Dr Martin John James Beckinsale

Job: Senior Lecturer in Strategy and Management

Faculty: Business and Law

School/department: Faculty of Business and Law

Research group(s): CREME

Address: The Gateway, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 2078231

E: mbeckinsale@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/bal

 

Personal profile

Dr. Martin Beckinsale is a Senior Lecturer & Researcher in Strategy and Management at Leicester Business School (DMU).  As a module leader, his teaching focus relates to EBusiness, Service Operations and Business Research Issues and Analysis.  He is a research team member of CREME (Centre for Research in Ethnic Minority Entrepreneurship) and a member of the ESRC Peer Review College and ISBE (The Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship).  Currently he is the ICT and EBusiness track chair for the ISBE Conference.

His academic background began in Strategic Technology Management, Small Firms and Innovation.  Currently, he specializes in Information Communication Technology (ICT), EBusiness, Ethnic Minority Businesses (EMBs) and SMEs.  Since 2006, he has successfully obtained funding, through the Small Business Service and recently the ESRC Business Placement Fellows Scheme.  The objectives of both research awards focusing on the development of Ethnic Minority Business Support and ICT and eProcurement capacity building amongst Ethnic Minority Businesses.  A unique and critical aspect of his research focus has been the development of the ‘action research methodology’ assisting and enabling policy development and delivery.

Research group affiliations

CREME – Centre for Research in Ethnic Minority Entrepreneurship

Publications and outputs 

 

