Professor Alasdair Blair

Job: Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor Academic

Faculty: Business and Law

School/department: Leicester Castle Business School

Address: The Gateway, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, LE1 9BH

T: +44 (0)116 257 7209

E: ablair@dmu.ac.uk

W: www.dmu.ac.uk/pol

 

Personal profile

I am currently Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor Academic at De Montfort University, appointed on 1 September 2018.

As Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor Academic, I work with colleagues across the University to ensure that we deliver excellent teaching and a first class student experience.  Although my responsibilities are primarily at a University level, I teach on the second year Politics of the European Union module and supervise undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations as well as Ph.D students.

I am a National Teaching Fellow and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. I hold a Jean Monnet Chair in International Relations and established the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence at DMU in 2013. Outside the University I am editor of European Political Science and served as Honorary Treasurer of the Political Studies Association from 2015 to 2018.

I previously served as Associate Dean Academic in the Faculty of Business and Law from 1 April 2017 until 31 August 2018.  In this role, I led on the academic development of the Faculty.  Previously I served as head of the Department of Politics and Public Policy from 2011 until 2017 and as Head of the Department of Historical and Social Studies from 2008 until 2011.

Prior to my appointment at DMU I was Jean Monnet Professor of International Relations at Coventry University.  Between July 2007 and August 2008 I was seconded for 40% of my time as Director of the Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP) which was based at Birmingham University. I have also held academic posts at the University of North London (now London Metropolitan University), Nottingham Trent University, and Loughborough University.

My main area of research and teaching is in the area of European Union Politics, British Foreign Policy, International Negotiation, Diplomacy, Qualitative Research Methods, and Teaching and Learning. My latest book is Britain and the World since 1945 (Routledge, 2015).  I am presently working on a 3rd edition of the European Union since 1945 (Routledge, 2019) 

I completed his PhD on Britain and European integration at Leicester University, where I also completed a MA in Diplomatic Studies.  My undergraduate studies were taken at Aberdeen University, during which time I spent a year studying at Earlham College in the USA on a Great Lakes College Association scholarship. I also possess an MA in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education from Coventry University.

