Dr Irene Antonopoulos

Job: Senior Lecturer

Faculty: Business and Law

School/department: Leicester De Montfort Law School

Address: HU 5.79, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 207 8188

E: irene.antonopoulos@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/bal

 

Personal profile

Irene graduated with an LLB degree from the University of Leicester in 2008 and completed her LLM in Human Rights at the same institution in 2009. She received her PhD in Law (‘The human rights aspects of environmental protection’) from the University of Aberdeen in 2014. She has previously worked as a trainee at the Council of Europe and more recently at the University of Surrey, before joining De Montfort School of Law in September 2015.

Irene is teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. She teaches courses in Human Rights Law, Immigration and Refugee Law and Research Methods. 

Irene’s research interests are focused on Human Rights Law, Environmental Law, Sustainable Development and drawing linkages between them, as well as Public International Law.

Publications and outputs 

  • Climate change effects on human rights
    Climate change effects on human rights Antonopoulos, Irene The climate change effects on human rights, are the consequences of climate change and climate change adaptation strategies on the enjoyment of human rights as guaranteed by International human rights instruments. Climate change affects the natural environment primarily. But human rights analysis focuses on the anthropocentric interests to these environmental changes; how does climate change affect human rights. The traditional notion of human rights suggests that individuals should be protected by state interference with the enjoyment of their fundamental human rights. In the case of climate change, human rights are under a threat due to a global environmental phenomenon, creating a challenge over imposing state duties to protect the affected human rights. Although the link between climate change and human rights is evident, there is little legal response that will efficiently address the protection of the rights of affected people amidst climate change effects
  • Climate induced displacement
    Climate induced displacement Antonopoulos, Irene The relocation within the homeland’s border or across its borders, as a response to climate change effects, including rising sea levels and increased frequency of extreme weather phenomena attributed to climate change, in pursuit of a safer natural environment. The responses to climate induced displacement are currently inadequate due to the inability of International Law to protect climate refugees.
  • The day after: Protecting the human rights affected by environmental challenges after the EU accession to the European Convention on Human Rights
    The day after: Protecting the human rights affected by environmental challenges after the EU accession to the European Convention on Human Rights Antonopoulos, Irene This article explores whether a potential accession of the European Union to the European Convention on Human Rights, offers a more effective method of protection for ‘environmental human rights’: those rights whose enjoyment is allegedly affected by environmental challenges. The European Court of Human Rights has decided on claims of alleged violations of human rights by both environmental degradation and the enforcement of environmental protection policies implementing EU environmental law. On the other hand, the capacity of the Court of Justice of the European Union to decide on human rights issues has been repeatedly challenged, while the inability of the Court to protect procedural (environmental) rights when it came to NGOs, allows for challenging the capacity of the Court of Justice of the European Union to protect substantive (environmental) rights as well. Will an accession mean that applicants will be able to bring claims for alleged violations, caused by the enforcement of EU generated environmental protection policies, against the EU Institutions rather than the enforcing State? This article follows the relevant developments towards the accession, and consequently seeks to determine how the day after the accession will look for the protection of human rights affected by environmental challenges. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • The Continuing Chronology of Confusion: Crime Prevention, Welfare and the Why of Youth Justice
    The Continuing Chronology of Confusion: Crime Prevention, Welfare and the Why of Youth Justice Antonopoulos, Irene; Dingwall, Gavin; Hillier, Tim International human rights law states that child well-being must be paramount. The aims of the Youth Justice System in England and Wales should reflect this, but the present system fails to do so as its aims are various and lack coherence. This article argues that this incoherence emanates from an apparent conflict between welfare and crime prevention. The authors argue that this dichotomy is false if one recognises that crime will only be prevented by prioritising the welfare and well-being of the child offender. Adopting this approach would satisfy international obligations and reduce the risk of offending and re-offending. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Young Offenders' Right to Integration post Human Rights Act 1998: Work as punishment, rehabilitation and enabler
    Young Offenders' Right to Integration post Human Rights Act 1998: Work as punishment, rehabilitation and enabler Antonopoulos, Irene; Dingwall, Gavin A combination of international children's rights instruments and regional human rights protection framework has ensured the protection of children in custody. Whilst the United Kingdom has ratified the Convention on the Protection of the Rights of the Child, its provisions have not been implemented directly into domestic law. Nevertheless, domestic legislation providing for the safeguarding of young offenders in combination with the Human Rights Act 1998 has ensured that their rights are safeguarded. The recent election campaign once again brought out the debate over the relationship between the European Court of Human Rights and the UK Parliament. In this article, the authors seek to ascertain whether the proposed repeal of the Human Rights Act 1998 will disadvantage young offenders and, specifically, whether it will compromise their right to education and training whilst in custody, which is designed to enable their rehabilitation and (re)integration into society post-release. Open Access article
  • Responding to Claims of Property Interests on Maritime Public Property
    Responding to Claims of Property Interests on Maritime Public Property Antonopoulos, Irene The article discusses a court case of European Court of Human Rights which responded to claim of property interests on maritime public property that interfere with environmental protection. It mentions that the applicant has claimed regarding state's decision which has interfered with his rights. The court has reviewed the case and concluded that there was no violation of any human rights..

Research interests/expertise

  • Human Rights
  • Environmental Law
  • Sustainable Development
  • Public International Law

Areas of teaching

  • Human Rights Law
  • Immigration and Refugee Law
  • Research Methods

Qualifications

LLB (University of Leicester); LLM (university of Leicester); PhD (University of Aberdeen)

Membership of professional associations and societies

Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Society of Legal Scholars

Socio-Legal Studies Association

Irene Antonopoulos resized

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