  • Understanding Social Media Entrepreneurship to promote innovation within SMEs
    Understanding Social Media Entrepreneurship to promote innovation within SMEs Beckinsale, M. J. J.; Romano, S. TOPIC Social media has transformed the delivery, structure and availability of information, putting the once capital-intensive role of broadcasting (Simmons et al., 2011) within the reach of individuals. New interactions are generated by social media technologies (Hanse et al., 2010); connectivity is enhanced by human networks (Hwang and Kim, 2015). Blackshaw & Nazaro (2006, cited in Xiang and Gretzel 2010) define Social Media as Internet-based applications that carry consumer-generated content. Importantly, Hansen et al. (2011) adds a focus on the tools and potential business benefits to improve quality and create customer and partner communities (Hansen et al., 2014). Furthermore, the information shared through the networks has significant business value that plays an essential role within the business (Hansen et al., 2011) AIM Social media provides immense power to consumers and transforms individuals from passive recipients of information and products into active creators of content (information and ideas) who are able to actively and immediately communicate with one another. Digital technologies produce positive social impact in various fields from healthcare to financial sectors (DCMS, 2017). Interactions and collaborative technologies are included by social media (Farshid et al., 2011). Researchers have highlights the benefits for businesses to engage with social media to improve their communication and brand management viewpoints (Barwise and Meehan, 201; Gaines-Ross, 2010; EFMA, 2013), while others pointed out the positive impact of on-line engagement for off-line social relationships (Fisher and Reuber, 2011) and mobile marketing (Jayawardhena et al., 2009). Finally, Durkin et al. (2013) identify, a paucity of social media research relating to strategic considerations, innovation and entrepreneurship. However, one of the emerging challenges facing Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) is how they appropriately incorporate and harness the mass collaboration that social media facilitates. METHODOLOGY The paper is based on a qualitative study; it used observation to explore certain kinds of structured data (Mintzber, 1973). The data were collected by observing two SMEs based in Leicester. Observation allowed us to inductively develop patterns of social media use and activities. For the paper two case studies will provide the data for analysis. Observations of the case studies social media use will also be undertaken to observe and record their online actions and behaviours (Collis and Hussey, 2014: 148). The non-participant observation will be undertaken via social media technologies used by the case studies. Some of the activities and meta-data will be aniseed using a variety of online tools (example: simplymeasured.com). Durkin et al.’s (2013: 724) theoretical model of social media adoption and use provides the framework of observation. CONTRIBUTION The paper adds to the current understanding of SMEs and social media us by adding to the context of innovation amongst micro businesses. Through observation the paper provides a number of good practice case studies. Key to the paper’s contribution is going beyond the understanding of use.
  • A Micro-SME Case Study of Social Media Adoption
    A Micro-SME Case Study of Social Media Adoption Beckinsale, M. J. J. Equipped by the advancement in technology, social media has altered the delivery, structure and availability of information, putting the once capital-intensive role of broadcasting (Simmons et al., 2011) within the reach of individuals. Blackshaw & Nazaro (2006, cited in Xiang and Gretzel 2010) define Social Media as Internet-based applications that carry consumer-generated content. Importantly, Hansen et al. (2011) adds a focus on the tools and potential business benefits. ‘Social media tools cultivate the internal discussions that improve quality, lower costs, and enable the creation of customer and partner communities that offer new opportunities for coordination, marketing, advertising, and customer support. These networks contain information that has significant business value by exposing participants in the business network who play critical and unique roles’ (Hansen et al. 2011: 4). Social media provides immense power to consumers and transforms individuals from passive recipients of information and products into active creators of content (information and ideas) who are able to actively and immediately communicate with one another. One of the emerging challenges facing Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) is how they appropriately incorporate and harness the mass collaboration that social media facilitates. Durkin et al. (2013: 720) state, ‘Where attention has been applied to the SME context the focus (current literature) has mainly been on primarily tactical marketing issues.’ In addition literature documents the impact of on-line engagement for off-line social relationships (Fisher and Reuber, 2011) and mobile marketing (Jayawardhena et al., 2009).’ However, Durkin et al. (2013) identify, a paucity of social media research relating to strategic considerations, innovation and entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship enables enterprises to successfully identify business opportunities, develop: products; markets; the supply chain and thus increase their competitiveness and innovative capacity (Birkinshaw, 2000). The researchers suggest, social media can significantly help in this regard. However, the ONS (2014) data, states only 54.0% of all businesses use social media. A closer examination of the ONS (2014) data and outlined academic research (Durkin et. al, 2013 and Simmons et al, 2011) highlight a number of problems: Problem 1: Micro businesses are significantly less likely than small businesses to use the technology for customer and innovative purposes. The ONS (2014) data states only 5.8% of micro businesses use social media to innovate compared to over 30% using social media for customer relationship activities. It is also noted that under 30% of micro businesses use social media compared to over 50% of small businesses. Suggesting they are less likely to benefit entrepreneurially from social media. Problem 2: There is a paucity of theoretical understanding and literature relating to relationship between social media and entrepreneurial activity. Current frameworks fail to provide an understanding of the concept, structures and relationships. AIMS & OBJECTIVES The paper aims to begin to address these problems by way of two key objectives: Objective 1: To identify and examine why and how a micro SME has adopted and used social media operationally and strategically. Objective 2: To understand the decision-making for social media use. What can be learned from the case studies experience and decisions? METHODOLOGY In response to the objectives and the focus on social media use and activities the primary strategy for data collection is in depth/detailed interviews and