medication adherence. The method has potential to save the NHS money in wasted medicines and will allow health practitioners to personalize and optimize drug treatments for their patients.
  • Quantitative LC-HRMS determination of selected cardiovascular drugs, in dried blood spots, as an indicator of adherence to medication
    Quantitative LC-HRMS determination of selected cardiovascular drugs, in dried blood spots, as an indicator of adherence to medication Bernieh, Dennis; Lawson, Graham; Tanna, Sangeeta Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling was investigated as a means of obtaining micro-volume blood samples for the quantitative analyses of ten commonly UK prescribed cardiovascular drugs as an indicator of medication adherence. An 8 mm disc was punched out from each DBS from calibration, quality control and volunteer samples and extracted using methanol containing the internal standard. Each extract was evaporated to dryness, the residue reconstituted in methanol:water (40:60 v/v) containing 0.1% formic acid and analysed by LC-HRMS. Chromatography was performed using gradient elution on a Zorbax Eclipse C18 HD 100 mmx2.1 mm, 1.8 µm pore size column with the column oven temperature at 40˚C. Flow rate of the mobile phase was 0.6ml/min with a run time of 2.5 min. Electrospray positive ionization was used for MS detection. Drug recoveries from spiked blood spots were 68% for simvastatin and ≥ 87% for all other target drugs. Compound specificity was obtained operating the MS with a 5ppm mass window. The LC-HRMS method was validated, with results for accuracy and precision within acceptable limits; analytes were stable at room temperature for at least 10 weeks and different blood spot volumes and haematocrit values had no significant effect. The LC-HRMS assay was used to analyse DBS samples from volunteers, some of whom were prescribed one or more of the target drugs. In results from 37 volunteers the assay successfully identified volunteers who were known to be either adherent or nonadherent; confirmed the correct drug/drugs for multiple prescriptions; demonstrated no false positives from other cardiovascular drugs; revealed several examples of unsuspected non-adherence. These results indicated that the developed assay was suitable for trials with patients. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • LC-HRMS analysis of 133 patient micro-volume blood samples to allow clinical assessment of medication adherence
    LC-HRMS analysis of 133 patient micro-volume blood samples to allow clinical assessment of medication adherence Tanna, Sangeeta; Alalaqi, Ahmed; Bernieh, Dennis; Lawson, Graham 133 DBS card/VAMS micro-volume blood samples were analysed by LC-HRMS to determine if therapeutic levels of the prescribed cardiovascular (CVD) drugs were present. This research focussed on the top 11 UK prescribed CVD drugs. Calibration samples, prepared from spiked human whole blood, were extracted and analysed by LC-HRMS. This method was validated and applied to volunteer and patient samples. The system successfully identified the prescribed drugs in volunteer’s samples who were known to be adherent. Non-detection of a prescribed drug indicated non-adherence to prescription: a situation identified for 12% of the volunteers and 36% of the patients.

Click here for a full listing of Graham Lawson's publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Application of instrumental techniques to low level detection principally concerning threats to health, eg patients, workers or the general public
  • Neonatal patient care based on dry blood spot analysis
  • Investigation / detection of counterfeit pharmaceutical products
  • Security applications of selected detection systems
  • Safety of plastic packaging in food and pharmaceutical applications
  • Forensic investigations of historical paintings particularly post Byzantine icons
  • Work extended to include applications to the history and conservation of works of art
  • Dried blood spot (analysis)
  • LC-HRMS
  • Therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Food additive exposure assessment
  • Medicine adherence assessment
  • Contaminant migration into food
  • Paediatric biomarkers
  • Paediatric pharmacokinetics
  • Counterfeit products medicines, drugs and food.

Areas of teaching

  • Instrumental Analytical Forensic Science
  • Gas chromatography mass spectrometry
  • chromatography mass spectrometry
  • LC-MS/MS
  • SPE applied to the above areas
  • Identification of counterfeit products: medicines, foods and other consumer items.

