Dr Diane Wildbur

Job: Senior Lecturer

Faculty: Health and Life Sciences

School/department: School of Applied Social Sciences

Address: De Montfort, University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH.

T: +44 (0)116 207 8804

E: dwildbur@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/hls

 

Personal profile

Dr Wildbur is the Programme Director for the MSc in Psychological Well-being, and is a Chartered Psychologist. She has particular interest and expertise in quantitative research methods and data analysis and she teaches both at under- and post-graduate levels on the Psychology and the Speech and Language Training programmes.

Dr Wildbur's current research interests include the psychological well-being of university students and also of older people. She also has an interest in health matters, and has served on Primary Care Trust Boards and worked within the voluntary sector.

Publications and outputs 

  • Self-disgust within eating disordered groups: Associations with anxiety, disgust sensitivity and sensory processing.
    Self-disgust within eating disordered groups: Associations with anxiety, disgust sensitivity and sensory processing. Bell, Katie; Coulthard, Helen; Wildbur, D. J. This study aimed to assess the relationship between self-disgust and sensory processing within eating psychopathology. Five hundred and ninety one women with a self-reported diagnosis of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or who had no previous history of an eating disorder completed a battery of on-line questionnaires measuring disgust, emotion and sensory variables. Those with an eating disorder reported significantly higher rates of self-disgust than those with no history of disordered eating. In groups of women with self-reported bulimia, self-disgust was associated with sensation avoidance and sensation seeking. Within the group with anorexia nervosa, self-disgust was associated with low registration and sensation seeking. This report is the first to examine the expression of the emotion self-disgust within eating psychopathology and examine associations of this factor with sensory processing. The emotion self-disgust needs to be further examined to understand its possible role in the onset and maintenance of disordered eating. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Benefits to University students through volunteering in a health context: A new model
    Benefits to University students through volunteering in a health context: A new model Williamson, I. R.; Wildbur, D. J.; Bell, Katie; Tanner, J.; Matthews, Hannah Individual interviews explored 50 British University students’ accounts of sustained volunteering within health settings and a model was developed using grounded theory. Phase one - 'Getting involved' outlines 'motives and catalysts' for students starting to volunteer wherein altruistic motives of compassion for others are juxtaposed with perceptions of enhanced employability. Phase two - 'Maintaining commitment' includes three components ('Making connections' 'Developing resilience' and 'Keeping the balance'), which represent important aspects of continuing volunteering participation. Phase three - 'Reaping the rewards' focuses on the benefits of volunteering including self-development. Our findings have implications for the training and support of student volunteers The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • ‘A prisoner of the self’: A thematic analysis exploring the reasons for reduced engagement in sport and exercise activities among female undergraduates
    ‘A prisoner of the self’: A thematic analysis exploring the reasons for reduced engagement in sport and exercise activities among female undergraduates McKinlay, E.; Wildbur, D. J. Objectives: Despite the positive effects of sport/exercise participation on well-being, engagement in these activities among female undergraduates decreases during the period of their studies. The study adopted a qualitative approach to explore the reasons for such decline and potential effects on well-being. Design: Semi-structured interviews were employed, consisting of a series of open questions, permitting flexibility and in-depth discussion. Methods: Participants were a purposive sample of 12 female university students aged between 18-25 years, studying at a British University. Participants had not engaged in sport or exercise activities for at least six weeks prior to interview. Using thematic analysis, four super-ordinate themes emerged, capturing key contributors to the reductions in sport/ exercise behaviours among female undergraduates. Results: Theme One - ‘You are your own worst enemy’ focuses on the cognitions that disable female sport/exercise participation. Theme Two – ‘The Social Spectrum’ captures a contradiction between senses of social isolation vs. support in male-dominated sporting/exercise environments. Theme Three - ‘Man, I feel like a woman’ explores the societal demands experienced by young women to maintain their physical femininity, whilst pursuing activities that might jeopardise this. Finally, Theme Four - ‘Coming of age’ focuses on how emergent responsibilities in the context of university life temporarily over-ride the priority of sport/exercise participation. Conclusions: The findings provide valuable insight into the inter-related reasons for declines in sport/exercise participation among a sample of female university students. We discuss our findings in terms of their implications for national campaigns and universities promoting such participation as key to psychological well-being.
  • "Running alone can be a race": An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the experiences of amateur runners who use wrist-based technology
    "Running alone can be a race": An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the experiences of amateur runners who use wrist-based technology Richmond, S.; Wildbur, D. J. Objectives: The study explored the experiences of runners who use wrist-based technology, their motives for maintaining running and any role of the technology in that maintenance. Design: The study utilised a qualitative, phenomenological approach in the form of semi-structured interviews, facilitating in-depth discussion and flexibility. Participants were additionally invited to supplement their verbal data with self-captured visual images. Methods: Participants were a purposive sample of ten participants, who were regular runners and users of wrist-based technology. Verbal data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), with visual images used to highlight key experiences. Results: Emergent themes are presented as elements of a three-element, dynamic model in which each element captures beneficial and potentially negative effects of technology on the experience and maintenance of running. Element 1 outlines the role of technology of ‘Reifying running through data capture.’ Element 2 ‘Setting targets and achieving goals’ reflects the importance of motivation and goals setting in the maintenance of running and the subsequent confirmation of success afforded by technology. Element 3 ‘Enablement of competition’ focuses on the function of technology in facilitating self-comparison and comparison to others. Each element of the model contributes to the maintenance of running by providing focus and purpose. However, potentially negative effects of technology use on well-being were also identified within and across elements, including obsessive behaviour and over-exertion. Conclusions: The findings provide insight into the previously unexplored experiences of runners who use wrist-based technology. However, they also have implications for both users and technology developers, in discouraging negative effects on well-being.
