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Placement of Salary Scale for Employees Newly Appointed to DMU

 

Placement of Salary Scale for Employees Newly Appointed to DMU| pdf(69 kb)

 

Go to a specific section:

1. Policy Statement|

2. Objective of the Policy|

3. Scope|

4. Guidelines on Determining Initial Salary|

5. Market Forces|

6. Training|

7. Monitoring|

8. Advice and Guidance|

9. Appeals Process|

10. Review of Policy|

Appendix 1 - Examples of Acceptable Forms of Evidence to Justify the Basis for Taking Market Forces into Consideration on Recruitment| 

 

 

1. Policy Statement

The University seeks to ensure that all decisions taken by staff involved in the recruitment and selection process and the setting of initial salaries of recruits newly appointed to De Montfort University are fair, justifiable and non-discriminatory.

 

2. Objective of the Policy

This policy aims to ensure that a fair, equitable and consistent method of setting the initial salaries for new recruits is adopted University wide and that all decisions taken are soundly based, justifiable and non-discriminatory.

 

3. Scope

This policy applies to the placement on salary scales for all staff groups on appointment to De Montfort University and it should be read in conjunction with the Policy and Guidelines on the Recruitment and Selection of Staff.

 

4. Guidelines on Determining Initial Salary

The following guidelines are to be followed when determining the starting salary of a new recruit. Many of the guidelines will be equally applicable to salary determination on internal promotion.

4.1. The Individual’s Existing Salary

When setting the initial salary of a new recruit, the individual’s previous salary should not be used as the only or main criterion for determining the salary for the new post as this could create anomalies or result in equal pay issues. The individual is to be paid for the job for which they have been recruited at DMU therefore, using the previous salary as a criterion on its own will be inappropriate for the following reasons:

• The previous salary may not have been assessed objectively and may not be a realistic measure of the expertise required in the new post.

• Salary levels differ between organisations and sectors and often depend upon factors which do not compare equally, one of which is the previous employer’s level of resources.

• The individual’s current salary may be low because of discriminatory practices in the previous organisation.

4.2. Senior Staff Posts

The salary band on which appointment is to be made will be established by the Vice Chancellor and the Director of Human Resources prior to the post being advertised. Appointment must be made within the salary band of the peer group for the senior staff.

The initial salary should be based on the following criteria:

(a) The individual’s years in service, whether continuous or not, in the same or similar role in the higher education sector or in a related field.

(b) The extent to which the individual meets the desirable criteria for the post and in particular the knowledge and expertise required.

(c) The degree of responsibility, accountability and individual discretion expected soon after appointment.

(d) Market rates for particular skills and expertise relevant to the job (Please refer to Section 5|).

In setting the initial salary, the manager will have been required to make an assessment of the job requirements and the expertise of the individual appointed compared with the expertise of other staff paid at a comparable level. Therefore, the manager must be able to justify the initial salary against the above criteria. The assessment should be recorded in writing, supported by documentation and must be endorsed by the Director of Human Resources and approved by the Vice- Chancellor before the offer is confirmed to the individual.

4.3. Academic and Academic Related Posts

For academic and academic related posts, the decision on placement on the salary scale should be based on the following criteria:

4.3.1 The individual’s years in service, whether continuous or not, in the same or similar role in the higher education sector (or equivalent work) should be taken into consideration. In this case, there will be an increment for each year’s service in the higher education sector, starting from the bottom of the Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer grade.
The individual’s relevant experience, whether paid or unpaid, should be taken into account.

In the case of a Principal Lecturer appointment representing a promotion from Senior Lecturer for an existing DMU staff member, the individual should not normally advance by more than one increment (in addition to any annual increment if not currently at the top of the Senior Lecturer scale). In the case of an external candidate, the criteria in 4.3.3| should be followed.