Qualifications

BSc (Hons) PhD

Courses taught

BSc Forensic Science

Honours and awards

Nominated for Times Higher Education (THE) Research Project of the Year 2012
Blood Spot Analysis.
Tanna S and Lawson G
November 2012

Royal Society of Chemistry – Analytical Methods Prize 2010
Analysis of dried blood spots – the potential for paediatric pharmacokinetic studies of captopril.
Tanna S, Pandya H, Mulla H, Titman C, and Lawson G.
RSC Analytical Research Forum. Loughborough University. 26-28 July 2010

British Pharmaceutical Conference 2009 – Science Poster Prize
The use of blood spot analysis in paediatric care - From laboratory to bedside and back again.
Lawson G, Pandya H, Mulla H and Tanna S
Science @ BPC2009 Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Manchester Central. Sept 7-9 2009.

Membership of professional associations and societies

Royal Society of Chemistry. 2010 - Ordinary Member.

Conference attendance

Invited Lectures

Tanna S and Lawson G. (2013) Cardiovascular drug medication compliance assessed by dried blood spot sampling techniques. Invited lecture at the 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Analytical Techniques. Las Vegas, USA 15-17 October 2013 Journal of Analytical and Bioanalytical Techniques, 4 (5): 51

Lawson G, Armitage R, Alhedethe A and Tanna S. (2013) Rapid identification of counterfeit pills by ATR FT/IR analysis of crushed samples. Invited lecture at the 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Analytical Techniques. Las Vegas, USA 15-17 October 2013 Journal of Analytical and Bioanalytical Techniques, 4 (5): 50

Tanna S and Lawson G. (2013) Blood Spot Analysis – Paediatrics to Pensioners. Invited public lecture at the Festival of Ideas, De Montfort University, Leicester UK, 23 April 2013

Lawson G, Armitage R and Tanna S. (2012) Identification of Counterfeit Drugs. Invited public lecture at the Cafe Scientifique event, Nanjing, China, November 2012

Tanna S and Lawson G. (2012) Dried Blood Spot (DBS) Analysis for Healthcare Applications. Invited public lecture at the Cafe Scientific event, Nanjing, China, November 2012

Lawson G, Armitage R and Tanna S. (2012) Identification of counterfeit medicines. Invited Lecture. 7th Annual Pharmaceutical Anti-Counterfeiting Meeting. 2012, Visiongain Conference Centre, Barbican, London, UK. 26-27 June 2012.

Lawson G, Armitage R and Tanna S (2012) Identification of counterfeit medicines. Invited Lecture. Conference on International Biology and Medicine Innovative Industrialization (IBMII). Chongqing Convention Centre, Chongqing, China, April 2012.

Tanna S. and Lawson G. (2012) Dried blood spot (DBS) analysis for healthcare applications. Invited Lecture. Conference of International Biology and Medicine Innovative Industrialization (IBMII). Chongqing Convention Centre, Chongqing, China, April 2012

Lawson G, Ross G, Sage A, Mulla H, Pandya H and Tanna S. (2010) Potential of the QToF in Paediatric Biomarking. Invited Lecture. 1st International Pediatric Biomarker Symposium. Congress Park, Igls Austria. 4-6 Feb 2010

Invited Poster Presentations

Tanna S, Patel P, Mulla H and Lawson G. (2010) Dried blood spot analysis – a comparison of SIM, MSMS and accurate mass TOF analyses for selected drugs. 27th LC-MS Montreux Symposium, Montreux, Switzerland, 10-12 November 2010

Tanna S, Pandya H, Mulla H, Titman C, and Lawson G. (2010) Analysis of dried blood spots – the potential for paediatric pharmacokinetic studies of captopril. RSC Analytical Research Forum. Loughborough University. 26-28 July 2010

Lawson G, Mulla H, Ross G, Sage A and Tanna S. (2010) Accurate mass versus tandem mass measurement of paediatric biomarkers. RSC Analytical Research Forum. Loughborough University. 26-28 July 2010

Tanna S, Pandya H, Mulla H, Titman C, and Lawson G. (2010) Analysis of dried blood spots – the potential for paediatric pharmacokinetic studies of captopril. 1st

International Pediatric Biomarker Symposium. Congresspark. Igls, Austria. 4-6 Feb 2010.

Poster Presentations

Tanna S, Armitage R, Lawson G. (2013) Identification of counterfeit pills - Is rapid instrumental analysis possible? Proceedings of The 24th International Symposium on Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis. Bologna, Italy. 30 June-3 July 2013

Lawson G, Cocks E. and Tanna S. (2013) Liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry applied to therapeutic drug monitoring using DBS sampling. Proceedings of The 24th International Symposium on Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis. Bologna, Italy. 30 June-3 July 2013.