Publications and outputs 

  • Engaging students as co-producers: a critical reflection on the policy commission model
    Engaging students as co-producers: a critical reflection on the policy commission model Blair, Alasdair; Griggs, Steven; Mackillop, Eleanor The teaching of political science has a tendency towards traditional classroom based learning environments. This article describes the development of an innovative model of student learning that takes place outside of the bounded nature of the established curriculum through the creation of a Policy Commission. The Policy Commission established an innovative ‘community of action’ that challenged traditional perceptions of the lone student as a producer of knowledge. This article describes the work of the Policy Commission, which engaged students in the act of 'doing Politics' and discusses the impact that it had on student learning. The article examines the potential of the Policy Commission model to offer a new form of learning. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • European Integration
    European Integration Blair, Alasdair The European Union (EU) consists of the largest group of advanced industrial economies in the world. Its origins can be traced to plans that were set down in the interwar period of the 1920s to overcome tension between European countries. The main impetus to European integration was the legacy of the Second World War and the desire to rebuild European countries through a process of external support that would avoid future conflict. Over subsequent decades the process of European integration accelerated through a widening of membership and deepening of policies. This movement to what European treaties have referred to as “ever closer union” has, nevertheless, created tension between member states and also between the institutions that govern the EU and its member states. It is a state of affairs that has resulted in an increase in support for political parties that challenge further European integration and who seek to return more powers to member states by reclaiming national sovereignty. The most significant development of this was the decision taken by the United Kingdom (UK) electorate to leave the EU in a referendum vote that took place on 23 June 2016. This development has led to significant turbulence within the EU and raised questions over the future direction of European integration.
  • New and Established Mayoralties: Lessons for Local Governance in Constructing New Political Institutions: The English and Polish Cases
    New and Established Mayoralties: Lessons for Local Governance in Constructing New Political Institutions: The English and Polish Cases Copus, Colin; Blair, Alasdair; Szmigiel-Rawska, Katarzyna; Dadd, Michael Reforming local government is a tool of government policy when faced with local, national and international pressures for change and no more so than in times of political, social and economic crises. The re-design of the institutional architecture of local political decision-making is therefore driven as much by the needs of the centre as of the localities, with a series of arguments for change propagated by the centre. Once local government is re-designed at the macro level, local political actors are faced with opportunities for micro-level re-engineering of the structures bequeathed by the centre. By using research among political leaders conducted in England and Poland the chapter explores how institutional design by central government aimed at solving one set of policy problems, can energise further local re-design of the new local political institutions. The chapter also explores how central government re-design of local politics can create a pattern of unfinished business which leads to further central interference in the architecture of local politics.
  • EPS Symposium Diversity and Inclusion in Political Science
    EPS Symposium Diversity and Inclusion in Political Science Stockemer, Daniel; Blair, Alasdair; Rashkova, Ekaterina; Moses, Jonathon The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • The discipline of Political Science in Europe: How different is it from Political Science in North America?
    The discipline of Political Science in Europe: How different is it from Political Science in North America? Stockemer, Daniel; Rashkova, Ekaterina; Moses, Jonathon; Blair, Alasdair The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Understanding first-year students' transition to university: A pilot study with implications for student engagement, assessment, and feedback
    Understanding first-year students' transition to university: A pilot study with implications for student engagement, assessment, and feedback Blair, Alasdair This article discusses the findings of a pilot-study that examined the adjustment experience of first-year students to university study. Based on a sample of 51 first-year students at one UK university, the article finds that while the majority of students considered that workloads, nature of assessment, level of independent reading, and learning were broadly in line with their expectations, they were less satisfied with the support provided in terms of contact time with the tutors and feedback on performance. These results thus provide a mixed picture, whereby academic workload and content are in line with students' expectations, but students do not fully comprehend what tutors want in assignments, despite knowing where to go for support. The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.
  • Lisbon Treaty
    Lisbon Treaty Blair, Alasdair The Lisbon Treaty was signed by the then twenty-seven European Union (EU) member states on 13 December 2007 and entered into force on 1 December 2009. Although it was the most significant reform to the EU since the Maastricht Treaty, it was the product of a long and drawn-out series of negotiations that had commenced at the Laeken European Council of December 2001 when EU leaders committed to make the EU ‘more democratic, more transparent and more efficient’. The so-called Laeken Declaration sparked a series of discussions to reform the EU’s decision-making processes and to review the policies and structures within it. This led to a proposal for an EU Constitutional Treaty which faced popular unrest among the electorate of many EU countries who were, among other factors, concerned about the very use of the term ‘constitution’. When French and Dutch voters rejected the Constitutional Treaty in 2005 it was clear that the Treaty could not succeed. Two years later in 2007 the baton to reform the EU was taken up by the German Chancellor Angela Merkel who sought to inject new impetus into the discussions. This in turn led to the creation of an intergovernmental conference (IGC) that was chaired by Portugal in the second half of 2007 and which concluded with agreement on the Lisbon Treaty.
  • Maastricht Negotiations
    Maastricht Negotiations Blair, Alasdair Legally known as the Treaty on European Union, the Maastricht Treaty entered into force on 1 November 1993. It is viewed as a key landmark in the development of European integration, bringing about the most significant institutional and policy changes since the Treaties of Rome were signed on 25 March 1957. The Maastricht Treaty was the product of twin-track intergovernmental conference (IGC) negotiations that focused on monetary union and political union and which took place at a time of momentous change in Europe. This included the end of the Cold War, the unification of Germany and dissolution of Yugoslavia. These developments created a heady climate where there was a tension between those countries that wished to pursue deeper European integration and those who wanted to retain more national control. And while the eventual Maastricht Treaty reflected these demands in a series of compromises, there was considerable public disquiet at the outcome. This led to a Treaty ratification crisis that highlighted for the first time significant public concerns regarding the future direction of European integration in the form of Euroscepticism.
  • Tony Blair
    Tony Blair Blair, Alasdair Tony Blair served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2 May 1997 until 27 June 2007, having been elected the youngest leader of the Labour Party on 21 July 1994. In office he had the distinction of winning three consecutive general election victories and being the Party’s longest-serving Prime Minister to date. As Prime Minister he proved to be a divisive leader through moving the Labour Party to the centre of British politics and establishing important social and constitutional changes, while at the same time supporting US foreign policy by committing the UK to participate in the invasions of Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003. The catastrophe of the Iraq War has overshadowed by his significant domestic and foreign policy achievements. This is a contribution to Gordon Martel's Encyclopedia of Diplomacy, where I am one of the contributing editors.
  • Jean Monnet
    Jean Monnet Blair, Alasdair Jean Monnet (1888-1979) is regarded as the founding father of the European Union (EU). A technocrat who was never a member of a political party, he played a key role in providing the intellectual stimulus behind European integration after the Second World War. And while he is best remembered for his contribution to creating the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), which was the forerunner of the EU, his interests were varied. He made an important contribution in the world of finance as well as public service and played a key role in influencing United States (US) policy towards Europe during and after the Second World War.


