Skip to content

Dr Chibuzo Jiten Ejiogu

Job: Senior Lecturer in Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour

Faculty: Business and Law

School/department: Faculty of Business and Law

Address: De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, United Kingdom

T: +44 (0) 116 201 3930

E: chibuzo.ejiogu@dmu.ac.uk

W: https://www.dmu.ac.uk

 

Personal profile

Chibuzo Ejiogu is a Senior Lecturer in Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour. He has previously taught at a range of UK universities. His industry experience includes working in FTSE 100 and multinational organisations across a diverse range of roles. He has won numerous awards for his academic excellence, research and teaching.

He teaches in the areas of HRM, Organisational Behaviour, Strategic Management and Change Management. He uses artistic and creative methods to facilitate learning such as LEGO Serious Play, graphic facilitation, visual storytelling, game-based learning, robotics, spoken word poetry, African traditional oral storytelling, Capoeira, African mbira and other forms of music and art to enhance audience engagement. He was part of a team at the University of Strathclyde that pioneered the ‘scenes and sounds of migration’ seminar series utilising documentary films, dialogue and music to explore and innovatively engage with the complex dynamics of migration.

Chibuzo’s musical poem on the mbira (African thumb piano) as part of an academic research paper on Diaspora Migrant Workers and Development, presented at CURAS 2018 conference:

https://twitter.com/AbdulRaheemAd/status/965993381225811968

#BringBackOurGirls: Crying For Chibok and Our Kidnapped Daughters – Poem by Chibuzo Ejiogu:

https://eniyato.wordpress.com/

https://omojuwa.com/2014/05/bringbackourgirls-crying-for-chibok-our-kidnapped-daughters-chibuzo-ejiogu/

Chibuzo’s teaching, research and activism are integrated and influenced by his role as a change agent in society, these centre around two main themes:

  • "What is the Sound of One Hand Clapping?" - Implications for People, Management and Organizations.
  • "Get Up, Stand Up, Stand Up for Your Rights" (Bob Marley) - Implications for Social Movements, Work, Markets and Society.

Research group affiliations

People Organisations and Work Institute (POWI)