Tanna S, Cocks E. and Lawson G. (2013) Is the patient taking their 'heart' pills? A dried blood spot sample - LC-HRMS assay. Proceedings of The 24th International Symposium on Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis. Bologna, Italy. 30 June-3 July 2013

Tanna S, Patel P, Mulla H. and Lawson G. (2011) Dried blood spot analysis to improve paediatric medication. Separation Science Asia. Singapore. 27-28 July 2011

Lawson G, Cocks E. and Tanna S. (2011) High resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of dried blood spots. Separation Science Asia. Singapore, 27-28 July 2011

Patel P, Pandya H, Spooner N, Della Pasque O, Gade S, Kairamknoda V, Lawson G, Tanna S, Mulla H. (2011) Dried blood spots and sparse sampling: A perfect combination for minimally invasive PK/PD studies in children. Population Approach Group Europe (PAGE) Meeting, Athens, Greece, June 2011

Tanna S, Cocks E and Lawson G. (2011) High resolution mass spectrometry for analysis of selected drugs in dried blood spots. 59th Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics ASMS Meeting, Denver, Colorado, USA 5 – 9 June 2011

Lawson G, Mulla H, Patel P and Tanna S. (2011) Examples of dried blood spot sampling and analysis to improve paediatric medicine. 59th Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics. ASMS Meeting, Denver, Colorado, USA 5-9 June 2011

Patel P, Lawson G, Tanna S, Mulla H. (2009) Facilitating paediatric PK studies: utility of the dried blood spot. Pharmacokinetics UK Conference, Birmingham UK, November 2009

Patel P, Lawson G, Mulla H and Tanna S. (2009) Applying dried blood spot analysis: the pathway to better paediatric care. Science @ BPC2009 Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Manchester Central, UK September 7-9 2009.

Lawson G, Pandya H, Mulla H and Tanna S. (2009) The use of blood spot analysis in paediatric care - From laboratory to bedside and back again. Science @ BPC2009 Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Manchester Central, UK. September 7-9 2009.

Lawson G, Coffey J, Titman C and Tanna S. (2009) Dried blood spot analyses by Ion Trap – Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, the potential for improved child care? 18th Intl Mass Spectrometry Conference, PWA 427, Bremen, Germany Aug 30 – Sept 4 2009

Lawson G, Patel, P and Tanna S. The use of dried blood spot analysis in paediatric care – how mass spectrometry can direct child medication. 18th Intl Mass Spectrometry Conference, PMM 468, Bremen, Germany Aug 30 – Sept 4 2009

Tanna S, Lawson G Mulla H and Pandya H From laboratory to bedside and back again – The use of blood spot analysis in paediatric care. ACCP/ESCP International Congress on Clinical Pharmacy. Orange County Convention Centre, Orlando, Fl. USA. April 24 -28th.2009.

Key research outputs

  • Lawson,G, Cocks,E, Tanna,S. Determination of atenolol in dried blood spot samples by LC-HRMS: A potential method for assessing medication adherence. Journal of Chromatography B 2012; Manuscript accepted for publication
  • Lawson,G, Mulla,H, Tanna,S. Preliminary investigation of captopril in dried blood spots with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: A potential method for neonatal pharmacokinetic studies. Journal of Bioanalysis and Biomedicine 2012; Manuscript in press
  • Tanna,S, Lawson,G. Analytical methods used in conjunction with dried blood spots. Analytical Methods 2011; 3(8): 1709-1718
  • Mulla,H, Hussain,N, Tanna,S, Lawson,G, Manktelow,B N, Tuleu,C, Samani,
    N J, Pandy,H. Assessment of liquid captopril formulations used in children. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2011; 96(3): 293-296
  • Taylor,M J, Tanna,S, Sahota,T. In vivo study of a polymeric glucose sensitive insulin delivery system using a rat model. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 2010; 99(10): 4215-4227
  • Patel,P, Tanna,S, Mulla,H, Kairamkonda,V, Pandya,H, Lawson,G. Dexamethasone quantification in dried blood spot samples using LC-MS: The potential for application to neonatal pharmacokinetic studies. Journal of Chromatography B 2010; 878: 3277-3282
  • Lawson,G, Anthony,D A and Crawford,D. The theory practice gap: ECMO research example. Paediatric Nursing 2008. 20(1): 41 – 45
  • Lawson,G, Jarvis,I, Flemming,M, Ramsden,D, Healey,M, Prior,T, Benton,D, Ing,H, Chamberland,M, Huttunen,J, Ratajczak,P, de Miscault,J-C, Roa,V, Andrews,R, Inrig,L, Bartosz,E and Carter,J. Final Report NATO UNCLASSIFIED – PFP(NIAG)D(2008)0002. NIAG SG112 – Stand-off Detection Technologies for Radiological Threats. 2008