Click here
to see a full listing of Alasdair Blair's publications and outputs.

Key research outputs

Books

Blair, A., Britain and the World Since 1945 (Routledge, 2015), 208pp, ISBN: 978-1-408-24829-4.

Blair, A., The European Union: A Beginner's Guide (Oneworld, 2012), 211pp, ISBN: 1851688986.

Blair, A., The European Union since 1945 (Longman Seminar Studies in History Series, 2010), 2nd edition, 232pp, ISBN: 978-1408234525.

Curtis, S. and Blair, A., The Scholarship of Engagement for Politics: Placement Learning, Citizenship and Employability (C-SAP, 2010), 247pp, ISBN: 1-902191-42-0.

Blair, A. and Curtis, S., International Politics: An Introductory Guide (Edinburgh University Press, 2009), 344pp, ISBN: 978-0-7486-2415-7.

Blair, A., Companion to the European Union (Routledge, 2006), 371pp, ISBN: 0-415-35896-5.

Blair, A., European Union since 1945 (Longman, 2005), 166pp, ISBN: 0-582-42393-7.

Blair, A., Saving the Pound? Britain's Road to Monetary Union (Prentice Hall, 2002), 266pp, ISBN: 0-582-47290-3.

Forster, A., and Blair, A., The Making of Britain's European Foreign Policy (Longman, 2002), 223pp, ISBN: 0-582-418356-6.

Blair, A. Dealing with Europe: Britain and the Negotiation of the Maastricht Treaty (Ashgate, 1999), 285pp, ISBN: 1-84014-762-8.

Blair, A. The Longman Companion to the European Union since 1945 (Longman, 1999), 400pp, ISBN: 0-582-36885-5.

Research interests/expertise

My current programme of research being conducted falls into three main areas:

1.    Foreign Policy, Diplomacy and International Relations

Projects in this area are focussed on:

Global Politics book for Edinburgh University Press (co-authored with Steven Curtis and to be completed by May 2015).
Co-editing Routledge Companion to International Relations (with Steven Curtis and to be completed by September 2015).
Contributing Editor to Encyclopedia of Diplomacy (edited by Gordon Marten, Wiley-Blackwell, to be completed by January 2016).

2.     British Foreign Policy and European Integration

Projects in this area are focussed on:

Undertaking a study of British Foreign Policy since the end of the Cold War.
Discourse analysis of British Foreign Policy towards the EU.

3.     Scholarship of Engagement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Projects in this area are focussed on:

Comparative analysis of research on teaching and learning published by Political Science and International Relations academics.
The student as a producer in Higher Education.
Universities and the public voice.