  • Combining photographs with interviews in the context of phenomenological research around chronic illness: An evaluation.
    Combining photographs with interviews in the context of phenomenological research around chronic illness: An evaluation. Quincey, Kerry; Papaloukas, P.; Williamson, I. R.; Fish, Julie; Wildbur, D. J. Background: Health psychologists’ adoption of contemporary qualitative research methodologies in recent times has enabled the rise of multiple integrative approaches applicable to the study of long-term conditions. Synthesis of visual and verbal qualitative methods simultaneously presents both potential opportunities and challenges, for the researcher and the researched. Drawing on our experiences of two research studies, both of which explore lived experiences of chronic illnesses in marginalised populations from a critical health psychology perspective, we consider some of the advantages and potential pitfalls of fusing qualitative methodologies. Methods: Both studies combine the collection and analysis of verbal and visual data; phenomenologically oriented semi-structured interviews together with photographs authored by participants themselves. One study focuses on 16 LGBT persons living with multiple sclerosis, while the second investigates 31 British men’s lived experiences of breast cancer. The visual component is informed by Photovoice methodology. All data are analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Findings: Combining the verbal and visual data forms has presented several challenges in both research studies, including epistemological, practical and ethical issues, concerns around ‘methodolatry’, participant comfort and engagement, and best practice for analysing the data. Despite such challenges, our experiences show methodological synergy is both possible and advantageous; allowing for richer understandings by enabling participants to ‘give voice’ beyond talk. Discussion: We discuss some of the benefits and shortcomings of combining verbal and visual data when investigating chronic illnesses. We conclude with recommendations for how qualitative health psychologists might further refine integrative approaches which combine verbal and visual data.
  • Men and breast cancer: what do we know and what do we need to do differently?
    Men and breast cancer: what do we know and what do we need to do differently? Quincey, Kerry; Shokuhi, S.; Williamson, I. R.; Appleton, D.; Wildbur, D. J. Rare, under-researched and underfunded, breast cancer in men is frequently overlooked within health and care systems. Increased prevalence and sustained professional and public interest in breast cancer in women has led to pervasive feminisation of the disease and related clinical practices, posing important ramifications for male patient-survivors. Our research adopts a critical health psychology perspective and is two-fold: (1) an international qualitative synthesis of 8 existing studies looking at men's experiences of breast cancer; (2) an on-going study which involves collecting both verbal and photographic data from 31 British men who have experienced breast cancer. Integrating and triangulating the findings from the two study phases, we reveal how the marginalisation of men across the illness trajectory impinges on the male breast cancer experience and men's adjustment to the illness. Findings from the qualitative synthesis demonstrate how current approaches to breast cancer care and advocacy serve to isolate men who develop the disease, potentially alienating and emasculating them. Patient management practices and information resources intended for breast cancer patients unequivocally marginalise men. Preliminary findings from our work-in-progress confirm these earlier findings and further illuminate the difficulties encountered by male patient-survivors on the periphery of optimal psychosocial care and support. We expand on ideas surrounding stigma, masculinities and marginalisation relating to breast cancer in men, and conclude with recommendations for advocacy and intervention for improved future care and breast cancer practices.
  • A Q-method investigation of individual value priorities in subjective well-being: understanding what makes well-being matter.
    A Q-method investigation of individual value priorities in subjective well-being: understanding what makes well-being matter. Drayton, C. M.; Wildbur, D. J. Objectives: The current investigation aimed to inform theory by exploring the question: How do individual value-priorities influence participants’ constructions of personal well-being? Design: The study employed Q Methodology, which assembles a comprehensive concourse of literature-informed viewpoints, operationalised as numbered qualitative statements for objective quantitative analysis. Q Method provided the ability to operationalise and integrate complex subjective values, facilitating subsequent interpretative analysis of how values influence subjective well-being. Methods: An opportunity sample of 30 participants (12 male, 18 female; 19-66 years), ranked 60 value statements according to subjective importance on a 13-point forced choice distribution grid ranging from -6 (most unimportant) to +6 (most important). Data were subjected to factor analysis and factor extraction using principle component analysis with Varimax rotation. Data sets loading on separate factors with an Eigenvalue of .06 or above were merged to form holistic factor arrays, each subjected to holistic interpretive analyses. Results: Thirteen participants (8 male 5 female), loaded significantly on five factors, (factors 1,2 and 3; three loadings), (factors 4 and 5; two loadings), accounting for 53% of the sample variance. Holistic analyses identified five themes: Exploring Life through my Choices; Faith Family Acceptance and Balance; Keeping Family Close and Embracing Life; Finding Positive Meaning in the World; Being True to Myself and Defining my Boundaries. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate that individual values have a significant influence on subsequent development of subjective constructs of personal well-being. These constructs do not conform to components associated with one distinct domain of well-being, but incorporate dynamic, interactive components from multiple domains.