Publications and outputs

  • Business, Human Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Global Financial Crisis: The Global Challenge of Embedding Human Rights in Organizations and Human Resource Management Practices
    Business, Human Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Global Financial Crisis: The Global Challenge of Embedding Human Rights in Organizations and Human Resource Management Practices Ejiogu, Chibuzo The relationship between business and human rights is important and complex. The social responsibility of business is evolving as Multinational Corporations become more pervasive and powerful; their global footprint can be a force for good or can have a negative impact on human rights. This chapter looks at the relationship between business, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and human rights in the context of the global financial crisis. The extent to which private corporations are expected to respect human rights, including socio-economic rights, is discussed. The balance between business profitability protected by commercial rights such as under the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the need to protect fundamental human rights is explored. The requirements for an effective international framework for business and human rights are analyzed with an emphasis on the Protect, Respect, Remedy Framework of the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the core labor standards of the International Labour Organization (ILO). Recommendations are made regarding the means to effectively embed the respect for, and promotion of, human rights across all aspects of an organization and its value chain.
  • Precariousness in Unlikely Places: The Role of High-Skilled Migrant Worker Networks in Resisting and Reproducing Precarity
    Precariousness in Unlikely Places: The Role of High-Skilled Migrant Worker Networks in Resisting and Reproducing Precarity Ejiogu, Chibuzo Research on changes to work and employment in the European Union (EU) have highlighted the increase in precarious forms of work (ILO 2012; McKay et al. 2012) especially among migrant workers (Anderson 2010; Potter and Hamilton 2014). However, precariousness has traditionally been conceptualised as affecting migrants in low-skilled, low-status and low-wage jobs (Ahmad 2008; De Lima and Wright 2009) and undocumented migrants (Bloch 2013). This chapter argues that high-skilled migrant workers are increasingly experiencing precariousness resulting from changes to immigration policies in the United Kingdom (UK). The precarisation of high-skilled migrant workers is not merely an issue of changing legislation but occurs within the context of, and is driven by, neoliberal economic transformations. This raises the question: How do high-skilled migrants respond collectively to precariousness? Migrant networks are increasingly recognised as important sites for the collective agency of high-skilled migrants in their attempts to resist precarity; the complex dynamics of migrant collective agency are explored in this chapter as well as the shadow cast by the ‘dark side’ of migrant networks: the social reproduction of the very things migrant networks aim to resist – the control, potential for exploitation and segmentation of high-skilled migrants in work and employment. This chapter is organised into five sections. After this introduction, the next section sets the conceptual grounds for understanding high-skilled migrant workers, migrant networks and precariousness. The third section discusses the research methodology and the research findings are analysed in the fourth section. The final section concludes and identifies directions for future research.
  • Restrictions and Resistance in The Postcolonial Periphery: Labour Power and Skilled Migrant Workers in The United Kingdom.
    Restrictions and Resistance in The Postcolonial Periphery: Labour Power and Skilled Migrant Workers in The United Kingdom. Ejiogu, Chibuzo Central to the understanding of work in and by the Global South are processes of migration, in particular, international mobility. Work undertaken by workers originating from the Global South is often located within industrialized economies of the Global North where their labour is expropriated. The flow perspective of the labour process (Smith, 2010) provides a sophisticated conceptualization of the labour process and labour power that is sensitive to flows of international migration but is silent in terms of an analysis of racial and ethnic discrimination, wider structural effects of the political economy on the migrant labour process and North-South power relations and asymmetries. Postcolonial studies provide a useful corrective to theories developed from the perspective of the Global North, such as LPT, by foregrounding colonial, decolonial and neocolonial relationships between metropolitan-core and colonial-peripheries in the global political economy, as well as the agency and collective solidarities of subaltern actors from the Global South. Therefore, LPT stands to benefit from a postcolonial orientation by developing a more nuanced and sophisticated analysis of work in and by the Global South. Insufficient attention to issues in the political economy and how this relates to the labour process have been identified as a weakness in LPT research, leading several authors to identify a nascent ‘fourth wave’ of LPT characterised by a stronger emphasis on the political economy through an analysis of capital-labour relations ‘beyond the workplace’ (Thompson and Smith, 2010). This chapter makes a theoretical contribution to the emergence of fourth wave LPT by developing a conceptualization of the relationship between the migrant labour process and core-periphery power relations from a postcolonial perspective. Postcolonial theory is not homogeneous, it is more appropriate to refer to it as postcolonial theories because it comprises a heterogeneous mix of theories including discursive and materialist approaches (Young, 1998; Jack et al., 2011; Loomba, 2015; Kerner, 2013, 2018). A postcolonial approach grounded in a materialist analysis of the political economy and culture (Lazarus, 2011, 2012, 2016; Mignolo, 2000; Quijano, 2000; Grosfoguel, 2002; Parry, 2004; Chandra, 2017; Rao, 2017; Deckard and Varma, 2019) will be drawn on in this chapter in order to develop an analysis of the migrant labour process in the context of North–South power relations and asymmetries (Kerner, 2018).
  • Translation in the ‘contact zone’ between accounting and human resource management: The nebulous idea of humans as assets and resources
    Translation in the ‘contact zone’ between accounting and human resource management: The nebulous idea of humans as assets and resources Ejiogu, Chibuzo; Ejiogu, Amanze Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the process through which ideas are translated across disciplines. It does this by focussing on how the idea that people are corporate assets was translated between the accounting and human resource management (HRM) disciplines. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on the interpretation of a historical case study of the travel of ideas between the accounting and HRM disciplines. Translation is used as an analytical lens as opposed to being the object of the study and is theorised drawing on insights from the Scandinavian Institutionalist School, Skopos theory and linguistic translation techniques. Findings Translation by individual translators involved the translator stepping across disciplinary boundaries. However, translation performed by interdisciplinary teams occurs in the “contact zone” between disciplines. In this zone, both disciplines are, at once, source and target. Ideas are translated by editing and fusing them. In both cases, translation is value laden as the motives of the translators determine the translation techniques used. Legitimacy and gravitas of the translator, as well as contextual opportunities, influence the spread of the idea while disciplinary norms limit its ability to become institutionalised. Also, differential application of the same translation rule leads to heterogeneous outcomes. Originality/value This is the first accounting translation study to use the theories of the Scandinavian Institutionalist School or indeed combine these with linguistic translation techniques. It is also the first study in accounting which explores the translation of ideas across disciplines. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Executive Compensation: Transparency, Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility Perspectives