Areas of teaching

International Relations

British Foreign Policy

European Integration

Diplomacy

Qualifications

M.A. (Hons) in Economic History and Politics, University of Aberdeen (1992)

M.A. Diplomatic Studies, Department of Politics, University of Leicester (1993)

Postgraduate Certificate in Information Technology, University of Leicester (1994)

Ph.D. on Britain and the Negotiation of the Maastricht Treaty, Department of Politics, University of Leicester (1998)

MA Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, Coventry University (2005) 

Courses taught

Politics of the European Union (2nd year undergraduate)

Diplomacy and World Order (MA)

Jean Monnet module

Honours and awards

Shortlist for best student experience, Guardian Awards (2015)

Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (2015)

Best article on learning and teaching published in the journal Politics (2012-13)

European Commission Jean Monnet Chair Holder, De Montfort University (2010-)

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA) (2007)

Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts (FRSA) (2006)

National Teaching Fellowship (2006)

SEDA Accreditation as a Teacher in Higher Education (2002)

Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (F.R.Hist.S) (2001)

European Commission Jean Monnet Chair Holder, Coventry University (2001-2008)

Membership of external committees

Executive Committee of the Political Studies Association of the UK

Member of British International History Group Executive (2011-)

Membership of professional associations and societies

Political Studies Association (1995-)

University Association for Contemporary European Studies (2001-)

British International Studies Association (1998-)

Conference attendance

2014 Blair, A. 'Where have we got to in UK Higher Education Research in Politics and International Relations', paper presented at the American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Philadelphia, February 2014.

2013 Blair, A. 'Where have we got to in UK Higher Education Research in Politics and International Relations', paper presented at the Political Studies Association Annual Conference, Cardiff, March 2013.

2013 Blair, A. 'Learning from Below: a comparative investigation into first-year students transition to University', paper presented at the Political Studies Association Annual Conference, Cardiff, March 2013.

2013 Blair, A. 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Using Twitter for teaching Politics and International Relations', paper presented at the American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Long Beach, California, February 2013.

2013 Blair, A. 'Similar or Different? A comparative analysis of Higher Education Research in Political Science and International Relations between North America and the United Kingdom', paper presented at the American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Long Beach, California, February 2013.

2012 Blair, A 'Improving Feedback to students of Politics and International Relations through Dialogue', paper presented at the British International Studies Association-International Studies Association joint conference, Edinburgh, 20-22 June 2012.

2012  Blair, A. ‘Can dialogue help to improve feedback on examinations’, paper presented at the Higher Education Academy Social Sciences Conference, Liverpool, 28-29 May, 2012.

2012  Blair, A. ‘Britain and Monetary Union’,  paper presented to the Sixth Annual European Union Centre of Excellence conference, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, 12-14 April 2012.

2012  Blair, A. ‘A World at war, a world at peace? The future of International Relations in the 21st century’, keynote paper presented at Online Learning Futures Festival ‘Follow the Sun’, 29 March 2012, http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/beyond-distance-research-alliance/festival/programme/europe-day-2

2012  S. Curtis, A. Blair, J. Craig, J. Parker and M. Wyman, ‘Preparing Graduates for the Changing World of Work: British Perspectives on Addressing the “Employability” Agenda in Political Science’, workshop at the American Political Studies Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Washington DC, 17th-19th February, 2012.

2012  Blair, A. ‘What feedback do Political Science Students Want? Lessons from a British perspective’, paper to presented to the American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Washington, DC. 17-19 February 2012.

2011  Blair, A., ‘Exam feedback: Supporting students and improving teaching?’, paper presented to the Political Studies Association (PSA) and British International Studies Association (BISA) 4th  Teaching and Learning Conference, Cardiff, 13-14 September 2011.

2011  Blair, A. ‘Bridging the Gap: Britain, the EU and the US’, paper presented at the British International History Group conference, University of Glasgow, 7-10 September 2011.

2011  Blair, A., ‘It’s the discipline, stupid: why feedback and assessment is problematic for Politics’, paper presented to the 3rd Assessment in Higher Education Conference, University of Cumbria, 6 July 2011.

2011  Blair, A. ‘Exam feedback: Supporting students and improving teaching?’, paper presented at Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for History conference, What do History Students Want, Loughborough University, 3 June 2011.

2011  Blair, A. and McGinty, S. ‘Strategies for making exam feedback dialogic’, paper presented to Higher Education Academy Assessment and Feedback Seminar, Empowering Students through Effective Feedback, De Montfort University, Leicester, 10 May 2011.

2011  Blair, A. ‘Negotiating the Atlantic: Britain, the European Union and the United States’, paper presented to the Fifth Annual European Union Centre of Excellence conference, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, 10-12 April 2011.