4.3.2. If the individual has not previously worked in the higher education sector, then the individual’s relevant years in service in an equivalent work will be considered. For example, years in service in a training role in another sector/ industry may be taken into account. In such cases, a year’s service in the relevant area would usually equate to an increment on the Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer scale starting from the bottom of the L/SL scale.

4.3.3 If the criteria in 4.3.1| or 4.3.2| are not applicable, the initial salary should be based on the following criteria:

a) The extent to which the individual meets the desirable criteria for the post and in particular the knowledge and expertise required.

b) The degree of responsibility, accountability and individual discretion expected soon after appointment.

c) The salary levels of existing staff with similar expertise and experience in a benchmark role.

d) Market rates for particular skills and expertise relevant to the job (Please refer to Section 5|).

In setting the initial salary, the manager will have been required to make an assessment of the job requirements and the expertise of the individual appointed compared with the expertise of other staff paid at a comparable level. Therefore, the manager must be able to justify the initial salary against the above criteria. The assessment should be recorded in writing, supported by documentation and must be approved by the Vice- Chancellor before an offer is made.

For example:

If a manager decides to recruit an individual who has five years teaching experience in the higher education sector and whose existing salary is point 6 on the Senior Lecturer grade, s/he would need to obtain evidence of such rapid progression from the individual to justify why placement should be on the recommended scale. Such evidence may include the award of accelerated increments or promotion from the institution(s) the individual has previously worked in, and accreditation for equivalent work or experience.

4.4 Support Staff Posts

For support staff posts, the salary scale on which appointment is made is established through the job evaluation process which must have been carried out before the post was advertised if the post is new. If the post has been amended from when the previous incumbent left the university, then it should be evaluated. New recruits will normally be placed on the bottom of the salary scale for the post but may be up to the mid point of the salary scale if the circumstances are justifiable. In exceptional circumstances where it is not practicable to appoint at the mid point, the appointment salary may be up to the higher half of the salary scale.

In cases where it is not practicable to appoint at the bottom of the scale, the initial salary should be based on the following criteria:

a) The individual’s years in service, whether continuous or not, in the same or similar role in the higher education sector should be taken into consideration. In this case, each year’s service would normally equate to an increment on the salary scale, starting from the bottom of the scale. If the individual has not previously worked in the higher education sector, then the individual’s relevant years in service in a related work in another sector / industry will be considered. In such cases, a year’s service in the relevant area would usually equate to an increment on the salary scale starting from the bottom of the scale.

b) The extent to which the individual meets the desirable criteria for the post and in particular the knowledge and expertise required.

c) The degree of responsibility, accountability and individual discretion expected soon after appointment.

d) The salary level of existing staff performing at that grade.

e) Market rates for particular skills and expertise relevant to the job (Please refer to Section 5|).

In setting the initial salary, the manager must be able to justify the initial salary against the above criteria. The reasons for appointing the individual on the recommended scale point should be recorded in writing and supported by documentation.

 

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5. Market Forces

 

5.1 Market Rate for Particular Skills and Expertise

If it is established that market forces are likely to influence the setting of the initial salary because of certain specialist skills required, the market rates must be investigated and documented by the manager before the post is advertised. Advice on market rates should normally be sought from independent experts. Information on market rates, how data can be obtained, and how it should be applied, can be obtained from your HR Partner.

The justification for taking market rates into account should be relevant to the job and should be objectively supported. The rates will be applied to all staff in the post in question and, for academic staff, will be specific to each discipline. Market rates are not a permanent addition to salary, and as such are not pensionable. These rates will be reviewed on an annual basis to check whether market conditions still apply.

5.2 Market rate for Specific One-off Posts

This is when an individual with particular sought after specialist skills may be negotiating a higher rate than that which is being offered. Decisions which include this factor must be objectively supported by evidence to justify appointment on the salary.

5.3 Evidence

Managers will be required to provide objective evidence to justify the basis for taking market forces into consideration. For example, the evidence could be based on any of the following:

• Inability to recruit to the post because required skills and experience are in short supply.