Recent national media coverage of DBS research conducted by Sangeeta Tanna and Graham Lawson
The pioneering use of dried blood spot methods to monitor prescription compliance among patients taking cardiovascular medications was the subject of media coverage in September 2011. This included television coverage on BBC national and local news in addition to a live BBC Radio Leicester interview. 

DBS research on front cover of international journal, Analytical Methods

The front cover of the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) journal – Analytical Methods (Vol 3: Issue 8 August 2011) is devoted to the research of Sangeeta Tanna and Graham Lawson into the benefits that can be derived from the analysis of dried blood spots (DBS). This is now referred to by the RSC as ‘The Happy Cover’.

Current research students

4 PhD students

Externally funded research grants information

  • Stand off detection techniques for residual radiation. 2007/8 Contract value £18,000.
  • NATO Advanced studies research group. NIAG, UK Expert in Low level radiation detection.
  • Collaborators from NATO Industry and Military.
  • Micro analytical techniques for PK studies in infants. 2007- 9. £69,800. CI (with Dr S. Tanna PI) .
  • NHS NEAT (now i4i) Funding Investigation of dried blood spot analysis for child medicine applications. 2008-2011 UHL NHS Trust consumables funding . £21,000.
  • Assessment of liquid captopril formulations used in children. 2008-9 NHS Research for Patient Benefit Funding. Joint research with UHL NHS Trust. Role CI with Dr S Tanna. Collaborators UHL NHS Trust.
  • NIAG SG112 – Stand-off Detection Technologies for Radiological Threats. 1 April 2008.

Internally funded research project information

  • Investigation of dried blood spot analysis for paediatric clinical applications. DMU PhD Student Bursary PI and Ist supervisor. Collaborators UHL NHS Trust, Sheffield Children’s Hospital, GSK plc. 2008-2011.Contract £40,500.
  • Tandem Mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots. 2010-2013 Contract £296,000. Role PI (with Dr S Tanna CI) DMU RIF Funded.
  • Tandem Mass Spectrometry Project. Contract £30,000. Role PI (with Dr S Tanna CI) DMU HEIF Funded.

Case studies

 

1.The blood spot analysis research and its potential impact on improving healthcare received extensive media coverage during a British Council sponsored visit to Chongqing, China in April 2012. It was widely covered by 20 national and local media, including CCTV, Chongqing TV, Xinhua News Agency, Guang Ming Daily People’s Daily, HongKong Wenhui Po, people.com.cn, CQ.QQ.com etc. The link below is Chongqing TV’s coverage of the event at its satellite news programme.
http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMzg3Nzg2OTk2.html

2. In September 2011 the pioneering use of dried blood spot methods to monitor prescription compliance among patients taking cardiovascular medications was the subject of local and national media coverage. This included television coverage on BBC national and local news in addition to a live BBC Radio Leicester interview. It was featured on the BBC news website at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-15002237

3. The following was published in the Leicester Mercury of Saturday, August 21, 2010:
http://www.thisisleicestershire.co.uk/news/Baby-test-team-win-award/article-2552713-detail/article.html

Baby test team win top award

A test pioneered by De Montfort University experts, which could help improve care and treatment of sick newborn babies, has won a top award.

The Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Methods Prize 2010 was awarded to Dr Sangeeta Tanna and Dr Graham Lawson for their work.

The test measures how much of a drug is in a baby's blood from a single drop and will allow medics to treat them more effectively.

It could help revolutionise how drugs are used to treat critically-ill newborn babies.

Graham Lawson

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