2011  Blair, A. and McGinty, S. ‘Student’s experiences of feedback: unpicking the NSS scores to support new teaching methodologies’, paper presented to the 13th Annual History Subject Centre Teaching and Learning in History Conference, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, 4-5 April 2011.

2011  Blair, A. and Curtis, S. ‘It’s Good to Talk: Improving Feedback to Political Science Students Through Dialogue – A British Perspective’, paper to presented to the American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, February 11-13 2011.

2011  Blair, A., Craig, J., Curtis, J. Parker ‘Programme Assessment: Leasons from Literature and Practical Experience’, paper to presented to the American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, February 11-13 2011.

2010  Blair, A. and McGinty, S. ‘Why dialogue matters in the student experience’, paper presented at the 3rd Political Studies Association Teaching and Learning Conference, De Montfort University, Leicester, 14-15 September 2010.

2010  Blair, A. ‘Britain and the Working Time Directive’, paper to presented at the Industrial Relations in the European Community Conference (IREC), Oslo, 8-10 September 2010.

2010  Blair, A. ‘Peer Feedback: Engaging Students through Dialogue’, paper presented at the Higher Education Academy Annual Conference, University of Bedfordshire, 23 June 2010.

2010  Blair, A. ‘Changing times. Changing minds: Britain and the negotiation of the Lisbon Treaty’, paper presented to the Fourth Annual European Union Centre of Excellence conference, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, 6-8 June 2010.

2010  Blair, A., Curtis, S. and McGinty, S. “It’s Good to Talk: Feedback, Dialogue and Learning’, paper presented at the PSA Annual Conference, Edinburgh, 31 March 2010.

2009  Blair, A. and Curtis, S. ‘‘The Scholarship of Engagement for Politics: A Research-Based Approach to Placement Learning’ at the FDTL Final Conference, Nottingham, 3-4 November 2009.

2008  Blair, A. and Curtis, S. ‘Experiencing Politics in Action: Democratizing Placement Learning and Politics as a Vocation’, presented at the PSA Specialist Group Teaching and Learning conference, Teaching Democracy: Youth, Citizenship and Political Science Education, Royal Holloway, University of London , 3-4 September 2008.

Consultancy work

2015: Consultancy to Higher Education Academy on Innovative Pedagogic Practices in the Discipline, £8,100.

2012: Consultancy to Higher Education Academy on assessment and feedback in Social Sciences, £5,000.

2012 Consultancy to Higher Education Academy for review of 1st year experience in HE, £10,000.

2008 Consultancy to University of Warwick, £4,716.

2008 Consultancy to University of Warwick, £10,000.

Current research students

I am interested in supervising research degree students who wish to explore research on British Foreign Policy, European Integration and Diplomatic Relations.  I am also interested in PhD applications on aspects relating to governance in international relations, and higher education research in the area of Politics and International Relations, as well as the scholarship of teaching and learning relating to reconsidering the role of Universities and students (broadly defined).

I have supervised 12 research students to completion.

I am presently supervising:

  • Adeniyo Oso, US Foreign Policy towards Nigeria since 1960 (PT) 2018-2022 (2nd supervisor)
  • Scott Leatham, Chinese Business and Governance (FT) 2015-2019 (1st supervisor)
  • Mark Charlton, DMU Square Mile, Ph.D (PT), 2014-2019 (1st supervisor)
  • Catherine Saltis, European Local Politics, Ph.D (PT), 2010-2019 (1st supervisor)


Completed research supervisions:

Haila Atlwaian, Intercultural Communication Challenges for Multinational Teams in Saudi Arabian Companies – Perceptions and Roles on Beliefs of Trust, Ph.D (FT), 2012-2018 (1st supervisor)

Abdulbaset Ghnedi, British Foreign Policy Towards Libya’, Ph.D (FT), 2009-2017 (1st supervisor)

Lei Dai, Translation Strategies for the Chinese Culture-specific Expressions in the Chinese Premier’s Press Conferences, Ph.D (FT), De Montfort University, 2015 (1st supervisor)

Jing Pan, Multi-Level Governance and the Council of Europe, Ph.D (FT) De Montfort University, 2015 (1st supervisor)