• Market rates for the required skills and experience are affected by a particular location close to the University site and this is affecting recruitment.

• Inability to retain skilled employees due to pay rates offered in the past.

The above list is not exhaustive as there may be other objective justification. See Appendix 1| for examples of acceptable evidence.

Managers are advised to identify which of the factors in 5.1| and 5.2| are in action when determining the salary on appointment and apply the criteria detailed under the relevant staff group in Section 4|.

The justification and evidence for taking market forces into account should be kept together with other documents relating to the recruitment process in the new employee’s file held in Human Resources.

 

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6. Training

The Human Resources Team will organise training sessions for managers who have responsibility for recruitment and selection decisions and the setting of initial salaries to ensure that they are familiar with this policy and have the skills to apply it. It will be mandatory for all members of the senior staff team and all staff with responsibility for recruitment and selection decisions and the setting of initial salaries to attend the training. All such staff will be required to have taken part in University approved training on this policy within 2 years of the policy implementation date.

The training sessions will run in conjunction with training on the Policy on Equality of Opportunities in Employment and the Policy and Guidelines on the Recruitment and Selection of Staff.

 

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7. Monitoring

An annual audit of the starting salaries of new employees will take place normally in the month of January. An audit group made up of:

a) The Vice Chancellor and the Director of Human Resources will audit initial salaries of the senior staff group

b) A Dean, a Director and a senior member of the Human Resources Team will audit initial salaries of the academic and support staff groups.

The Human Resources Team will collect and anonymise information relating to age, disability, ethnic origin, religion or belief, sexual orientation and gender of new employees for the audit groups to analyse.

The findings of the audit groups will be presented to the Equal Opportunities Advisory Committee (EOAC) at the April meeting for discussion. Where issues concerning equality are identified and need addressing, the EOAC will make recommendations to the Dean/Director of the work area for appropriate action to be taken and to the Vice–Chancellor for information.

 

8. Advice and Guidance

Managers should seek advice from their HR Partner if they require assistance with setting initial salaries.

 

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9. Appeals Process 

First Stage:

a) If an employee believes that his/her initial salary was low on appointment and has evidence to justify the complaint, s/he should raise the matter with their line manager in the first instance, and must provide the evidence when doing so.

b) The manager must review the evidence provided by the employee as well as review the reason(s) recorded for placing the individual on that salary on appointment, and respond to the employee in writing within 10 working days.

c) If, following investigation, there is evidence to show that the salary was low on appointment when compared to existing staff with similar expertise and experience, the manager should discuss with their HR Partner how best to resolve the situation.

Second Stage:

a) Should the employee not be satisfied with the outcome of the First Stage, then s/he should write to the Director of Human Resources with full written details of the appeal. The employee will need to ensure that these details include all the evidence, since s/he will not be asked to provide any further documentation.

b) The Director of Human Resources will arrange for a Pro Vice-Chancellor to consider the written appeal, and will write to the line manager who set the original salary requesting their written response to the appeal. The Pro Vice-Chancellor will consider the two written submissions with a senior member of the Human Resources team in attendance to act as adviser.

c) A written response giving details of the final decision will be sent by the Pro Vice-Chancellor to the employee and to the line manager who set the original salary.

 

10. Review of Policy

This policy will be reviewed annually during the month of May by the Human Resources Team to ensure that it continues to meet the University’s objectives and its legal obligations.

 

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Appendix 1

Examples of Acceptable Forms of Evidence to Justify the Basis for Taking Market Forces into Consideration on Recruitment

1. Market rates for the type of employment provided by an expert.

2. Market rates in published pay surveys.

3. Details of previous advertising of same or similar vacancies placed by University, and indication of poor response or poor quality of applicants.

4. Poor retention rate of previous post-holders where evidence suggests that pay, rather than other factors, is the primary concern.

 
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