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Associate Research Assistants

The CSA works in partnership with young people on many of our research projects. Young people have the right to be involved in issues facing them, and when helping young people, it's important to have young people as part of the team.

We have been working with Associate Research Assistants and we hope that this development will build on 30 years of participative work.

The ARA have worked on projects including U R Boss and evaluating an ESF-funded course for CXN in Leicester. We anticipate similar opportunities becoming available in the future.

What the Associate Research Assistants say about their work with CSA

"Everyone you work with is really friendly and willing to help out in just about any way. The training weekend lets you know more about what you can expect to be doing, who you will be working with and what is expected from you as an ARA.

It is a very challenging job, putting you in situations that may normally be out of your comfort zone, but doing it with all the support you could expect and need. I've learnt more on this job than I ever would have imagined and have gained knowledge and experience that will last me my life."
Susie Dobson

"Going to the organisations that work with young people, it was important that there were young people on the research team. There is a certain stigma of what a researcher looks like and for us to go to the organisations not looking like that stereotypical researcher for young people is important. It is positive and uplifting for them."
Harrison Carter

What the Associate research Assistants say about their work with Centre for Social Action

“Being an Associate Research Assistant is a fun, challenging and extremely rewarding job unlike anything I've done before. When I first started working with Centre for Social Action at De Montfort University I was unsure what to expect and felt extremely unequipped to do my job.

However, everyone you work with is really friendly and willing to help out in just about any way. The training weekend lets you know more about what you can expect to be doing, who you will be working with and what is expected from you as an ARA. Working alongside people of different ages who had much more experience than me was at first daunting, but I soon came to realise that I have just as much to offer and learn as everyone else and that if we all help each other along we can make a great team.

It is a very challenging job, putting you in situations that may normally be out of your comfort zone, but doing it with all the support you could expect and need. I've learnt more on this job than I ever would have imagined and have gained knowledge and experience that will last me my life. It's been especially interesting to see how research takes place from start to finish and how many different ideas and important points people can come up with when you throw young people into the mix.

No one is ever made to feel stupid for not knowing something and whatever background you're from, or whatever previous experience you have in research, you can always offer something more to the table. It's been a great experience and one I would definitely recommend.”
Susie Dobson

“One of the rights of children is to be fairly represented and going to the organisations that work with young people, it was important that there were young people on the research team. There needs to be a researcher there who is a young person. Young people bring a different light to research. There is a certain stigma of what a researcher looks like and for us to go to the organisations not looking like that stereotypical researcher for young people is important. It is positive and uplifting for them”.
Harrison Carter

© Centre for Social Action, DMU

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