  • Affective attributions for psychological well-being: Pre-existing biases predict attributions of control, responsibility and credit.
    Affective attributions for psychological well-being: Pre-existing biases predict attributions of control, responsibility and credit. Sparks, E.; Wildbur, D. J. Objectives: Previous research has identified a hierarchy of attributions for negative but preventable health outcomes (e.g. HIV/AIDS), from control, through responsibility, to blame, which becomes increasingly reliant upon subjective biases. This study investigated whether attributions of control, responsibility and credit for a positive outcome followed a comparably influenced systematic sequence. Design: A vignette-based questionnaire design was implemented. Primary outcome variables were scores on measures of attributions of control, responsibility and credit in response to the positive outcome described in a vignette. Additional variables were measured in order to investigate the reliance of attributions on pre-existing affective, behavioural, and attitudinal biases. Methods: Following their reading of a vignette describing an active pursuit of well-being, a self-selected sample of 144 adults completed online questionnaires measuring attributions of control, responsibility and credit. Measures of happiness, social acceptance, behaviour change, mental health locus of control, and just world beliefs were also completed. Results: Attributions of credit were significantly greater than those of control (p<.001) or responsibility (p<.001), whereas control and responsibility did not differ significantly. Happiness and mental health locus of control uniquely predicted attributions of control (ps<.05) and responsibility (ps<.005), whereas happiness (p=.002) and behaviour change (p=.049) uniquely predicted attributions of credit. Although a hierarchy for positive attributions was evidenced, findings suggest that biases, which deviate from systematic cognitive processing, are inherent to attributional reasoning. Conclusions: Future research is warranted to advance theories of positive attribution processes, with anticipated research impact for informing public policy and promoting observable behaviours that characterise psychological well-being.
  • The Effects of Time-Perspective and Balanced-Time-Perspective on the Success, Psychological Health and Well-Being of Students
    The Effects of Time-Perspective and Balanced-Time-Perspective on the Success, Psychological Health and Well-Being of Students Wildbur, D. J.; Griffin, Edward Objectives: The student experience is a unique journey of challenge and opportunity, for which their success, subjective well-being (SWB) and psychological health are key elements. This research programme examined the effects of Time-Perspective (TP: An individual’s psychological relationship with time) on these outcomes. Design: A QUAN-qual mixed-methods approach was used. This included a longitudinal investigation examining the effects of TP on the success (academic and non-academic), psychological health and SWB of students in higher education. A follow-up interview study with a small number of these participants explored the areas in greater depth. Methods: Year-1 undergraduates (N=146), were recruited via a student research forum at the university. Demographic and questionnaire data pertaining to success, psychological health and SWB were collected using SurveyMonkey at three time-points throughout Year-1. Quantitative data were analysed in SPSS. Interview data from six participants with contrasting profiles were analysed using IPA. Results: Future, Past-Positive and Balanced-Time-Perspective (BTP) were predictive of SWB, academic and non-academic success. Psychological problems were associated with, and predicted by a bias towards Past-Negative and Present-Fatalist orientations. Those interviewed talked about their experiences of psychological ill-health, success and SWB. A good work/life balance, positive future goals and resilience to set-backs appeared to accompany a BTP. Conclusions: TP offers valuable understandings of the student experience, adding value in academic, practical and theoretical contexts. This research indicated that interventions focused on TP modification (i.e. developing a BTP) may potentially offer preventative mental-illness strategies for susceptible students and enhance their success and SWB at university. Research poster presentation of PhD findings.
  • Promoting students' psychological well-being through volunteering: What works and why?
    Promoting students' psychological well-being through volunteering: What works and why? Bell, Katie; Williamson, I. R.; Wildbur, D. J.; Tanner, J.; Matthews, H. Objectives: The study adopted a qualitative approach to explore the motives and experiences of university student volunteers who engage in volunteering to understand how they manage and sustain their volunteering, and how volunteering affects their well-being. Design: The study utilised semi-structured interviews consisting of a series of open questions, permitting flexibility and in-depth discussion. . Methods: Participants were a purposive sample of 45 university student volunteers aged 18 years or over and studying at British universities. Participants were volunteering or had undertaken regular voluntary work relating to chronic illness, psychological difficulties or disability within the twelve months prior to the interview. Using grounded theory a three phase model was developed which comprises five themes capturing key elements of the development and maintenance of student volunteering. Results: Phase one - 'Getting involved' outlines the 'Motives and catalysts' for students starting to volunteer. Phase two - 'Maintaining commitment' includes three themes ('Making connections' 'Developing resilience' and 'Keeping the balance'), which represent important components of sustained volunteering participation. Phase three - 'Reaping the rewards' focuses on the benefits of volunteering identified by participants around self-development and employability. We discuss our findings in relation to how successful volunteering enhances key components of psychological well-being and facilitates ‘flourishing’ among student volunteers. Conclusions: The findings provide valuable insight into the initiation and maintenance of student volunteering. Further, they have implications for educational institutes such as universities involved in initiatives which include the training, mentoring and support of student volunteers, as well as promoting their well-being.