observation. For the paper a single case study will provide the data for analysis. Observations of the case studies social media use will be undertaken to observe and record their online actions and behavior (Collis and Hussey, 2014: 148). The non-participant observation will be undertaken via social media technologies used by the case studies. Some of the activities and meta-data will be analysed using a variety of online tools (example: simplymeasured.com). Durkin et al.’s (2013: 724) theoretical model of social media adoption and use provides the framework of observation and interview questions. CONTRIBUTION The paper adds to the current understanding of SMEs and social media us by adding to the limited understanding of social media use amongst micro businesses. Through empirical data collection and analysis the paper provides a detailed and in depth understanding of social media use by a micro SME. Key to the paper’s contribution is going beyond the understanding of use. Therefore, the contribution is to: understand micro SME social media adoption and activity; and to take the first steps in developing guidance and support for micro SMEs wanting to use social media for entrepreneurial purposes. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version
  • The Examination of Entrepreneurial Activities of Diverse SMEs at a time of Disruptive Change
    The Examination of Entrepreneurial Activities of Diverse SMEs at a time of Disruptive Change Beckinsale, M. J. J.; Glover, Jane Objectives The paper examines how diverse small firms engage in entrepreneurial activity during times of disruptive change and in doing so seeks to gain an understanding of how to stimulate small firm resilience. The paper acknowledges that diverse small firms can be resilient and innovative through utilising multiple strategies, but the question is how in the current policy climate following radical change to business support models. Prior Work Research has only just begun to explore what drives entrepreneurial decisions during challenging times (Bullough and Renko, 2013). Recent changes to government policy on business support (Mole et al, 2009; Lockett et al, 2008 & 2012) drives the research in this paper seen as a key construct of disruptive change. The themes emerging from the current research focus on new entrepreneurial structures, increasing technological reliance across all stakeholders and the need for clear lines of communication, structures and strategies from key stakeholders. How diverse small firms go about navigating through these policy changes whilst also experiencing disruptive change in the form of the recent recession and how they develop resilience is a primary focus of the research. Approach The research will follow an engaged scholarship approach to the methodology and the principles of public engagement outlined by PEALS (Policy Ethics and Life Sciences at Newcastle University). The methodology suggested is a ‘participative form of research for obtaining the different perspective of key stakeholders … to understand a complex social problem’ (Van de Ven, 2007:9). Stakeholders include diverse SMEs, business support, policy deliverers and third party organisations and these will yield qualitative data by way of action learning sets (i.e. workshops and focus groups) as well as providing a source of quantitative survey data. Results The findings indicate that small firms have to respond entrepreneurially to disruptive change particularly when multiple factors affect change in this case policy changes and economic downturn. Implications The work contributes to the diversity research agenda as well as growing interest in entrepreneurial resilience. The paper also generates policy implications for the diverse business population of Leicester and a Framework for public engagement to support academically and practically those businesses beyond 2014. Value The value relates to policies or interventions that can be put in place in order to help small firms build innovative capacity particularly in order to survive disruptive change.
  • Human resource development for inclusive procurement by intermediation: a situated learning theory application.
    Human resource development for inclusive procurement by intermediation: a situated learning theory application. Theodorakopoulos, N.; Ram, Monder; Beckinsale, M. J. J. Recent thinking in academic and policy making circles puts forward the idea that ethnic minority businesses need to escape from their disadvantageous sectoral concentration through diversification into higher value-added activities. Drawing on the US experience, it has been suggested that intermediation initiatives that promote the concept of supplier diversity hold a great promise. Such initiatives are concerned with developing and bringing together corporate procurement officials (CPO) of large organisations and ethnic minority business owner-managers (EMBOs), so that the two parties can engage meaningfully. Yet, in the UK such initiatives are still at an early stage of development and there is little detailed evidence of their modus operandi or effectiveness. Hence, the main aim of this article is to demonstrate how nurturing and facilitating the interaction of communities of practice of CPOs and EMBOs can help their professional development and their approaches to procuring and supplying respectively. Situated learning theory is used to this effect, contributing to the debate around its usefulness and on the constructability and performative advantages of communities of practice. The paper reports on the researchers’ experience with two projects relating to intermediation initiatives that brought together and developed CPOs of large organisations and EMBOs. The lessons drawn would be useful for intermediary organisations, large procurers and minority suppliers who are willing to engage with the concept of supplier diversity.
  • E-business and the SME: international perspectives of deployment
    E-business and the SME: international perspectives of deployment Jones, P.; Packham, G.; Beckinsale, M. J. J. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link
  • Ebusiness among ethnic minority businesses : ethnic entrepreneurs' ICT adoption and readiness.
    Ebusiness among ethnic minority businesses : ethnic entrepreneurs' ICT adoption and readiness. Beckinsale, M. J. J.
  • ICT adoption and ebusiness development: Understanding ICT adoption amongst ethnic minority businesses.
    ICT adoption and ebusiness development: Understanding ICT adoption amongst ethnic minority businesses. Beckinsale, M. J. J.; Ram, M.; Theodorakopoulos, N.
  • Ebusiness among ethnic minority businesses : the case of ethnic entrepreneurs.
    Ebusiness among ethnic minority businesses : the case of ethnic entrepreneurs. Beckinsale, M. J. J.
  • E-business among ethnic minority businesses : the case of ethnic entrepreneurs.
    E-business among ethnic minority businesses : the case of ethnic entrepreneurs. Beckinsale, M. J. J.
  • Delivering ICT to ethnic minority businesses: An action-research approach
    Delivering ICT to ethnic minority businesses: An action-research approach Beckinsale, M. J. J.; Ram, M.