Mark Poynter, The End of Civilzations and the Remaking of the Last Man: Managing the  problems of conflict and stability within the ideas of Francis Fukuyama and Samuel P. Huntington, MPhil (FT), De Montfort University, 2013 (1st supervisor)

David Capel, The future of Defence in the newly enlarged European Union, MA Research (PT), De Montfort University, 2011 (1st supervisor)

Vaughan Waller, A world in disorder?: a critical review of the politics of world order from the end of the Cold War to the present day’, MA Research (PT), De Montfort University, 2011 (1st supervisor)

Andrew Thomas, Kul’tura Kosmosa: the Russian Popular Culture of Space Travel, MA Research (PT), De Montfort University, 2010 (1st supervisor)

Mark Rice, Escalation: A New Framework Applied to Military Conflict’, Ph.D (FT), Coventry University, 2009 (1st supervisor)

Thomas Weaver, American foreign policy under George W. Bush, MA Research (FT), Coventry University, 2008 (1st supervisor)

George Nyabuga, Impact of the Internet on politics in Kenya, Ph.D (FT), Coventry University, 2007 (2nd supervisor)

Jeanne Kaczka, Reconciliation mission of Coventry since the Second World War, Ph.D (FT),  Coventry University, 2006 (2nd supervisor)

Externally funded research grants information

2017: Jean Monnet European Module Funding, €30,000. 2016-2019.  Project Reference: 574790-EPP-1-2016-1-UK-EPPJMO-MODULE

2016: Innovative Pedagogic Practices in the Discipline, Higher Education Academy, £8,100

2015: Political Studies Association Overseas Travel Grant to present a paper at American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Washington DC, January 2015, £500.

2013:  Leicester De Montfort University Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, European Commission €75,000. This was one of only 3 awards made in the UK in 2013. Principal investigator.

2012:  Higher Education Academy UK Travel Fund award, £300.

2011:  Political Studies Association Overseas Conference Grant to present paper at American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, February, £500.

2010:  European Commission Jean Monnet Chair, €45,000. This was the first Jean Monnet chair award that the University had achieved and was the only European Commission funded chair in the University.

2009:  Higher Education Academy National Teaching Fellowship Scheme (NTFS) project strand (2009-12): ‘It’s Good to Talk: Feedback, Dialogue and Learning’, £199,975. This was a multi-University project (De Montfort University, University of Warwick and London Metropolitan University) that developed innovative approaches to the use of feedback practices that have informed the strategy of each University. Principal investigator.

2006:  Higher Education Academy, National Teaching Fellowship, £10,000.  This was the first NTF award for Politics and International Relations

2005:  George Bush Presidential Library Foundation Scholarship, $2,000, College Station, Texas, USA.

2002:  European Commission, Jean Monnet Chair.

2005:  European Commission Jean Monnet European Module (undergraduate level): ‘The New European Union’, €13,900.

2005:  Higher Education Academy Subject Network for History, Classics and Archaeology: ‘The Scholarship of Engagement of History’, £2,910.

2004:  HEFCE FDTL Phase 5 (2004-7): ‘The Scholarship of Engagement of Politics’, £249,089.40 (plus £25,000 transferability funding). This was a multi-University partnership that involved Coventry University, University of Warwick, and Oxford Brookes University. Co-investigator 2004-6, principal investigator 2006-7

2002:  European Commission Jean Monnet European Module (postgraduate level): ‘European Integration – Nationalism and Supranationality’, €9,100.

2002:  Higher Education Subject Network for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics: ‘the Internet as a teaching tool in UK Departments of Politics and International Relations’, £1,000.

2002:  European Parliament sponsored Question Time Workshop, October, £500.

2001:  Awarded a study tour of Japan by the Japanese Government. This was a competitive award to approximately 20 European citizens under the age of 35. 

Professional esteem indicators

I am presently an external examiner:

- MA in History at the University of Nottingham; and
- BA Politics and MA Politics and Research Methods at the University of Leicester.

Honorary Treasurer UK Political Studies Association

Editor European Political Science

Review Editor of European Foreign Affairs Review

Alasdair-Blair

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