Click here for a full listing of Diane Wildbur's publications and outputs.

Research interests/expertise

  • Psychological well-being in University students and older people
  • Perceptions of control and responsibility in relation to well-being
  • Human spatial memory.

Areas of teaching

  • Psychological Well-being
  • Positive Psychology
  • Abnormal Psychology
  • Research Methods and Statistics.

Qualifications

  • PhD – University of Leicester
    BSc Psychology – University of Leicester.

Courses taught

  • PSYC1090 Introductory Research Methods in Psychology (Module Leader)
  • PSYC1094 Empirical Psychology
  • PSYC2013 Further Research Methods for Psychologists
  • PSYC2090 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC3000 Psychology Project
  • PSYC3099 Well-being & Positive Psychology (Module Leader)
  • PSYC5402 Well-being through the Lifespan
  • PSYC5403 Lifestyle, Wellness and Well-being (Module Leader)
  • PSYC5406 Approaches to Psychological Problems
  • PSYC5605 Research Methods and Data Analysis for Applied Psychologists
  • SALT2005 psychology for Speech and Language Therapy.

Membership of external committees

  • Higher Education Academy - 2006-date (Fellow)
  • British Psychological Society - 2005-date (Chartered Fellow)

Internally funded research project information

Role: Project Lead
Project title: Student and Staff Expectations and Experiences of the Feedback Process.
Funding: DMU Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund
Duration: 2007-2008

Professional esteem indicators

Reviewer for Memory & Cognition, 2011 – date.

Reviewer for McGraw Hill publishers - Research methods and Statistics texts. Last review completed 2009: Field A. Discovering Statistics, Using SPSS.
Diane Wildbur

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