    Executive Compensation: Transparency, Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility Perspectives Ejiogu, Chibuzo; Ogamba, Ikedinachi
  • Income Statement and Balance Sheet
    Income Statement and Balance Sheet Pepple, Dennis; Ejiogu, Chibuzo
  • Accounting for Accounting’s Role in the Neoliberalisation Processes of Social Housing in England: A Bourdieusian Perspective
    Accounting for Accounting’s Role in the Neoliberalisation Processes of Social Housing in England: A Bourdieusian Perspective Ejiogu, Chibuzo; Ejiogu, Amanze; Ambituuni, Ambisisi Abstract This paper seeks to account for how accounting is implicated in the neoliberalization processes of social housing in England. It adopts a processual view which instead of conceptualizing neoliberalism as static and ‘end-state’, views it as a dynamic process of neoliberalization. We draw upon Bourdieu’s notions of field, capital and habitus to frame our study. We focus on reform of the regulation of social housing in England during the period 2006–2016. We show that the process of neoliberalization of social housing in England was instigated by the state’s intervention to change the structure of the field in terms of norms, power relations and positions of players on the field. These changes brought about simultaneous changes in the habitus of the field as well as the structure and habitus of Housing Associations as sub-fields. We demonstrate how these changes create and reproduce a new system of domination where the tenant is the dominated player. We highlight the role accounting played in these changes in terms of being used as a tool by the regulator to achieve social control and drive change within Housing Associations and by the Housing Associations to evidence conformity with the new norms and adaptation. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • The dark side of transparency: Problematising the Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative as a Public Sector Transparency, Accountability and Anti-Corruption Initiative
    The dark side of transparency: Problematising the Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative as a Public Sector Transparency, Accountability and Anti-Corruption Initiative Ejiogu, Chibuzo; Ejiogu, Amanze; Ambituuni, Ambisisi This study explores the dark side of transparency by problematizing the Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (NEITI) as a transparency, accountability and anti-corruption initiative in Nigeria. It does this by interrogating the underlying assumptions that transparency in the form of increased information disclosure inevitably leads to enhanced accountability and reduced corruption. Theoretic insights are drawn from the transparency literature as well as from the International Accounting Standards Board's framework for financial reporting. The findings enable a more nuanced understanding of transparency – where and when transparency works, and where and when it may lead to unintended outcomes. They show how increased information disclosure conceals and legitimises the weak and corrupt reporting systems and practices of government agencies. They highlight the importance of understandability of information disclosed as a key requirement of transparency. They illustrate that transparency is a complex social process by highlighting the means by which the government tries to gain control of the NEITI organisation and how NEITI's ability to operate effectively is dependent on the political will of the government in power. The findings also demonstrate that the instrument through which transparency is enacted is itself a central actor in the transparency process as historical corruption within the NEITI bureaucracy as well as the opacity of NEITI as an organisation lead to outcomes of distrust, uncertainty and doubt amongst NEITIs target audience. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Nigerian Budgetary Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic and its Shrinking Fiscal Space: Financial Sustainability, Employment, Social Inequality and Business Implications
    Nigerian Budgetary Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic and its Shrinking Fiscal Space: Financial Sustainability, Employment, Social Inequality and Business Implications Ejiogu, Amanze; Okechukwu, Obiora; Ejiogu, Chibuzo Purpose: This article aims to explore the Nigerian government’s budgetary response to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the economic and social implications of the pandemic response. Design/methodology/approach: Our analysis is based on a review of secondary evidence such as Nigerian Federal Government budget documents, policy documents, Central Bank of Nigeria circulars, news media articles, World Bank and International Monetary Fund reports, Reports from Big Four accounting firms and policy think-tanks. Findings: We highlight how increased borrowing to fund COVID-19 related economic and social interventions have significantly squeezed Nigeria’s fiscal space. We also highlight that while some interventions provide short term economic relief to the poor and small businesses, other interventions and gaps in the policy response have the potential for significant negative impact on businesses, households and unemployment. In addition, we highlight the potential for long-term benefits to the health sector and for private sector engagement in corporate responsibility and philanthropy. Originality/value: We present a comprehensive account of the Nigerian government’s budgetary response to the COVID 19 pandemic and the economic and social implications of this response. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Corruption Fights Back: Localizing Transparency and EITI in the Nigerian ‘Penkelemes’
    Corruption Fights Back: Localizing Transparency and EITI in the Nigerian ‘Penkelemes’ Ejiogu, Amanze; Ejiogu, Chibuzo; Ambituuni, Ambisisi This study explores how the global transparency norm is localized in the Nigerian extractive industry. Transparency is theorised as a process which can be analysed in terms of rules, interactions, power games and context. Nigeria is conceptualized as a ‘penkelemes’ – a concept which denotes how traditions, norms and practices are intertwined with a system of corruption, kinship and patronage networks. Three main insights emerge. First, the complex motives and ability of local actors to balance demands for transparency from the international community with participation in the corrupt local political system determines which international norms they adopt. Second, the struggle for power over the transparency process determines the local understanding of transparency. Third, the link between transparency and corruption is paradoxical. Corruption conditions the enactment of transparency but even this corrupted transparency is useful in fighting corruption. Thus, transparency becomes part of the problem as well as part of the solution. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Research interests/expertise