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to see a full listing of Martin John James Beckinsale's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

Theodorakopoulos, N., Ram, M. & Beckinsale, M. J. J. (2012) Developing Procurement Officials and Ethnic-minority Business Owners for Supplier Diversity by Nurturing Communities of Practice: Lessons from two Intermediation Initiatives, International Journal of Human Resource Management.

Beckinsale, M. J. J. (2011) eBusiness among Ethnic Minority Businesses: Ethnic Entrepreneurs’ ICT Adoption and Readiness in Sharma, S. K. (ed) E-Adoption and Socio-Economic Impacts: Emerging Infrastructural Effects, first edition pp. 168-189.

Beckinsale, M. J. J., Ram, M. & Theodorakopoulos, N. (2011) ICT Adoption and EBusiness Development: A Framework for Ethnic Minority Businesses, International Small Business Journal, Vol: 29 (3), pp. 193-219.

Beckinsale, M. J. J. (2009) eBusiness among Ethnic Minority Businesses: The Case of Ethnic Entrepreneurs, International Journal of E-Adoption, Vol: 1 (4), pp. 75-94.

Beckinsale, M. and Ram, M. (2006) ‘Delivering ICT to Ethnic Minority Businesses: An Action Research Approach’, Environment and Planning, Government and Policy (Environment and Planning ‘C’), 24, 6: 847-867.

Research interests/expertise

Small and Medium Sized Enterprises

ICT Management and Policy Issues related to SMEs and EMBs

eProcurement policy related issues for small firms and business support

Search Engine Optimisation

Areas of teaching

Business Research Issues and Analysis – CORP2181 (Module Leader)

Service Operations Management – CORP3171

Contemporary Management & Operations – CORP2165

EBusiness – CORP3500 (Module Leader)

Research Projects – CORP3400 (Projects Tutor FT)

Operations and Human Resources Management – CORP5041 (PT/FT)

Master’s (MSc) Small Projects A and B Tutor

Master’s (MSc IBM) Dissertation Tutor

eCreativity -CORP2532 (Module Leader)

Courses taught

PhD (Aston University) - Strategic Innovation Networks

MSc (U.M.I.S.T) in Strategic Management of Technology

BSc.(Hons) (University of Warwick) Engineering Science and Business Studies

Honours and awards

ESRC    

Membership of professional associations and societies

ISBE

Conference attendance

Beckinsale, M (2011) ICT Business Support: The Future? The 34th Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 9th-Nov 10th, Sheffield, UK

Beckinsale, M and Ram, M (2010) A Critique of e-procurement Business Support in Birmingham, UK ®, The 33rd Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 2nd-Nov 4th, London, UK

Beckinsale, M (2010) Influences and Influencing e-procurement amongst Black Busineses (BMEs) ®, The 33rd Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 2nd-Nov 4th, London, UK

Beckinsale, M and Ram, M (2009) The Rationale for Action Research: Learning from and Applying to EMB Business Support ®, The 32nd Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 3rd-Nov 6th, Liverpool, UK  - Nominated Best in Business Support Track

Beckinsale, M and Levy, M. (2009) The role of change agents in diffusion of innovation of Internet technology in SMEs: the case of broadband introduction in the UK West Midlands ®, The 32nd Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 3rd-Nov 6th, Liverpool, UK

Beckinsale, M and Ram, M (2008) SME/EMB Action Research: A Framework for ICT policy driven initiatives ®, The 31st Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 5th-Nov 7th, Belfast, Ireland – Nominated Best in Track E

Beckinsale, M and Ram, M (2007) Ethnic Minority Business (EMB) Exemplars: Engaging EMBs in Public E-Procurement, ISBE 2007, The 30th Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Nov 6th-Nov 9th, Glasgow, Scotland – Best in Track E Winner

Beckinsale, M and Ram, M (2006) ICT Adoption and EBusiness Development: A Framework for Ethnic Minority Businesses, ISBE 2006, The 29th Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Oct 31st-Nov 2nd, Cardiff, England – Best in Track E Winner

Current research students

1st Supervisor PhD FT Qasim Irshad

1st Supervisor PhD PT Faisal Hanif

Externally funded research grants information

August 2012 Leicester City Council funded project.  Examining the interplay between council business relationships and diverse small firms.  The research will also focus on developing the relationships among diverse business to enhance diminishing business support availability.  The development will consider how the structures and mechanism can benefit council activities and aim to put in place solutions to achieve good practice.

Professional esteem indicators

ESRC Peer Review College

RAKE - Research and Knowledge Exchange Fund (Reviewer)

International Small Business Journal (ISBJ) Reviewer

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research Reviewer

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