His research promotes critical and ethical perspectives in understanding globalisation, markets, society, organisations and people. His multi-disciplinary and eclectic research covers regulatory and institutional change, migration, human rights, sustainability and sustainable development, energy policy and environmental governance, HRM, employment relations, organisational analysis, entrepreneurship, postcolonial studies, sociology of work, political economy, corporate governance, critical accounting, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and leadership. He uses a range of research methods including qualitative methods, quantitative methods, participatory action research (PAR), video and visual research methods. His research has been published in high impact academic journals and book chapters. He is a peer reviewer for top-ranked journals.

  • Sustainable development and sustainable HRM
  • Ethical HRM, precarious work, decent work, modern slavery and human rights
  • Critical and multidisciplinary perspectives
  • Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance
  • Accountability, transparency and corruption
  • Equality and diversity
  • Migration
  • Regulatory and institutional change
  • International and Strategic HRM
  • Reward management, executive compensation and performance management
  • Talent management and knowledge management
  • Worker voice, trade unions and advocacy
  • Social networks, civil society and social movements
  • Informal economy and entrepreneurship
  • Energy policy, environmental governance, green energy, oil and gas
  • Technology, digital economy and social media
  • Creative industries, art, music and sports
  • Tourism and hospitality

Book Chapters:

  • Ejiogu, C. (2018). “Precariousness in Unlikely Places: The Role of High-Skilled Migrant Worker Networks in Resisting and Reproducing Precarity”. In Fedyuk, O. and Stewart, P. (eds.) Inclusion and Exclusion in Europe: Migration, Work and Employment Perspectives. London: ECPR Press/ Rowman & Littlefield International. https://www.dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/17751
  • Ejiogu, C. (2013). “Business, Human Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Global Financial Crisis: The Global Challenge of Embedding Human Rights in Organizations and Human Resource Management Practices”. In Okram, B. (ed.) Corporate Goals and Responsibilities: Economic, Social and Human Rights. Dudweiler Landstr: Lambert Academic Publishing. https://www.dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/17753
  • Ejiogu, C.J., Ozoh, C.E. and Ejiogu, C.A. (2013). “Integrating Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility in the Context of a Global Financial Crisis: Enabling Sustainability through Executive Remuneration and Reward Strategy”. In Okram, B. (ed.) Corporate Goals and Responsibilities: Economic, Social and Human Rights. Dudweiler Landstr: Lambert Academic Publishing. https://www.dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/17752

Journal Articles:

Blogs:

Areas of teaching

  • International and Comparative HRM
  • Strategic Human Resource Management
  • Ethical HRM
  • Organisational Behaviour
  • Employment Relations
  • Change Management
  • Innovation Management
  • Strategic Management
  • Reward Management
  • Talent Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Equality and Diversity
  • Migration
  • Sociology of Work
  • Research methods

Qualifications

  • PhD in Human Resource Management, University of Strathclyde (2019) - Awarded with the rare achievement of 'No Corrections'.
  • MSc International Human Resource Management & Comparative Industrial Relations, University of Manchester (Distinction, 2010).
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Research Methodology in Business and Management, University of Strathclyde (2014)
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice in Higher Education, Coventry University (2018)

Courses taught

Globalisation and International HRM; Human Resource Management in the workplace; Employee Resourcing; Managing Organisational Change; Research Methods

Honours and awards

  • Winner of the first ever Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) Teaching and Learning Excellence Award in 2018 at Coventry University.
  • Winner of the 1st Prize for Paper Presentations at the Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change (CERIC) 2016 Doctoral Conference (Best Paper).
  • Awarded the Prize as the best graduating student in MSc International HRM and Comparative IR class at the Manchester Business School, 2010.
  • Awarded a Certificate of Achievement for marks above 85% in the “Accountant in Business” exam paper of The Association of Chartered and Certified Accountants (ACCA), UK, 2009.
  • Winner of the CIRDDOC/MacArthur Foundation 1st Prize in a Nationwide Legal Moot Court Competition (Nigeria), 2003.
  • 3rd Best Nationwide in examinations by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN/ATS part1), 2007.

Membership of professional associations and societies

  • Chartered Member, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (MCIPD), UK– Industry Practitioner Route.
  • Member, British Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA).
  • Fellow of The Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

Consultancy work

Design and delivery of bespoke training and consultancy projects